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  1. #1
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    Show off your jerry-rig ingenuity!

    I've noticed that as commuters many of us are a practical lot and have a lot of ingenuity when it comes to solving a problem. I finally got a set of fenders for my old mtn bike turned SS commuter. These are the Planet Bike "Hardcore" 60mm ATB fenders for 26" wheels. I thought they would work with my knobbies that I was currently rolling. The front was fine but the rear posed a problem due to my rack. It didn't give any space for the fender to be moved up to clear the knobs on the edge of the tire. These were pretty good "hybrid" tires in that the center was relatively smooth and the outer part of it had knobs for grabbing. I really wanted to keep them, but, alas, they didn't work with the rear fender. So it was a good thing I had a set of fairly new 26" 1.85mm Michelin CiTY street tires from a previous bike whose frame I have long since sold. This solved the clearance issue.

    Now the problem was still the rack, and I did NOT want to remove it because it is very useful. The bike only has one eyelet on each side of the seat stay. I was able to fit the lower fender stays with the rack legs by using a longer eyelet bolt. I still needed some vertical support on the fender, which the upper fender stays would provide. But no place to put them. I didn't want to put it on the eyelet for a number of reasons. I thought of using those clamps that fit on the seat stays, but that would position the upper fender stays weirdly, and not to mention a good part of the stays would be sticking out back from the fender.

    So, I came up with this set-up. It involves using a used front brake cable (good thing I keep stuff like this in my parts bin!), washer, 10mm bolt and nut, and a small rubber tubing with a hole that snugs around the cable to prevent shifting, if that's even a problem.

    I'm quite proud of how it looks. I could have just used wires or strings to suspend the fender, but I like to do things that look like it was engineered for the purpose :P
    Cool thing about it was that it was all FREE!




    And here's the bike with the fenders. Bring it on puddles! Bring it on! You down with OPP? Yeah you know me!


  2. #2
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    Very nice, rigging is always a cost effective idea
    29" Tires looking to buy:

    Schwalbe Big Apples
    Continental Travel Contact/Cruise Contact

  3. #3
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Cool beans, djork.
    I can`t see how the cable ends anchor- just laid next to the bolt and pinched with the nut? Where did the "rubber tubing with a hole" go?
    Recalculating....

  4. #4
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    Adapting QR bar mounts for a double aimable headlight set:

    Fork Mount:



    Bar Mount with alternate light mount plate (used 2):



    Integrated to get QR and tilt/angle adjustments:





    On Road at 45 degrees:



    Apologies to those who have seen these before.

    BrianMc

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Cool beans, djork.
    I can`t see how the cable ends anchor- just laid next to the bolt and pinched with the nut? Where did the "rubber tubing with a hole" go?
    One end of the cable has the anchor that normally would hook to the brake lever. That end is on the left side of the fender, so no bolts there. The other end of the cable (cut part) is anchored by a bolt and nut/washer.

    The cable loops over the taillight braket and is actually between the braket and rack. This is where the rubber hose is. The cable is pretty tensioned that it won't shift much, but I threaded it through the rubber hose so that sharp jolts won't cause the cable to slide on the braket and cause it to fray over time. The space between the braket and the rack is very narrow that I had to soap the hose a bit to slide it in with the cable already threaded through. The cable is prevented from shifting due to the rubber hose squeezing on it. Hard to describe in detail, but it's a pretty secure set-up.

    Brinmc: Like the angled headlights. What kind of headlights are those?

  6. #6
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    ^^ LED upgrades in old NOS Marwi/Viewpoint lights available here:

    http://hoffmanamps.com/MyStore/perls...ER_ID=!ORDERID!

    Description of build and designing the 'snoots to civilize the beams:

    Beyond German Standards - road light experiments

    A polite spot for night use is not sufficiently visible in the day. An alternative would to swao the snoots for a widening lens. But I can reach down and re-aim the lights as the sun sets or rises with ease.

    BrianMc

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    djork, nicely done. Not jury-rigged or jerry-built but very well done.

    None of the other posts are either.

    Though the meanings of jury-rig and jerry-built overlap, these are two distinct expressions. Something poorly built is “jerry-built.” Something rigged up temporarily in a makeshift manner with materials at hand, often in an ingenious manner, is “jury-rigged.” “Jerry-built” always has a negative connotation, whereas one can be impressed by the cleverness of a jury-rigged solution. Many people cross-pollinate these two expressions and mistakenly say “jerry-rigged” or “jury-built.”
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork View Post
    One end of the cable has the anchor that normally would hook to the brake lever. That end is on the left side of the fender, so no bolts there. The other end of the cable (cut part) is anchored by a bolt and nut/washer.

    The cable loops over the taillight braket and is actually between the braket and rack. This is where the rubber hose is. The cable is pretty tensioned that it won't shift much, but I threaded it through the rubber hose so that sharp jolts won't cause the cable to slide on the braket and cause it to fray over time. The space between the braket and the rack is very narrow that I had to soap the hose a bit to slide it in with the cable already threaded through. The cable is prevented from shifting due to the rubber hose squeezing on it. Hard to describe in detail, but it's a pretty secure set-up.

    Brinmc: Like the angled headlights. What kind of headlights are those?
    Could use a cantilever cable saddle at the rack, too. Be fun to find one of the old skull or peace sign saddles.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    djork, nicely done. Not jury-rigged or jerry-built but very well done.

    None of the other posts are either.

    Though the meanings of jury-rig and jerry-built overlap, these are two distinct expressions. Something poorly built is “jerry-built.” Something rigged up temporarily in a makeshift manner with materials at hand, often in an ingenious manner, is “jury-rigged.” “Jerry-built” always has a negative connotation, whereas one can be impressed by the cleverness of a jury-rigged solution. Many people cross-pollinate these two expressions and mistakenly say “jerry-rigged” or “jury-built.”
    Thanks for the clarification, Shiggy. Yeah, I was a bit unsure about the spelling and the meaning of the term but used it anyway out of sheer laziness and convenience :P It was the closest word I could think of at the time. But I think a little ignorance of its true meaning played a part in it :P

    Here's another idea I came up with for installing my new Cygolite Hotshot. Amazon has a great deal at $28-something. I've read many great reviews so I picked one up as a little present to myself.

    I couldn't use the seat post mount due to my rack bag. I had a taillight bracket and thought that was a very ideal place for the Hotshot. After considering a few options I decided to go with this idea.



    I used a corner brace (one is shown atop the rack), couple of zip ties, 3M outdoor double-sided foam tape, and nut and bolt to secure the Cygolite latch to the braket. Perfect!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork View Post
    Thanks for the clarification, Shiggy. Yeah, I was a bit unsure about the spelling and the meaning of the term but used it anyway out of sheer laziness and convenience :P It was the closest word I could think of at the time. But I think a little ignorance of its true meaning played a part in it :P

    Here's another idea I came up with for installing my new Cygolite Hotshot. Amazon has a great deal at $28-something. I've read many great reviews so I picked one up as a little present to myself.

    I couldn't use the seat post mount due to my rack bag. I had a taillight bracket and thought that was a very ideal place for the Hotshot. After considering a few options I decided to go with this idea.



    I used a corner brace (one is shown atop the rack), couple of zip ties, 3M outdoor double-sided foam tape, and nut and bolt to secure the Cygolite latch to the braket. Perfect!
    They sell a rack mount on the website for around 5 or so bucks shipped FYI.

    Good deal though for the light from amazon
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Show off your jerry-rig ingenuity!-image.jpg  


  11. #11
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    Dominic: Phhht...now you tell me! :P Just went to the Cygolite'ssite and price is a tad under $4 but after shipping and tax it's about $7 and some cents. They're in Santa Ana and I pass there on my way to my friend's house in OC. Wonder if I can do a pick up.

    I actually like what I've done and think it looks kinda cool in a DIY sort of way, but I could sure use that seat post mount for my other bikes whenever I need a bright taillight.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork View Post
    Dominic: Phhht...now you tell me! :P Just went to the Cygolite'ssite and price is a tad under $4 but after shipping and tax it's about $7 and some cents. They're in Santa Ana and I pass there on my way to my friend's house in OC. Wonder if I can do a pick up.

    I actually like what I've done and think it looks kinda cool in a DIY sort of way, but I could sure use that seat post mount for my other bikes whenever I need a bright taillight.
    Your option allows you to more easily adjust the tilt. But I agree having the ability to transfer the light to a new bike if needed was worth the lunch money.

  13. #13
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    ^^I need to work out taillight mounts for my "secondary" commute bikes. After a long time with only one commuteable bike, I finally bought an additional headlight that can be quickly slaped onto two other bikes, but whenever I`ve done that I`ve just used a Superflash bungied to my helmet for rear lighting. Need to dig around and see if I still have any stay-mounted brackets stashed away.
    Recalculating....

  14. #14
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    So the thread is DIY, by necessity (they don't makeit) to economic causes.

    New (not shown here before) QR for double DIY tail lights:

    Lights using Marwi double mount (long nut & two bolts) fastened to standard top mount and the matching helmet mount, and lightened aluminum mount from a closet door track:



    Assembled:



    I have to tilt the lights down to clear the wire on the mount.

    Installed, view from side:



    Installed, view form top:



    Installes, afterburners on:



    Small, light, out of sight, and really cheap (all parts on hand).

    BrianMc

  15. #15
    S*it Happens!
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    Nice work!
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    Like life…the trail is unpredictable...

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