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  1. #1
    wrg
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    Sharing the trails, etiquette rules

    This is directed to the commuters and cyclists out there who share paved trails with pedestrians. What do you consider good etiquette when representing the cycling community as you approach others on the trail?

    Two things I always do to help maintain good relations with others out there on the trail are;

    1. I always say "passing on your left" as I approach slower riders or pedestrians who are going the same direction as me. That way I don't sneak up on them and scare them as I pass. Plus, the pedestrians especially seem to appreciate it.

    2. I always slow down as I pass families or young riders as a sign of respect and to ensure safe passing. You just never know what to expect when children are on the trail so it just pays off to go slow and to be aware of their actions in case they pull out in front of you.

    What do you, as riders, consider to be 'good etiquette' when sharing trails with others.
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  2. #2
    Squeaky Wheel
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    My etiquette rules for new commuters:

    1. Always call out "on your left" or "passing left" when passing peds or other cyclists.

    2. Move as far over as you safely can and give as much room as possible when passing.

    3. When coming up on large groups and especially families with kids, slow down and expect the unexpected.

    4. When riding in the dark with your light on, cover your light for oncoming bicyclists and pedestrians.

    5. When a faster cyclists passes you, it's not OK to speed up on hop on their wheel. If you want to draft, ask for permission first. If it's not given, back off.

  3. #3
    ride the moment
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    In another thread like this someone once suggested a general "Coming up behind you folks" or "bicycle" rather than "on the left." It actually works much better. The directions are too much for people, in my experience they often move the direction you call out and then get flustered. From as far away as I can I bellow out "coming up behind you" and then slow down and pass wherever they make space.
    Just because you read a book it don't make you conscious. - MC Lush

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^^
    Agree with this. The key word in "On your left" is "left." People can be forgiven for moving to the left.

    I generally treat MUPs like longer sidewalks, without all those little lines. If I want to ride at training speeds, I do it on a road, or during times of day when nobody, or nobody but runners and cyclists, is on the MUP. It can be annoying, but I think I get to my destination maybe 2 minutes slower, and in a much better mood.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrg
    This is directed to the commuters and cyclists out there who share paved trails with pedestrians. What do you consider good etiquette when representing the cycling community as you approach others on the trail?

    Two things I always do to help maintain good relations with others out there on the trail are;

    1. I always say "passing on your left" as I approach slower riders or pedestrians who are going the same direction as me. That way I don't sneak up on them and scare them as I pass. Plus, the pedestrians especially seem to appreciate it.Sometimes it works more often it doesn't

    2. I always slow down as I pass families or young riders as a sign of respect and to ensure safe passing. You just never know what to expect when children are on the trail so it just pays off to go slow and to be aware of their actions in case they pull out in front of you.Depends on the family

    What do you, as riders, consider to be 'good etiquette' when sharing trails with others.

    Basically stay the hell out of the way.....if that means off the path so what.

    And instruct the real dolts that the don't own anything more than i do....

    One of my favourites.....one way or the other ladies....while track standing in front of them.

  6. #6
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I have ridden a bike path a couple of times... I can't stand it! I don't want to have to tell people my every move...I'm on the bike because I'm trying to get away from you people. Also, I am apparently the fastest cyclist on the planet. I have never been on a bike path when I wasn't passing people constantly. I can honestly say I've never been passed on a bike path. In the real world I'm horribly slow, but on a bike path I'm a hero.

    I guess it's something you get used to? To me it sounds basically like being stuck in traffic on the commute, which I could accomplish in a car without actually having to talk to people.

    So obviously for me, the etiquette rule is "don't go on the bike path, they will hate you."
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I have ridden a bike path a couple of times... I can't stand it! I don't want to have to tell people my every move...I'm on the bike because I'm trying to get away from you people. Also, I am apparently the fastest cyclist on the planet. I have never been on a bike path when I wasn't passing people constantly. I can honestly say I've never been passed on a bike path. In the real world I'm horribly slow, but on a bike path I'm a hero.

    I guess it's something you get used to? To me it sounds basically like being stuck in traffic on the commute, which I could accomplish in a car without actually having to talk to people.

    So obviously for me, the etiquette rule is "don't go on the bike path, they will hate you."
    This whole post had me rolling.

  8. #8
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    ^^ Ditto. ROFL. Don't hold back Commuterboy tell us how you really feel!

    Exactly how I feel about the MUP in Columbus, Indiana. If that is a bike path I want no part of it. Hard to ride slow enough to be safe on it.

    Indiana law requires a bell which is a very nice warning that brings smiiles on the suburban roads, where there are no sidewalks, and the whole road is MUP. Doesn't pentrate loud earbud use. The 'on your left' call requires too much processing for peope in conversation, listenig to music, pushing strollers. Besides, Kathryn constantly tries the 'other left' schtick. Probably would have sent a drill sergeant into apoplexy. 'Coming round' seems to work well.

  9. #9
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    CB, this may be a "must buy" :

    It says "sumi-masen"("excuse me") in a little Japanese girl voice when you push one button. The other button produces a little synthesized Mozart. Mounts to handlebars. In black or translucent.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #10
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I don't want to develop an irrational hatred of little Japanese girls.


    If it had an Andre-The-Giant-From-The-Princess-Bride button "Everybody... MOVE!!!" and a Rage Against the Machine button, I'd be all over it.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  11. #11
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    Almost my entire commute is on the MUP that crosses my town.

    What I do:

    I rarely call out 'passing'. Most of the time, calling out passing does nothing because the person is wearing headphones. For the non-headphone-wearing crowd, most of the time the person will tense and/or steer in to you. The rest of the time it's uneventful. So I give A LOT of room to the passee. A LOT. Usually I'm well in the other lane, and I don't pass in corners.

    When I approach a family I slow down. I get annoyed when parents let their kids wander all over the place, but I understand kids are kids and you can't 100% control them. AND I would be PISSED if some cyclist came whipping by and hit my kid, hurting them. So I slow way down, smile, say hi to the kiddo(s) and continue on my way.

    The one user group I refuse to accommodate are dumb ass groups of kids who walk 4+-wide and literally occupy all of both paved lanes. I pass closely, in the dirt, at full speed, without warning. It's good for a laugh when they're lookin' hard while prowlin the trail and they pee their pants. No it's not the nicest thing to do, yes one day it will bite me in the ass . Until then, it's fun.
    :wq

  12. #12
    namagomi
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    Ring the bell, a lot... like all the time... slow down a little. Maintaining a good relationship is not my interest, i don't want to date them(don't lose sight of your goals). I want just for them get the hell out of my way and not cause a crash. BTW, there are some people you'll be forced to deal with... particularly women with large out of control dogs(that just want to jump allover your face nearly killing you in the process) who will also blame you for not signalling you were approaching 200yards(seriously) away and giving them time to calm the dog down. Man, what a **** that one was. You'd think a piece of work like her would be happy to cut something's balls off.

    I don't have problems with kids unless they're rolling around on the pavement, which sometimes happens.

    All in all, the MUP is an awful place to ride your bicycle if you're trying to get somewhere.

  13. #13
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    I think the reason many move to the left is 'left' is all they hear. So maybe their brain processes 'move' left?

    I use a bell. For me it has had better response and doesn't seem to confuse them.
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

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