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  1. #1
    You're killing me Smalls!
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    Securing Bike During the Work Day

    I have been lucky enough to park my bike in the office for the last 3 years. Our company has added several new employees and there is no longer room for me to bring the bike into the office. The only option we have to secure bikes is an outside bike rack. I am not really comfortable leaving my bike out there all day long. I have spoke to our building management several times about other options to no avail.

    How and where do you secure your bike during the work day?
    Marty

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I'm fortunate enough to have plenty of space at my work to stash my bike indoors, but I don't blame you for being hesitant to leave your bike outside. Hopefully the bike rack is in a visible spot with foot traffic that might deter a potential thief from trying to lift it. The only time I've ever had problems with leaving my bike at a bike rack was in school, and that was more vandalism and maliciousness. For now, all I can recommend is to lock it up good with a long cable that you can run through the whole frame and both wheels. Be sure and remove any easily removable items like lights, bags and quick-release seats! I don't know of the actual statistics, but from what I hear most bike thefts occur on college campuses!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  3. #3
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I'm a high school teacher and I keep it in the corner of the classroom on a hook. Rule number 1 in my class is "don't touch my bike". Touching my bike = detention. Last time a kid touched it I gave him detention, then took his cell phone and spent the whole rest of the period changing all of the settings, because if you touch my stuff, your stuff is fair game. My bike gets touched once, maybe twice in a school year.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  4. #4
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    I bring it into the basement. One thing I don't like is having to leave my bike out in the sun.

  5. #5
    Ridin' Dirty
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    I have a little extra room in my cubicle, so it just stands behind me.
    The building mgr installed a little cheasy bike rack outside, assuming wanting commuters like myself to leave our bikes outside. There's no way in hell I'd leave it outside all day long either.
    Let us know what you end up doing.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  6. #6
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    Try building management again

    I'm always surprised that folks have problems with building management not being helpful. Maybe I'm just lucky on that issue.

    If you get your employer on your side the bldg management may respond better - they like to have their tenants happy. Not sure what type of building it is, but if there is a parking garage attached it should have a place for bikes. Or perhaps near the loading dock / garbage area. Perhaps stress that they really don't have to do much to make you happy - just having an area inside with a steel rail to lock your bike onto...

    What about a neighboring building - ask their management about options.

    Good luck - I don't think I'd ride in if I didn't have a secure indoor area to park.

  7. #7
    You're killing me Smalls!
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    Thanks for the responses.

    I am working up a proposal for the bld. management to consider. It involves adding a bike rack to our parking garage that will not take up any parking spaces. The total cost is $600 and it includes installation. I have been told "No" once again by management at that cost. I plan on starting a petition around our office to see if I can nudge them in the right direction.
    Marty

  8. #8
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    On that note, see this thread (if you haven't already). Building Management said, "Park there and I'll cut your lock!"
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  9. #9
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    I've been pretty lucky the old shop I worked at the back room was big enough that my bike was rarely in the way and the only time it was outside w/o my permission was due to the backroom being cleaned then put back in so I didn't mind too much. the shop that I'm now (same company different location) I just took a corner of the pit between the swamp cooler unit and one of the oil tanks so again its outta the way and I've never heard anything even when the "big wigs" are there.

  10. #10
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    Canadian Gov't Building - Commuter Bike Storage

    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    I have been lucky enough to park my bike in the office for the last 3 years. Our company has added several new employees and there is no longer room for me to bring the bike into the office. The only option we have to secure bikes is an outside bike rack. I am not really comfortable leaving my bike out there all day long. I have spoke to our building management several times about other options to no avail.

    How and where do you secure your bike during the work day?
    As a Canadian Gov't employee, we have decent shower facilities and LOTS of bike racks, but LOTS OF THEFT too. They won't let us even lean our bikes on the building, let alone take it inside. If you even lean it against the building some guy will come and take your bike away and lock it up! Its wild!

    I once forgot something while preparing to leave for home at the end of the day, leaned the bike against the building, ran back inside. In 5 min my Colnago Road Bike was gone! I had a heart attack, it took me over an hour to find someone in the building who actually took it inside and impounded it in an underground garage!

    I then asked if they would do this for me every day if I left it against the building every morning , kind of like 'valet parking', and it would keep it out of the weather! ...It didn't go over well when I tried it the next day, the tried to keep it locked up for a few days.....

    I'm back in the rack now.....

    klunker2

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    I have been lucky enough to park my bike in the office for the last 3 years. Our company has added several new employees and there is no longer room for me to bring the bike into the office. The only option we have to secure bikes is an outside bike rack. I am not really comfortable leaving my bike out there all day long. I have spoke to our building management several times about other options to no avail.
    If you have to lock your bike in public, here is my contribution: how to lock your bike Note that you don't have to lug a massive top-rated lock with you, just leave it locked to something secure at work. If it's exposed to the elements, make sure you lube it periodically.



    I don't know what sort of bike you have, but as a starting point, the Kryptonite New York U-locks make a good primary lock to secure your rear wheel and frame with. For a secondary lock to secure the frame & front wheel to a second anchor point, the Kryptonite Keeper 880 chain, aka KryptoChain with the discus-shaped padlock is a possibility... not ultra-strong by itself, but flexible, and certainly more secure than a cable lock.

    If your main lock will be left at work, you could also consider the New York M-18WL that I mention on my web page there... it's over 7 pounds, but combines the shackle thickness of their Fahgettaboudit model with a longer shackle that increases your lockup options. Also useful for weight training!

    If you need something strong but not quite so expensive, look at the Kryptonite Evolution Series 4, which has the double-deadbolted action like the New Yorks, and a lighter (but still hardened) shackle.

    How and where do you secure your bike during the work day?
    I work at a bike shop, so I have it pretty easy in that regard


  12. #12
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    Get a Dahon Mup24 foldie. For a foldie is speedy enough and good enough to handle all terrain.

  13. #13
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    I'm friends with the lady here that runs the warehouse, so she's nice enough to let me leave my bike in there.

  14. #14
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    Our company has added several new employees and there is no longer room for me to bring the bike into the office.[/B]

    I found this statement to be pretty encouraging. Sorry I don't have any ideas for parking though.

  15. #15
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    Perks of the job.

    I work in a prison. My bike is surrounded by a 30 ft. fence topped with razor wire and three guards posted within 70 ft. I don't even bother locking it to the bike rack.
    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  16. #16
    You're killing me Smalls!
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    Well, I worked up a proposal with several options for the building management to consider. I also got 48 signatures from the tenants in the office building that would use a secure bike parking area. We will see!
    Marty

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I'm a high school teacher and I keep it in the corner of the classroom on a hook. Rule number 1 in my class is "don't touch my bike". Touching my bike = detention. Last time a kid touched it I gave him detention, then took his cell phone ...
    Wow. A bit uptight there, aren't we?

    I'm pretty free with my bikes. Anything someone can unadjust, I can adjust again. I have nice bikes, and I rather enjoy letting people ride them.

  18. #18
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    At work I typically do what most people have suggested and stash it inside. I work part time at a large department store and just leave it out of the way back in the dock area. I am the only one that commutes to work, so everyone knows that a bike belongs to me and we have cameras back there.

    While at college I lock to the bike rack, but due to the way the rack is designed and the big on guard U lock I use, I have to actually park the bike next to the rack in order to secure the frame to the rack.

    Commuting to the store around town here is another story all together. We have ZERO, and I mean literally NO bike racks except for at the library and bike shop. I am usually forced to ride the bike around a while and find a suitable pole or something to lock it to. Most of the time I try to look for gas/ water pipes in the back of stores or something like that.

  19. #19
    Killer of Chains
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    Ride a cheaper bike and use a cheaper lock.

    Until I lost it yesterday, I was locking up my free Schwinn LeTour with a my free Schwinn cable lock. I lost the lock yesterday, left it on the rack when I left home. Ugh.

    Does anyone doubt the Kryponite Flex-Cables? I couldn't see anyone at school really wanting to go to the trouble of cutting a cable in broad daylight for an otherwise worthless bike.

  20. #20
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    Wow. A bit uptight there, aren't we?

    I'm pretty free with my bikes. Anything someone can unadjust, I can adjust again. I have nice bikes, and I rather enjoy letting people ride them.
    It's all in good fun, but I work with 'at risk' kids....it's not like they want to 'adjust' something, it's more like razor blades in the tires, etc. Probably the worst a student has done is carve their gang name into my $80 seat. Not something I can just adjust back to normal. So yes, I'm a bit uptight.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  21. #21
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    My regular commuter looks fairly worthless. Truth be told I might have 150 or so in the bike, as I just built up the frame off of a nicer old fisher bike I had. The paint on my '91 Nishiki cascade is horrid. Its the putrid teal color that was prevalent in the 90's and I have had many people look think it was a department store bike. I absolutely love the bike- great commuter, and the fact that its ugly is just extra theft deterrent.

    I have thought about doing what you mentioned and just leaving the U-lock at home for a cheaper and easier cable lock of some sort. I know those locks arent difficult to defeat, but I really dont think too many people would want to waste their time with my commuter.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPeelinPbody
    Ride a cheaper bike and use a cheaper lock.

    Until I lost it yesterday, I was locking up my free Schwinn LeTour with a my free Schwinn cable lock. I lost the lock yesterday, left it on the rack when I left home. Ugh.

    Does anyone doubt the Kryponite Flex-Cables? I couldn't see anyone at school really wanting to go to the trouble of cutting a cable in broad daylight for an otherwise worthless bike.
    Cheap bike equal a poor performance bike which u can't reach yr workplace fast enough and not saving time.

    But i did use a cheap bike but swoop the wheelset with a performance one which is enough to buy me another decent performance bike.

    But so far it works for me. Except the wheelset, everything is cheap and no thief will think this is a performance bike.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    On that note, see this thread (if you haven't already). Building Management said, "Park there and I'll cut your lock!"
    Or better yet this one. Bailout has commuter benefits...

    But don't hold your breath waiting for that to happen. You might use it as fodder for the building management though.
    The future is not google-able. William Gibson

  24. #24
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    When I ride my commuter (a bianchi castro valley) I lock it up outside using a kyptonite new york chain lock and a Kryptonite U-Lock. I have pinhead locking skewers on the wheels and seat. I lock it up in the basement parking garage of my building on a city college campus.

    When I rode my mountain bike before I coulld bring it in the office I use the same kryptonite new york chain lock through the frame and bike rack, put a cable lock through the front wheel and frame, a cable through the seat and lock the together to the frame and bike rack wit hthe new york U-lock.



    For more pics: http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...ke-up-at-work/

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I'm a high school teacher and I keep it in the corner of the classroom on a hook. Rule number 1 in my class is "don't touch my bike". Touching my bike = detention. Last time a kid touched it I gave him detention, then took his cell phone and spent the whole rest of the period changing all of the settings, because if you touch my stuff, your stuff is fair game. My bike gets touched once, maybe twice in a school year.
    Awesome! Aloha Mr. Hand

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