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  1. #1
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    Seatpost mounted rack w/ panniers

    Anyone running panniers on a seatpost mounted rack? I have heard that the seatpost racks can slip and move side to side with panniers. I have a frame mounted rear rack now on my Surly Crosscheck but would like to get rid of it, if possible, due the hassle it presents when trying to do maintence on the brakes and rear der.

  2. #2
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    I haven't had any problems with my rear rack being in the way. I think a seatpost mounted rack is going to be a bigger hassle. Less weight capacity, moves all over. Not worth it.

  3. #3
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    The problem with...

    most seatpost mounted racks is their lack of stability, lower load capacity, and lack of side support for panier type bags. Nothing worse than having your panniers buzzing the tire when you turn or get a bit of side wind! There are post racks out there than have supports on the side to keep your bags out of the wheel etc., but they still have the other draw backs. I have a seatpost rack on my commuter with a trunk type bag and it works fine for me, I don't have that much stuff to take along on the commute, just some clothes, lunch and pocket junk. I'd use a frame mounted rack if I could, but the frame isn't set up for it. Anyway the biggest draw back to seatpost racks is the weight limit, 20 to 30lbs as compared to 40 to 60lbs for a frame rack. If you need the panniers it's better to have the higher load capacity. As for seatpost rack stability, I've found it depends on the attachment system. I haven't found a qr type system that works worth a hoot yet. One of the best that I've found is the Trek Interchange seatpost rack. It uses a four bolt clamp and shim mounting system that is quite stable as long as you stay within the load limit of 25lbs. The problem being they don't make a pannier compatable model. Delta makes a pannier compatable seatpost rack, but it's a QR type mounting system that will shift with a load on it.

    The bottom line is, if you need the panniers for bulk or load reasons then you are better off sticking with a frame mounted rack. They can be a hassle when it comes to maintenance, but you won't get a more stable system or as good a load capacity out of a seatpost rack.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    I had a post mounted rack that was rated for 40 lbs and had side supports. It did move about though, and because it was off the seatpost, it was very high up and raised the centre of gravity. I'd def stick with a nice frame mounted rack in the future.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigrocks
    Anyone running panniers on a seatpost mounted rack? I have heard that the seatpost racks can slip and move side to side with panniers. I have a frame mounted rear rack now on my Surly Crosscheck but would like to get rid of it, if possible, due the hassle it presents when trying to do maintence on the brakes and rear der.
    a rear seatpost quick release pannier rack.
    Im using a Axiom- first time I use it it shifted all over-
    I tried rubber shims, aluminum cans, and finally a shim for a threadless stem adapter.
    I then thought to use leverage on the quick release. I used a breaker bar I made out of pipe (for changing my truck tires or putting on my socket wrenches for tight bolts.
    So, I tighten the quick release as much by hand going clockwise, then I put the pipe over the quick release handle and keep going clockwise and then using the pipe I lock the quick release. I then will go maybe in halfturns and lock the quickrelease again until its snug and does not shift to me trying to move it.

    My pipe is about 2 ft long so its tons of leverage- maybe use old handle bars or something if you dont have a pipe. Keep it mind you have to pay attention to locking it as it can bend stuff so ease loosen it in half turns until you think it won't bend the quickrelease. This is probably not recommended and may overtime put some extra weat on the quick release but atleast now my pannier bags do not shift which scares me when I ride. Mountain Equipment Co-op www.mec.ca has quick release for seats so if mine does go then I would use this to replace the quick release it over time it wears.
    It also serves as a deterent to someone stealing your rack if your grocery shopping since its on so bloody tight.

    I have had bums/thieves around my bike before and I would love to see the them try and take off this with their hands. I guess you can also replace the quickrelease with a nut and bolt?
    Hope that helps lemme know- I otherwise thought my seatpost rack was garbage, but now I can use it safely and wouldn't ever use it before.
    I would otherwise not recommend seatpost pannier bag style if you are just hand tightening- your load will shift and will be a liability in traffic if you like to go fast.
    If you need pictures lemme know.
    Additional:
    I cut a seatpost aluminum shim (2.5 inches) and put this where the rear pannir mount goes. Using the pipe I tighten and close the lever and its rock solid now- though I imagine you need to keep your load balanced. There is some squeak so I will need to silicon or grease around here to get rid of the noise.

    Paul
    Last edited by Neumann; 06-10-2009 at 10:57 AM.

  6. #6
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    I use a seat post mounted rack (not a QR) that has side supports for panniers. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...9_10000_201391. I mounted it with a piece of rubber between the rack and the post and then tightened the four bolts down in a pattern and haven't had any problem with it slipping yet. Rack is rated for 25 lbs, so I bought small panniers to keep me from overloading it. I also have a trunk bag. Usually I am carrying a change of clothes (shorts, t-shirt, and sandals), a few books, a U-Lok and other misc small stuff. I never had any other rack so I can't compare, but I got about 400 miles so far and no troubles. It definetly does raise the center of gravity and also with the trunk bag I have to throw my leg real high to mount the bike or lay the bike over and step over the top tube.

  7. #7
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    I also use a seat post mounted rack with side supports and I have never had an issue with it moving from side to side. I would, however, run a frame mounted rack if I could to lower my COG but my frame doesn't have bolt eyelets. I use my rack every day to carry a trunk bag. My trunk bag usually weighs between 5 and 10 pounds. About once a week, I use a pannier bag to take clothes to and from work. My pannier bag is usually about 10 pounds when it is full of clothes. Most of the time I use a pannier bag, I only use one bag and I still have never had an issue with my rack moving around. My rack also came with a strip of rubber that sits between the rack and the seatpost.
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  8. #8
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    Axiom makes racks that don't require mounts.

    http://www.axiomgear.com/products/ge...ar-suspension/

  9. #9
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    I use the Topeak seat post rack and removable pannier. It is a great setup. I shimmed the mount with a old tube. I hardly moves at all. I highly recommend it for light loads. I carry tubes, first aid kit, lock and misc. stuff as needed.
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  10. #10
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    Rear Pannier seat rack

    Can you show how you put this on- since in my experience the pannier bags/rack would shift if you hit bumps or did any hard pedaling standing upright. Tire tube shims didn't work a damn for me.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neumann
    Can you show how you put this on- since in my experience the pannier bags/rack would shift if you hit bumps or did any hard pedaling standing upright. Tire tube shims didn't work a damn for me.
    I basically cut a length of mtb tube and wrapped it around the seatpost. Then taped it in place with electrical tape. I tighten down the clasp as tight as I can to cinch down on the tube. It holds it pretty tight to where it will not sway at all cranking up some steep inclines. Sorry, the picture does not show much other than the clasp set up.
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  12. #12
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    I used a Performance transit seatpost rack (for-pannier design) for several years on several mountain bikes with no eyelets. With one pannier it would indeed swing the rack to the side, especially with something heavy like a 12 pack. Using two panniers gave no problem, and even better was a basket on the top. The rack did, however, fail in action. The aluminium strut broke all the way through, dropping the rack and its load onto my rear wheel. I think the thinnish tubing of the strut was simply not as strong as the frame mounted racks. I've never had a failure with a frame mounted rack, in decades of fully loaded touring.

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