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  1. #1
    Hey, wait up!
    Reputation: LCdaveH's Avatar
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    Seat post racks ??

    I've been rehabilitating my neglected road bike to use in my 27 mile each way commute to work. Mostly along rural, reasonably bike friendly back roads.

    On my MTB, I've also been getting tired of all the stuff I stuff into my seat bag and Camelbak.for my singletrack sojourns.

    I've been looking at getting a quick release seatpost mount rack to swap between the full suss MTB and the road ride.

    Which brought me to the question of a "E-Type," "V-Type" and "A-Type" racks.







    I could find no explanation of the differences or specific applications for these different types. Since this will be a mail order production, I'd like to get the right thing the first time around.

    ALSO, is it feasible to use a seatpost rack on a MTB for bouncy/bumpy trail rides? I'm just going to carry at most two tubes, CO2 stuff, hand pump, multi-tool, levers, patches, camera, bike light and battery, and other small items.

    Thx for any enlightenment.

    .d.
    In best Klingon voice: Today is a good day to ride!

    New Mexico Off Road Series

    Dirt Rocks!

    Let Go, and Let Bike.

  2. #2
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH

    I've been looking at getting a quick release seatpost mount rack to swap between the full suss MTB and the road ride.

    Which brought me to the question of a "E-Type," "V-Type" and "A-Type" racks.



    I could find no explanation of the differences or specific applications for these different types. Since this will be a mail order production, I'd like to get the right thing the first time around.
    I've got this Topeak rack that I use with my FS 29er... It works well, you can put a rack trunk on there to securely carry all your light stuff (as well as a change of clothes when you're commuting...), or simply strap stuff down to the rack itself. It takes a bit of fiddling around to get the rubber washers and the tension on the seatpost clamp just right so that it doesn't wiggle around on you when you're off-road.

    The second rack you show has the support racks for when you attach panniers to your seatpost rack. You didn't mention a need for panniers, but they are convenient to have and use for when you really need to haul freight. I've got the matching stays for my Topeak rack and have used them a couple of time, but for the past couple of months I've used a regular Euro-style commuter bike for commuting and errands, and just added a regular rear rack to my hardtail to make it my backup commuter... saving the 29er for pure trail & fun riding, or when bad weather on my commute route (which has a long stretch of singletrack in it if I want to take the short cut) makes it advisable to have the big knobby tires.

    The one thing I have found this year in making more utilitarian uses of my MTBs is that full suspension may not be the best choice for a commuter or utility bike if you are going to be using a rear rack. Given the road/trail/pavement conditions here in Little Rock, a hardtail makes the ideal commuter because of the wheels & big tires (singletrack in a lot of places here is as good or better than the pavement), gearing (we're blessed with lots of hills) and overall comfort.

    Tom

  3. #3
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    A few of things that I have found.....

    First a seat post mounted rack when loaded significantly changes the center of gravity of the bike upwards. While this is not a big deal and is easy to get used to on the road, it is VERY disconcerting on the trail where body english and bike movement are important parts of manuvering the bike in rough terrain. It would really surprise you at how much of an effect just addinig 5lbs of wieght that high up on the bike has on how the bike handles, and it's not an effect to the good either. For off road I stick with a small seat bag on the bike and the rest in the Camel Back

    The second is, QR mounted seat racks move. I don't care how tight you get the QR clamp at some point they will move off center during a ride. Topeak makes some of the best QR seatpost racks with the least amount of problems in this respect, but they still aren't perfect. They'll do well on the road, but on the trail I dare say they'd move over the course of a single ride in many cases. A bolt on rack would be a better choice if you can find one. I have a rack that I picked up at a local shop quite some time ago that has been great as far as stability. It uses a four bolt split clamp mounting system that is quite secure, but I still wouldn't use it for off road. Also with the rough terrain of off road you'd be looking at the possibility of overload on the rack due to the bumps. Most seatpost racks are rated in the 20 to 25lb range. Put six pounds of crap in a bag on one and it wouldn't take to much of a bump to cause the inertia of the load to run over that. They aren't designed for off road use.

    And finally, no matter what you do, seat post mounted racks creak in most cases. Even the bolt on models will. Grease up the seat post to elimnate the creak and your setting yourself up for rack movement, not enough grip between the shim, clamp, and seat post to prevent it. A thin rubber shim or inner tube cut to fit under the shim often helps. But it'll still creak under the right conditions.

    Anyway, for the commute any of the Topeak racks that you have listed will work fine. But leave it on the commuter. I wouldn't put any rack, frame or seatpost mounted on an a bike and then ride it off road, at least not very agressively. The added weight, change in cetenter of gravity, and resulting change in handling characteristics of the bike just aren't worth it. The key here isn't the weight itself, but where you put it.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    Try the Axiom Odyssee. It is not quick release though. I just installed and used it on my super caliber 29er. I went from the topeak MtX rack. When loaded with panniers the topeak QR moved A lot

  5. #5
    Another Retro Grouch
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
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    I bought a bolt on, it holds tight:
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