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Thread: Which Saddle

  1. #1
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    Which Saddle

    What is a good,comfy saddle for commuting where you have to wear your street/work cloths? My old Titec Berserkr DH is my favorite, But not without the padded undies I wear. I don't have time after work to strip down and put on dedicated bike clothing below the waist,never mind there is no real changing room/area. So has anybody found a good saddle that works without padding that isn't over stuffed and slows you down?
    Thanks for your response in advance.

  2. #2
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    Bontrager SSR. $25 and a good mix of width, support, and padding. Its what is on 2 of my bikes, a brooks imperial is on the other, which is great too, but 4X the cost of the SSR.

  3. #3
    ride the moment
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    I can ride a WTB Pure V in jeans for a couple hours and feel great. Your @ss might be different.
    Just because you read a book it don't make you conscious. - MC Lush

  4. #4
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    IMHO and experience, this is first about miles in the commute, after that handlebar height. I get away with blue jeans and tighty whiteys in one way distance round trips of up to about 5 miles with shopping or work between rides. I have used the cubicle in the mens' room as an impromtu changing room, but some are not suitable for that.

    A Brooks B17 is supposed to be best with seat level bars, but for me, the bars have to be higher, more in the range of a B67 for best comfort. For level bars and the drops, I have a Brooks Pro saddle on the other bike. I have a pair of padded undershorts that can go under street clothes and they are good to about a 15 mile oneway distance errand run, but you'd not want to get sweaty and wear them all day, and they don't hide blue jean seams totally. In college, I rode the equivalent of a B17 narrow in normal street clothes and got some 20 mile rides in (one way) with no major pains. Must have built up calluses. I'd not try that now.

  5. #5
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    I don't have this issue, but one thing that comes to mind is that some street clothes are apt to be more comfy than others...maybe something with some stretch or gusseted seams like Gramiccis have would make a difference...something to consider next time you need to buy some street clothes. Regular jeans are probably the least comfy after the fewest miles.

  6. #6
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    I second the WTB - their shells seems to fit lots of people very well, and can be had cheaply. I recommend either the Speed V, or the Comfort V. For a little more coin, the Brooks B17 has a magical ability to fit almost everyone, and the leather is a bit slick so your pants will chafe less.

  7. #7
    a lazy pedaler
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    I've been riding my Brooks Flyer with padded shorts for a long time...last Saturday when changing the setup on la pugsdozer for the race I did it without my padded shorts and even though I may have rode just a couple of miles, the feeling with normal shorts was great.

    I actually was going to start a thread about this, I've been thinking if the padding for a 6 mile commute is really needed... I rode today without them on my bontrager saddle (don't know which model since it came with the 09 4500) and it was doable. My couple of padded shorts are really wearing out due to the continuous washings each commute week

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I have a Specialized saddle that came stock on my Hardrock. Too soft for extended trail riding in padded shorts, but it's about right for commuting. Quality's not great, but hard to beat the price.

    I think it's all about shell shape. The Specialized saddle I'm using has a very similar flat-topped shape (aside from a groove that doesn't really do anything) to my favorite saddle. Incidentally, also a Bontrager - the Bontrager 3D, which was made for them by Selle San Marco. If you can match the shape, more-or-less, but get the saddle in a slightly more padded version, that's probably the way to go. I have about a half hour commute lately; I just hop on my bike in my jeans, or whatever I'm wearing, and do it.

    If you're interested in saving some money while you're at it, ask your bike shop about new bike takeoffs. A lot of shops have a bin full of saddles that people replace before they even leave the store.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    I like my WTB Speed V for my 25 mile round trip daily commute as well as trails on the weekend. My girlfriend has the 'Speed V She' on her bike, and seems happy with it for her 22 mile commute as well.

  10. #10
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    Regarding Brooks saddles; mine's honey-colored, and it has discolored some light-grey baggy cycling shorts I have...probably from the proofide? Nearly impossible to wash out, and not sure how noticeable it is off the bike, just something to consider.

  11. #11
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    If rain isn't an issue I would go with leather,it's by far the most comfortable material. Personally I use Gyes saddles they're almost as good as the Brooks Saddles and around half the price. However if you're a light rider it may be disadvantageous because they use a somewhat hard leather.

    If you're light (under 150 lbs) I would suggest going with a persons leather saddle. It's not as well made as the Gyes but it uses a softer leather so it will reconform to your physiology more easily for you are a light rider.

  12. #12
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    Brooks for the win!

    I'm sure it's been said once already, but you can't go wrong with a Brooks saddle. The B17 standard is the best bang for anyone's buck, and honestly if you have to sit on it a lot it's worth a little extra up front, and the payoff is you get a great saddle that only gets better with age!

  13. #13
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    Saddles are a crap shoot. I've ridden many. You really can't take anyones advice on what is best as far as comfort is concerned.

    A perfect example is the brooks B17 saddle. It happens to to be one of the most uncomfortable saddles I have ever ridden. It was years ago that I tried it on the advice of a LBS. Even after a year of suffering with this saddle, I could not adjust to it. It's a horrible saddle. I could only ride maybe 2 miles before it started to hurt bad.

    Your best bet is to have a LBS measure your sit bones. This will help narrow down your choices. There are dozens of saddles that will fit your sit bones but probably only a few of them will feel "just right". Remember too, cost has no bearing on comfort - you can't use that as a guide.

    .Also note too, that an improperly adjusted saddle can cause much discomfort. So one needs to experiment with the tilt.

    I'm not saying that BassBiker is wrong about his glowing opinion of the brooks saddle, because he's not. But my opinion is just as valid.

    Saddle reviews are meaningless too as far as the comfort aspect is concerned. They can't even be used as a rough guide.

    Sorry for not being much help, but that's just the way things are.

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