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  1. #1
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    Rigid Fork Advice, Please?

    Not sure which forum this should go in, but I thought I'd start here, since you guys tend toward the practical (that's a good thing).

    I recently found and bought an older ('94 - '97) Dean Colonel frame, which will get most of its use on pavement and gravel/dirt back roads here in north Georgia.

    I'd like to try a rigid fork on it. I've been riding it with the susp fork locked out, and it's fine, but heavier than necessary. And I'd like to get back to the simplicity of a rigid fork.

    Can you recommend a good, aftermarket fork? I'd like to keep my BB7 front disk, and the bike was designed around a fork with 63mm travel, and 435mm axle-to-crown measurement.

    All ideas appreciated.

  2. #2
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
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    I'd recommend a carbon fork. They're available on ebay for relatively cheap. I bought a SASO carbon fork, looks like the same exact fork as the WB forks, just a helluva lot cheaper. Probably comes from the same factory. Nuther one would be "exotic" on ebay, or just go here: http://www.carboncycles.cc/?s=0&t=2&
    Amolan

  3. #3
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    Dang your using a dean colonel as your commuter!?! What are your normal rides?

  4. #4
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    I asked my question here because I know lots of commuters prefer rigid forks, and I wasn't sure which other forum to post to. And no, I'm not really a commuter, since I'm semi-retired and my commute would be 40+ miles round-trip on cycling-unfriendly roads.

    But I do like day-long rides a little north of here, where there are still dirt/gravel roads and little-used paved roads, and the opportunity to get off on fire roads and the occasional singletrack.

    The Colonel was the result of haunting Craigslist for months. I bought it as a bare frame (got a great deal; the frame is an older one, built sometime between 1994 and 1997) and built it out of parts I mostly already had. It's a lotta bang for the buck. I know people who spend more on cigarettes in a year than this bike cost me.

    It seems to be the perfect ride for what I like to do- efficient, comfortable for all-day rides, and more than willing to go wherever it's pointed. I run it with Maxxis Holy Rollers at 55 psi. They seem to have fairly low rolling resistance; my only complaint about them is that they pick up and fling more water than any other tire I've ever used. Looking into fenders for it now.

    Believe me, if I was commuting on it, it would be chained to my left ankle.

    Now, if it was you, what fork would you want?


    Quote Originally Posted by Chello
    Dang your using a dean colonel as your commuter!?! What are your normal rides?

  5. #5
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    Where are the phots?!

    Forks ... never bought a rigid mtb fork before but if its Ti (??) then i would spend the cash on a Ti fork, which probably means custome framebuilder (like Blacksheep?)

    Maybe a White Brothers Carbon Fibre One?

  6. #6
    Frt Range, CO
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    Carbon, Ti, sheesh, how about a nice steel Salsa Chromoto, comes in two 26'er sizes and cost ~$100. Here's a bunch of choices.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...hp?category=85

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/1...ks.aspx?s=1618

  7. #7
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Congrats on your CL score! Now for rigid 26" forks, you might want to try Jenson USA or Nashbar. I would be inclined to go with steel myself, but that's just me.

    On the subject of fenders, I would recommend Planet Bike Freddy Fenders Hardcore. They are super light weight, include mud flaps and provide full coverage in sloppy weather. The 60mm size should work nicely with your Holy Rollers.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  8. #8
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    Surly 1x1 fork.

  9. #9
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    I use the Nashbar Rigid ATB fork on my commuter (on sale now for $60). I bought it last year on sale for $40. Nice fork for that price. But again the Salsa or Surly forks are much nicer for not much more $. Then again a carbon fork would look nice...

    It all depends on how you look at the bike. Basic commuter - go Nashbar. Work of art/special bike - go Salsa or carbon.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by maelgwn
    Where are the phots?!

    Forks ... never bought a rigid mtb fork before but if its Ti (??) then i would spend the cash on a Ti fork, which probably means custome framebuilder (like Blacksheep?)

    Maybe a White Brothers Carbon Fibre One?
    Ti would be ideal, and there are some beautiful ti forks out there that I would sell my firstborn for, but they're way beyond the scope of this project, which is to build a nice, utilitarian bike on a budget.

    The White Brothers Carbon Fibre fork looks good, but is it worth three times the price of the Salsa CroMoto? I dunno, especially since I don't even know if it'll turn out to be what I want. It's been a looong time since I rode a rigid fork!

    I'm adding all these to The List, though. Maybe if we get that Economic Stimulus in the Spring I can go nuts!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter
    Carbon, Ti, sheesh, how about a nice steel Salsa Chromoto, comes in two 26'er sizes and cost ~$100. Here's a bunch of choices.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...hp?category=85

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/1...ks.aspx?s=1618
    Yeah, I've looked at the CroMoto. I think that's probably a good place to start. I'd hate to drop (can't afford to drop) $300+ with the possibility that I wouldn't like it.

    Some others in those links look good, too, but they're names I'm not familiar with. Time to do some more research.

  12. #12
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    Is it a Ti frame? (Or am I totally mistaken in my 10s of googleing)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by commo_soulja
    I'd recommend a carbon fork. They're available on ebay for relatively cheap. I bought a SASO carbon fork, looks like the same exact fork as the WB forks, just a helluva lot cheaper. Probably comes from the same factory. Nuther one would be "exotic" on ebay, or just go here: http://www.carboncycles.cc/?s=0&t=2&
    How's the SASO working for you? Are you seeing any brake chatter? Are you running V's or disk?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    Congrats on your CL score! Now for rigid 26" forks, you might want to try Jenson USA or Nashbar. I would be inclined to go with steel myself, but that's just me.

    On the subject of fenders, I would recommend Planet Bike Freddy Fenders Hardcore. They are super light weight, include mud flaps and provide full coverage in sloppy weather. The 60mm size should work nicely with your Holy Rollers.
    I'm definitely leaning toward the Hardcore fenders. I got no eyelets on the rear dropouts, though. Are they adaptable enough to use the collars that clamp around the seatstays for mounting?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by maelgwn
    Is it a Ti frame? (Or am I totally mistaken in my 10s of googleing)
    It is Ti, but I'm afraid it's not a shiney showpiece build. Emphasis is on utility and durability, with an eye on budget. She's gonna get some mud on her.

  16. #16
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    Edit: Sorry, duplicate post..
    Last edited by seawind161; 01-30-2009 at 03:12 PM. Reason: Duplicate Post

  17. #17
    jrm
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    Is the geo suspension corrected?

    The Kona Project II is a good solid fork.
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by seawind161
    How's the SASO working for you? Are you seeing any brake chatter? Are you running V's or disk?
    I've got the SASO fork on my rigid mt bike with cable disc brakes. I've ridden it several times on mountain bike trails and it's light and takes the edge off some of the small stuff. I haven't noticed any brake chatter. Overall, I'm happy with it. Makes for a light simple bike.

    If your bike doesnt have eyelets for fenders, you can use the Planet Bike EZ fenders. I'm using them on my commuter and they're easy to install and solid. Also love the full fender coverage.
    Amolan

  19. #19
    Frt Range, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by seawind161
    ...Some others in those links look good, too, but they're names I'm not familiar with. Time to do some more research.
    Why bother? Salsa has two axle to crown versions, no hassles. I have the 29er version, it's really nice, the dropouts and cast, not stamped like on the Suley forks.

  20. #20
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Kona P2. Good Call!

    That was the only 'non-generic' rigid fork in the game for years.

    Until rigid got trendy.
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  21. #21
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    Fork Followup

    Thanks to all who offered advice here.

    I ended up finding a White Bros Rock Solid carbon fork locally, used but in brand new condition, and for a good price, and I went for it. I'm not usually a fan of carbon, and I think (thought?) that most of the time it is a material looking for an application, but I looked at it and researched it and bought it.

    And I have to say, I'm really happy with it. If I was bombing through rock gardens with it, I would still prefer steel, but for what this bike is used for, it's near perfect- light, stiff, somewhat compliant on the smaller bumps, and very precise.

    BTW, it is 445mm A-C, and seems to have had no negative impact on handling.

    Life is Good!

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