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  1. #1
    Devo
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    power of the Camera...

    i've been carrying a digi cam for sometime simply to document things
    also used a Hero cam

    but check this out!

    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  2. #2
    Devo
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    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  3. #3
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    Good news segment, kudos to all involved.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  4. #4
    Devo
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    Hit and Run victim Daniel Vasquez (cross link)
    Hit-and-run victim Daniel Vasquez
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  5. #5
    I Have Cookies
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    Nice Segment...... +1
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

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  6. #6
    Dropshot Champ!
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    nicely done man!

  7. #7
    viva la v-brakes!
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    That snow plow incident came up in discussion here in WI when it happened last winter. It seemed like he was baiting the plow driver. I mean, I ride all winter too, but I am reasonable enough to get out of the way of a snow plow and let them do their job. This was the general consensus of the local forum I was on.

    Some of those near misses that he starts yelling at aren't so near. Don't get me wrong, I thing drivers getting too close to cyclists is a real issue and they piss me off too. But being aggressive and yelling at everyone who passes you by is no way to make allies to the cycling cause.

    Basically, this guy lost cred with me with the ridiculous snow-plow incident.
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  8. #8
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    That snow plow incident came up in discussion here in WI when it happened last winter. It seemed like he was baiting the plow driver. I mean, I ride all winter too, but I am reasonable enough to get out of the way of a snow plow and let them do their job. This was the general consensus of the local forum I was on.

    Some of those near misses that he starts yelling at aren't so near. Don't get me wrong, I thing drivers getting too close to cyclists is a real issue and they piss me off too. But being aggressive and yelling at everyone who passes you by is no way to make allies to the cycling cause.

    Basically, this guy lost cred with me with the ridiculous snow-plow incident.
    if he was pulling his buddy on a snow board...
    then i'd know he was up to something
    www.AsanaCycles.com
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  9. #9
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Yes, the snow plow incident was downright asinine. And what's all the yelling going to prove? Those people in their cars aren't even going to hear him and probably don't care anyway. If it bothers you so much, then don't ride on a busy highway. Safe route planning is just as important to your skill set as riding in a straight line.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    Yes, the snow plow incident was downright asinine. And what's all the yelling going to prove? Those people in their cars aren't even going to hear him and probably don't care anyway. If it bothers you so much, then don't ride on a busy highway. Safe route planning is just as important to your skill set as riding in a straight line.
    I couldn't agree with you more. This individual is nothing more than an antagonizer putting more bike commuters at risk because of his actions. The last clip before the end said it all to me. He had eight feet to the right of him and still he chose to ride left of the line.

  11. #11
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    could you please tell me what kind of camera Jeff is using? I'd like to put on my bike as well. Thank you.

  12. #12
    nothing relevant to say
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    The most scary part of that video was in the last 10 seconds....

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    Yes, the snow plow incident was downright asinine. And what's all the yelling going to prove? Those people in their cars aren't even going to hear him and probably don't care anyway. If it bothers you so much, then don't ride on a busy highway. Safe route planning is just as important to your skill set as riding in a straight line.

    I also agree- and for the record, how many people in here ride in that manner?? I know for sure on busy roads like that I will go as far right as I can- I saw sometimes a very large swath of shoulder that he wasnt using. Granted, riding on the shoulder can suck but I would rather have a crappy ride than becoming a hood ornament.

    I commend the guy for what he is doing, but on a few occasions he simply reminded me of roadies doing "training rides" where they act like they are the only people on the road. While I enjoy courteous drivers, and expect a little bit of give and take, I have noticed that people generally see a cyclist on the road as a simple obstacle to overtake- or have the opinion that you dont belong there in the first place. Riding deliberately into traffic instead of at the far right probably doesnt appear too good to your typical driver that could care less about you. Yelling at close calls probably only makes it worse. I know Indiana law states that the cyclist must ride as far to the right as safely possible- which may be the angle the police are taking in that one incident.

    While riding in traffic doesnt intimidate me, you have to be wise about your decisions. One small slip up can KILL us. choosing low-traffic roads, riding on the shoulder, being as conspicuous and courteous as possible to drivers is part of my formula for road survival.
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  14. #14
    maker of trail
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    Sometimes there also simply isn't room for 3ft clearance, a bike and on coming traffic.

    As both a driver and a cyclist, I get annoyed when its a tight road, with high volume of traffic in both directions and then you get some dude on bike on the road trying to prove a point when he has 4ft of perfectly clear shoulder to ride on. Its called consideration.

  15. #15
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    Where i live, its not even safe for cars to be on the roads during winter. I took one ride about 2 days after the first storm and slide sideways enough times for me to park the bike for a few months. I hardly even seen a snow plow often enough to be worried. They will plow the same 2 street three times before they plow in front of my place, and i Iive downtown. Hopefully though the snow will be gone in a few days so I get back on the dangerous roads with my bicycle again.

  16. #16
    viva la v-brakes!
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    Quote Originally Posted by essenmeinstuff
    Sometimes there also simply isn't room for 3ft clearance, a bike and on coming traffic.
    Not that I intend to defend this guy, but... If there isn't room to allow 3 ft of clearance then you need to wait to pass until there is. You wouldn't pass another car or motorcycle on a narrow road with oncoming traffic, would you? As for the shoulder thing, if its paved and free of debris, then yeah, there's no reason he shouldn't be riding over there. Perhaps it needs to be cleaned of debris, which can be more of a safety hazard than riding in traffic. And a gravel shoulder is not an acceptable alternative, they make riding slow, difficult and unsafe. Though in an effort to be courteous to other road users I have been known to bail to a gravel shoulder, driveway, etc in order to allow room for cars waiting behind me politely to pass. The problem with Mr. Fringes is he needs to be courteous if expects courtesy from others.


    Quote Originally Posted by lifelesspoet
    Where i live, its not even safe for cars to be on the roads during winter. I took one ride about 2 days after the first storm and slide sideways enough times for me to park the bike for a few months.
    Studded tires give amazing traction in winter. I have much more control than car drivers do on slick days. So I am able to keep myself upright and going in a straight line no problem. The only trick is then to stay out of the way of people who insist on driving when conditions don't allow safe operation of their vehicle.
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  17. #17
    maker of trail
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    Thats the issue, its never cut and dry, there are so many variables to consider.

    The main point I guess is that ALL road users need to be aware of their surroundings, and interact actively with other road users. I see it all too often, whether its other drivers, cyclists or pedestrians, that are in their own little oblivious bubble and don't give any consideration what so ever to the other people on the road around them. Whether its the guy that doesn't pull into a clear passing lane on the highway to let people on from an on ramp, or the cyclist that rides in and out of parked cars, or rides straight through an intersection on the outside of the right turning lane, or the pedestrian that walks out onto a crosswalk on a snowy night with out looking hoping cars will be able to magically stop for them etc etc etc.

    That snow plow thing was just ridiculous, even as a driver you get out of the way of the plow trucks... Its their job to clear the road so you can ride/drive safer, you see one coming, you let them do their job!

    As a side note, one of the more worry some things to see in your rear view mirror on the high way is snow plows in formation in all lanes closing in on you at 80-90k and you have no where to go lol.

  18. #18
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by essenmeinstuff
    Sometimes there also simply isn't room for 3ft clearance, a bike and on coming traffic.

    As both a driver and a cyclist, I get annoyed when its a tight road, with high volume of traffic in both directions and then you get some dude on bike on the road trying to prove a point when he has 4ft of perfectly clear shoulder to ride on. Its called consideration.
    I'm glad that most of you agree with me. I'm not trying to be a know-it-all here, but I also feel that riding as far to the right as possible is another item that is lacking in many riders skill sets. Some cyclists find it dangerous or downright demeaning. I feel that it is an invaluable skill. There are some situations where it's not only practical to ride way over to the right, but also only practical thing to do and regardless of how you feel about it you should be comfortable doing it. Then again, unlike most cyclists who are roadies I am a mountain biker at heart and I see every ride as an opportunity to practice some skill that may prove invaluable on the trail; Riding as close to the curb as possible without smacking a pedal on said curb, maintaining a straight line in tight quarters, avoiding debris, riding over debris, etc..... Also forces you to be really aware of your environment. Sure, you're afraid of getting doored. I've been doored before, live and learn. If necessary, I ride as close to parked cars as possible while watching for signs that they're occupied. I try to look at dangers and hazards as an opportunity to learn and practice something new, rather than an inconvenience to gripe about or blame some else for.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  19. #19
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    It is really interesting to read the comments here and then go to the roadbikereview.com forums and read the comments there (not on the same video, mind you). The lane-entitlement thing seems to be a huge deal over there. Cyclists there frequently brag about moving left and taking the entire lane blocking traffic. It's no wonder so many people can't stand bikes.

    Gary, you are spot on. To me...picking a safe route is key...and getting out of the way is also vital. I've added a couple miles to my ride just to go down quiet residential streets where there is almost no traffic.

    I also do everything I can to improve the image of cyclists every time I ride. I give a wave to people who stop for me, I smile and say "Hi" to pedestrians, etc. I also ride as far right as I can unless the road is a total mess...and yes, I commute on a cross bike with skinny tires.

    If I have some extra money laying around, I might grab a camera though. I'd only look at it when I had a close call...most of the time I'd just record over it. Also, it would be nice to have for trail riding.

    Anyone got any camera suggestions for this purpose?

  20. #20
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    Thank you SOOO mch for posting this! And that one scene realy got me, where the cop on the bike is asking, "sure you have the right , but do you really wanna take the risk??" Hmmm, well sure, I do have the right..the real question is, do I really want to risk operating a HUGE vehicle that pollutes the air that we BREATHE and FUELS the oil coflict in the middle east and contributes to the GLOBAL WARMING CRISIS in general? Hmm, Well, Should I risk ALL THAT???? Hmmm, tough question....
    Peace Love Bicycles

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    That snow plow incident came up in discussion here in WI when it happened last winter. It seemed like he was baiting the plow driver. I mean, I ride all winter too, but I am reasonable enough to get out of the way of a snow plow and let them do their job. This was the general consensus of the local forum I was on.
    I had the same incident, I was on a road and there right behind me I saw the plowmobile, nowhere to go, I was thinking f*ck, turned out the plow stayed behind me until I turned onto the next road. Scandinavia. We all got jobs to do, but we all have brains too.
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  22. #22
    iRonic
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    I've found the best solution is to ride in the middle of the lane. I started riding at the far right side, like in the video, but after some really close calls, it was obvious to me that if you leave room enough to barely squeeze through, motorists take it. And then some. It's a clash of indecision and confusion on both parts. After I started doing this, I take control over when and where they pass. If it's safe, then I'll move over a bit so they can get around easier (and force more distance between us). Otherwise, they just have to wait a bit longer to get around me. By riding on the far right like that, it's almost as if a cyclist is telling motorists "Yeah... I don't have any right to be here, so I'll timidly give you the rest of the lane to try and squeak by.". By riding in the middle, it takes the 'squeak by' option out of the equation.

    Every now and then someone might honk or yell out the window, but....

    I'd much rather be leading a line of cussing motorists on a bicycle, rather than leading a line of weeping motorists in a hearse.
    Ron

  23. #23
    maker of trail
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassTrain
    I've found the best solution is to ride in the middle of the lane.
    For sure, there are times in traffic, esp in multi lane intersections etc, where you have to take your place on the road, and that means taking your lane. I just make sure as soon as its clear and safe, that I let traffic behind me resume with minimal disturbance.

    As a driver I have a lot more respect for the cyclist that takes his/her spot in traffic ie in the middle of the lane, behaves according to the rules of the road, and once they have left the intersection, resume being out of the way.

  24. #24
    Devo
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    people have rights
    not vehicles

    auto mobiles compared to bicycles, have the greater liability.

    this kind of stuff is kind of like cold war tactics
    that is...
    due to the mass anonymity of being behind glass and steel
    with the addition of power and speed...

    we are able to be in guise
    therefor a degree of distancing

    you can go on and on about this kind of stuff

    I'm a combat vet
    check out this book
    http://www.amazon.com/Killing-Psycho.../dp/0316330116

    basically there are 3 types of distancing that need to occur in order to help facilitate this behavior

    1. Psychological
    2. Physical
    3. Social

    forgive the gross the analogy
    so it basically goes like this...

    its very difficult to disembowel your offspring from groin to chest with an antler horn.
    the Psychological, Physical and Social effects are too damaging

    its much easier to neutralize a target from 30,000ft. i.e. Enola Gay

    add elements

    i.e. when i was in The Army, we were constantly built up, broken down, and told we were the best soldiers in the world, etc...
    "we are better", "we have a mission", "for our Country", etc... you get the gist

    Physical distancing is probably the most effective, and most viable.
    i.e. firing a howitzer miles away from the target.
    or
    more recently "Nintendo Warfare"

    Social distancing, is more akin to using slander. I'll spare the typed out examples, but you get the gist of racial and national slander.
    i suppose i could use a more pertinent example.
    i.e. my 91 year old grandfather, in Ventura, Ca. says about people on bicycles, "the only people you see on bicycles are illegals who can't afford cars." (albeit my grandfather, WWII vet, pearl harbor, etc... he's a mean old man... stubborn... aka: bigot)

    here's a video:



    I think its probably safe to say, that the one thing that American's have in common, is The Automobile.
    there are so many other iconoclastic parts of each of our heritages, however... The Automobile permeates every household.
    Buddhist, Catholic, Jew, Anglo, Asian, Hispanic.... et al

    roadways, by ways, all this stuff is for The People

    people have rights
    not vehicles

    but, somewhere along the line we've put automobiles before ourselves.

    the guy washing his motorbike, while his kid shows off on their scooter, trying to get his attention. (gross example) <--- of which I have often seen. only to have the guy yell at his kid to get out of the street.

    my grandpa, seemingly loves his Cadillac more so than his own son. (but of course that cannot be true, its just that, post WWII consumer/industrial values have over shadowed his skill in demonstrating a "loving" relationship)

    in an car
    a person is encapsulated
    its The Great American Sanctuary
    its the place where people go to "get away" from things
    its the place where people close the doors, roll up the windows, blast the stereo, and "de-stress"
    its the place where people go to drive somewhere, and to view the world, thru glass, get out of the car at a vista point, and get back in the car.
    ad infinitum

    its so easy to provide those 3 forms of Distancing

    in respect to sharing the roadways
    the reality is that we all, use the roads. that is... we, as individuals, and individual citizens, as people, human beings quite possibly with kids, we all share our Public Roadways.
    however...
    the automobile, provides these 3 forms of Distancing, plus mass anonymity.

    often we'd witness an incident, and we'd describe it something like this: "that white SUV ran into the red sedan". that is because that is what we can describe, its what we perceived thru our eyes.
    the reality is, "Mr/Miss/Misses so and so, had a collision with Mr/Miss/Misses so and so."
    the auto provides that degree of guise and anonymity

    similarly how we'd witness cars zooming up the shoulder of a road, maybe a merge, to get ahead of other cars.
    similarly how we'd witness people in the grocery store cutting in line in front of other people to get to the register quicker.

    however, the later, is not as common, as we as people have that human interaction, face to face, eye to eye, and those elements of distancing are lessened.

    the prior example, is actually people cutting in line. its just that the automobile gives us that anonymity.
    its easier to be rude in our expensive (I must have a better job, therefore I'm higher up on the social scale, I'm in a hurry) car, cutting off some poor sap in their junky (they must be some poor junkie that obviously cannot afford a decent car, probably bcz they lack education, a decent job, they must be on welfare... with no job, they don't have anywhere to be, other than the welfare line), I'll simply use the 300hp and big Brembo disc brakes, to power by, and jam the brakes, to get in front, where I belong.
    (gross example)

    it goes back to those basic 3 forms of Distancing.

    and

    we've chosen to put automobiles before ourselves.
    ad nauseam

    here's another reference:

    i think this guy is a genius: Donald Shoup
    http://shoup.bol.ucla.edu/

    if you read around, you'll be blown away.


    thats my 2 bit dissertation

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  25. #25
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    I'd like to make an observation. Some time ago I was riding my motorcycle through town near the university campus. Traffic was slow but OK. I was approaching an intersection - cross traffic was required to stop. A girl on a bicycle coming from my left riding at a slow, steady pace paid no attention to the stop sign and continued on her leisurely way on a collision course with me. She looked directly at me with an indifferent look seeming to fully expect me to stop and allow her to pass. I...knowing she should be stopping...was already committed and had no choice but to grab throttle and get out of her way. The motorcycle was new to me and the front wheel came off the ground by probably 3 feet. Unsettling to say the least (and a little exhilarating).

    I was pissed and perplexed all at the same time. I thought about it though and came to the conclusion that the issue was probably cultural. The cyclist was Asian...most likely Chinese. In many parts of Asia, bicycles outnumber motorized vehicles by a huge margin and the "right of way" observed there is reversed from what it is here. She probably fully expected me to yield to her.

    Hopefully, she doesn't get killed by doing this. If I had been in a car...she would have piled right into the side of me.

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