Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    117

    Odometer Speedometer for my Commuter

    Its been 2 weeks now since Ive started commuting on my bike. Im putting in about 12mi a day and Im loving it.

    Ive already been able to see some good improvements. By adding Town & Country tires I was able to shave off about 9 minutes off my time.

    My next upgrade are brakes and a Odometer Speedometer.

    What do you guys have on your commuters? I really dont want to brake the bank on any of these either.

  2. #2
    MTB, Road, Commuting
    Reputation: bedwards1000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,998
    I go for the absolute cheapest thing I can find. They all pretty much tell you speed/average/time/max. A few of mine have cadence but that isn't particularly useful info. The Nashbar Tempo use to be a great choice for $12 but the don't seem to carry it any more. The Blackburn ones aren't bad but sometimes crap out. Here's one for 10 bucks.
    RETURNED: Blackburn Delphi 3.0 Bike Computer with Cadence - Normal Shipping Ground

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,092
    Stay away from the "X-Mart" brands like Bell. They do helmets well but cycling computers are beyond them.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    316
    I don't know if it's an option for you, but I just use RunKeeper on my smartphone. Saves bar space too.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    117
    Actually Im one of those weirdos that does not own a cellphone so that would not be an option hehehe

  6. #6
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,275
    ^^ When I'm feeling techy, I use Strava on the smartphone. It records everything and tells you way more than you want to know.
    I have more and more friends on there now, and the social aspect of it is fun too... It's great to know you just stole someone's "KOM", and that they're getting an email saying that you just beat them... then 3 days later you get the same email.... it makes you push for sure.

    I have never had a little cycling computer thingy work right. they always crap out or stop working, or reset altogether... I've never had a reliable one, so I just quit trying. When they did work, I liked being able to glance down and see my average speed, etc... but it was hardly worth it when the thing would start blinking "0" 5 minutes before the end of the ride when I was getting excited about seeing how I did.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,202
    You can also get into the Strava thing if you have any sort of standalone GPS bike computer.

    I use a Garmin Forerunner 310XT watch with a qr adapter so I can go from wrist to handlebars fluidly (it's a triathlon watch). The adapter is separate, but worth it IMO. I use it when I only want to record the ride and have basic computer stats. I have a Garmin Oregon 450 that I use when I want maps and more robust navigation capability. Mostly just for mountain biking, really.

    I bought the watch as a refurb for something like $160 or so. It's nice in that it can pair with a heart rate monitor, speed/cadence sensor, and even a power meter or a foot pod.

    Here is the ride I did today. It wasn't exactly a commute since I didn't work...and I don't work downtown. But anyway, here it is. Recorded with that Garmin Forerunner 310XT I mentioned. I actually have a Forerunner 210 I'm casually looking to sell. good GPS and training functions, but it does not work with extra sensors.


  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,175
    I mostly use a gps, but they have disadvantages too, like you have to charge them (well mine) all the time whereas the bikecomputers have along battery life. I was always partial to the wireless one, which are generally a little more money, but no pesky wires to route down to your fork. Some keep your data even when you change batteries, which is nice becasue it's always upsetting to be zeroed out mid-season. Auto off is nice in case you forget to power down. I'm not up to date on the offerings, but had good luck with Cateyes. I recently saw this Sigma bike computer tracks gas saved | Bicycle Retailer and Industry News which I thought was a cool idea, if a little gimmicky.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,011
    The Bell wireless from Wal-Mart or wherever works fine -- about $20. The only problem is that you have to remember to turn it on. If you stop for several minutes it turns itself off and you need to remember to turn it on again. It has a thermometer which is a neat feature.

    I also have a Cateye Strada Wireless that I found on Amazon or eBay for around $50. It is auto off AND on so you just ride and don't have to worry with it. The quality of construction and mounting parts is better than the Bell, but the Bell is adequate if you remember to turn it on.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    181
    I have been using the Planet Bike Protege 9.0 for about a year and haven't had any problems. It's not too expensive either. Programing it is fairly easy as well.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    572
    Cateye Strada Wireless as stated above. Dirt/road never a problem. Cateye sells a accessory package which includes a wheel sensor and an additional bar mount so you can use the computer on another bike. Worth the extra bucks to rid oneself of the wired unit

  12. #12
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,679
    Quote Originally Posted by FlakoGT View Post
    Actually Im one of those weirdos that does not own a cellphone so that would not be an option hehehe
    Hey, I`m a fellow cell-free weirdo! Gimme five!

    I`ve used a few (three?) cheap CatEye models that I`ve picked up in the $20 range on sale. All the computers have worked fine, all the directions have sucked. Tried one off-brand computer from a box store and found out that it couldn`t be calibrated to wheel size other than 20 inch, 24 inch, 26 inch, etc. Took that one right back to the store. My commuter now has a fancy German computer with altimeter and an extra trip odometer that I find useful. I like it, but I could live without those two features again pretty easily.

    I have generator hubs, which supposedly screw up wireless comupters, so I`ve never tried one of those. Personally, I`d rather tape a wire to my fork than deal with another battery anyway. Somebody mentioned mulitple mounts. That can be handy- I use the same computer (one of those $20 CatEyes) on my folder and on my recumbent, would get another mount for the fancy-schmancy computer on my commuter to use it on other 26ers too, if I could still find one available (it`s an old model). I know for sure that the CatEye "Mity" series and the PB "Protege" series offer extra mount kits. Well, at least they did when I was last shopping for computers.
    Recalculating....

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,175
    If you're wondering how often you'll need to mess with batteries, the cateye wireless units are rated at 1 year for the computer (using it 1 hr/day) and 6250 miles for the sensor battery.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    150
    I have had good experience with the entry level (wired) sigma computers. One has lasted me 2 years with only a battery replacement, and another is pushing one year (on my mountain bike, which is way more abuse). Way better quality than the bell that I tried, and not much more money; I see them on sale fairly regularly for less than $20.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    117
    Thanks a lot everyone,

    Im going to start googling the different option and see what I end up with. Seems there are lots of options and prices arent that bad.

  16. #16
    Ex-Clydesdale
    Reputation: Dwayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    600
    Quote Originally Posted by fotooutdoors View Post
    I have had good experience with the entry level (wired) sigma computers. One has lasted me 2 years with only a battery replacement, and another is pushing one year (on my mountain bike, which is way more abuse). Way better quality than the bell that I tried, and not much more money; I see them on sale fairly regularly for less than $20.
    I'm a Sigma fan, been using them for about 15 or 16 years now. Nashbar regularly has the cheaper ones for a good price, like $15. Batteries last a few years, wouldn't bother with wireless.
    '94 RSBikes Stampede (commuter), '05 Prophet, '09 Scattante XRL Team, '10 Slice 4
    Retired: 97 C-DaleSuper-V, 05 C-Dale R5000

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,570
    I'm partial to Sigma's computers, if only because they are way less of a pain to setup than Cateye. As far as reliability, they both have it in spades, though I've noticed that if you are paying retail, you'll get slightly more, feature wise, from a comparable Sigma. I like their backlight features quite a bit, as a year-round commuter, but battery life suffers a bit.

    Some of Sigma's nicer computers can be attached via a USB cradle to download information, but most of it is pretty basic stuff anyhow, and is probably just as well served with a notepad file (take note, you can back up your information with it, though!)

  18. #18
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,003
    nevermind
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  19. #19
    Human Test Subject
    Reputation: Volsung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    538
    Quote Originally Posted by SocratesDiedTrolling View Post
    I have been using the Planet Bike Protege 9.0 for about a year and haven't had any problems. It's not too expensive either. Programing it is fairly easy as well.
    +1. It's got a thermometer which is pretty awesome. I've heard of some LCDs crapping out below 0F but my planet bike works just fine In MN winters.

    I don't know why my phone wanted so badly to capitalize "in."

  20. #20
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,679
    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    I don't know why my phone wanted so badly to capitalize "in."


    On batteries: Mine have lasted two years, but after one went out just a few days before New Years (I total and zero everything on 01/01, so that sucked), I started replacing them each year when I rezero.
    Recalculating....

Similar Threads

  1. Dakota 20 Odometer
    By Phillbo in forum GPS, HRM and Bike Computer
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-25-2012, 07:22 PM
  2. Dakota 20 Odometer
    By Phillbo in forum Arizona
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-25-2012, 07:21 PM
  3. Odometer?
    By jkeith in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 09-14-2011, 06:22 AM
  4. Ebay Odometer Review
    By nikojan in forum GPS, HRM and Bike Computer
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-06-2011, 09:27 PM
  5. Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-17-2011, 04:32 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •