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  1. #1
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    Reputation: 08HardRock's Avatar
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    Newb Commuter Tire/Tube Help

    I'm commuting with my HardRock Sport. At first I figured I would be fine with the factory tires, but now I'm starting to feel like a tranquilized elephant as I ride down the trail. Its a paved bike path, with some bumps and uneven pavement here and there. My question is when I get new tires, right now I'm thinking somewhere in the 26 x 1.75-1.95 range, do I need to get new tubes as well or can I use the ones I have now? My tires now are 26 x 2.1. Can someone supply a link to a straightfoward, do-it-yourself, tire replacing video.
    TIA

  2. #2
    BIG and Bald
    Reputation: FireBallKY's Avatar
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    Current tubes will be fine. As for tires, I suggest the Specialized Crossroads or Hemispheres. I love Specialized stuff.

    I might also suggest after buying your new tires, ask the shop if they would put them on for you while you watch up close or even assist. My shop is cool about stuff like that as long as they're not slammed with other customers. Removing the rear wheel can be tricky the first few times. You'll also need to buy a set of tire levers. These make the process alot smoother.

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  3. #3
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    Everyone has a different favorite tire. Much of my riding is done on the same type of bike path you describe, but with a little unmaintained gravel and dirt road thrown in.

    I like Geax Roadsters. I went with the same size tube as I had (I had 2.25" knobbies and the Roadsters are 1.9 or something like that), but I ended up getting "downhill" tubes. They're heavier, but pinch flat resistance is worth it. YMMV.

  4. #4
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    My faborite commuter tire...

    is the Trek Invert Select in 2.0. They have sufficient tread to keep you upright should the weather man screw up and you get wet on your ride, and they do well on gravel paths too. They have sufficient volume to allow a bit lower pressures for the comfort factor. I weigh 230 geared and ride them at between 40 and 45psi. Nice easy rolling tire and enough cush to damp out allot of road chatter. Yet they still roll very smoothly and quite fast for their size. They also wear very well. My current set has 300 miles on them and the only thing different from the day I bought them is all those little injection tabs are worn off.

    Anyway, as was mentioned, everyone has their "favorite" tire. There are plenty of good medium to high volume pavement tires out there in 26" that will work well. I would only suggest staying away from slicks if you are an all weather commuter. Slicks in the rain can be hazardous.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the input everyone. I mostly am a fair weather commuter, but I think I'd stay away from slicks just so I'm not constantly worried about road hazards. Basically, I think I'm fine with a cheap tire b/c the path is pretty well maintained. I came across Kenda Komforts, which seem well recieved in the review section. My question is, would those tires cut down on resistence significantly enough that I would notice a considerable difference? They seem to have meat on them, but I'm not sure if it will be too much, to the point it would defeat the purpose. Thanks again!!!!

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