Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 49 of 49
  1. #26
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244
    Quote Originally Posted by Rabies010 View Post
    I remember that in another thread someone used grubscrews to stud a tire.
    He drilled a hole from the inside out screwed in the grubscrews until it completely disappeares in the rubber and i also think he glued in a really thin innertube as a tire liner.
    Interesting ! May be a very nice way to go if it's holding good in place. To eliminate those screw heads would be a big plus.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  2. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,344
    ^ I looked at setscrews last year, but as a canuck they're tough to get. In the states you can order in bulk from mcmaster carr, but in Canada you have to go in to a Fastenal or Acklands Grainger store. Homedepots just carry packs of 10. Which isn't to say that it's impossible...just that you can't do it online and I am lazy.

    I never found a followup on how well the setscrews actually worked, but they should wear at the same rate as the selftapping screws. I think they'd end up being a bit more expensive, but would be lighter with less risk to the tube.

  3. #28
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,530
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ I looked at setscrews last year, but as a canuck they're tough to get. In the states you can order in bulk from mcmaster carr, but in Canada you have to go in to a Fastenal or Acklands Grainger store. Homedepots just carry packs of 10. Which isn't to say that it's impossible...just that you can't do it online and I am lazy.

    I never found a followup on how well the setscrews actually worked, but they should wear at the same rate as the selftapping screws. I think they'd end up being a bit more expensive, but would be lighter with less risk to the tube.
    i've thought about set screws but the threads are so thin/small i always worried they'd just worm their way back into (or out of) the tire. at least the metal screws have coarse large threads

    i'd love to hear from someone who had good success with the set screws...
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  4. #29
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244
    Quote Originally Posted by ferday View Post
    i've thought about set screws but the threads are so thin/small i always worried they'd just worm their way back into (or out of) the tire. at least the metal screws have coarse large threads

    i'd love to hear from someone who had good success with the set screws...
    Heck, like I said I'm going south in only 3 weeks, so I'll take a look at those setscrews. And maybe try a few of them in the mix and see how it goes. I'll definitively have to glue them in though.

    Actually, my rona might have some metric ones, which are often alloy steel... Depending on the price (if they have some), I'd experiment around.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  5. #30
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,793
    Ive gone to the dark side (commercial studded tires), but made a few sets with the smallest size car tire studs available. When I first made a pair there was no internet and I had to walk 5 miles in the snow both ways to buy them from a tire store.

    Pros of my DIYs: Unsurpassed grip
    Wear like iron

    Cons of my DIYs: Rolling resistance/buzz on paved sections (they stick out more than bike tire studs)
    Heavy
    More prone to flats. This was the biggest downside. Eventually the flange of the stud (you drill tire & mount from inside) would wear through or shift whatever liners I used (Mr Tuffy, old tube, snakeskin-like liners, glue, etc.).

  6. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,640
    I've got a 2/3's done pair of Bonty Connections with carbide panhead screws. Pics forthcoming tomorrow when I finish them.

    If you can find an old pair of those tires, btw, I really like them for this purpose. They have nice, big knobs on the outsides of the center tread.

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,344
    Talking about DIY studding made me realize that there's still a hole in the commercial market - no one makes a chunky knobby that is only moderately studded.

    I've got Mount&Grounds which have 160 studs per tire, and are great on ice and in most winter conditions. In fresh snow though, they're twitchy and frustrating and pretty much suck. The number of studs is never the issue - it's the width (which is both too narrow and too wide) and the tread that are the problem.

    I've also got Ice Spiker Pros which are fantastic, and solid, and predictable, and I don't have to worry until the snow is as deep as my bottom bracket. But they've got 402 studs per 29er tire and have a msrp of $160 (although thankfully you can find them much cheaper). I don't need 402 studs - it's the width and the tread that makes them so dependable. Even on snowy singletrack the extra studs aren't doing much, and I'm not racing around on skating rinks. I'd love to have the option of an Ice Spiker-Lite or a Nokian less-Extreme with the same aggressive casing but half the studs.

    When people make a DIY tire they often go with a big knobby and two rows of studs. It's what I did, and it makes sense, but for some reason Schwalbe and Nokian don't offer that.
    Last edited by newfangled; 12-11-2012 at 01:01 PM.

  8. #33
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244
    True. Pretty much one of the reason I'm going DIY. I don't see anything in the market as of now that fit my likings (coz it's more of a want than a need), and if it does, it's little to no chance to be in my price range to be cost-competitive with my DIY stuff. Maybe a nice knobby in 2.4 with two rows of studs and around 100-150 studs only, with good hard snow/ice rubber compound for under $45, maybe $30 on sale would be ideal for my mtb. Since it's not gonna see a lot of pavement miles anyway, I wouldn't need super hard expensive studs, but just some value-oriented quality. If it can be better than the $17 CST Caballero 2.4 tire and about $5 worth of screws and 1 hour of DIYing, for under $45, well yes it fit my price-range. I simply like to do stuff my way.

    Even if my way is often way out of everyone else's
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    40

    nokian stud tool and replacement studs

    Lots of granite rocks here in SW NH which is not good for studs put in from outside- everytime I lose a stud from my Nokians, which is usually off one of the edge knobs, the hole either rips into the knob or enlarges and the replacement studs won't stay in. I'm studding up a pair of Nevegals using stainless steel cone point socket screws which go all the way in from the inside and leave no trace... & I can use Stan's solution so no tubes.

    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Flippin hell...for the price of those studs, you might as well buy a pair of Nokians and their stud replacing tool. And you'll still come out under half of what it would take to do two tires.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #35
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244
    Interesting. Let us know how it goes
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  11. #36
    squish, squish in da fish
    Reputation: fishwrinkle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,067
    i know this is old, but i'd really like to know how set screws work? by the looks of it jackson jr won't be responding as his last log on was a day after this post.

  12. #37
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)

    Well I have experimented since then and using class 12.9 steel alloy button head M3 or M4 screws with 2-3mm of exposed thread is the way to go. You can get 100 of them for $6 and they last quite a while, pretty much forever if you never hit pavement. Not too heavy either and rust only gets on the surface and get brushed off right away when you ride again. No need to get them zinc plated, black oil finish (aka plain) will be enough and the zinc plating will flake off anyway. Run the tires tubeless too, despite the fine 0.5mm pitch thread, the screws won't loosen up nor leak under flex. You can order from Boltdepot.com for a great price and selection, plus pick up stainless hardware while you're at it for your bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    86
    My local bike shop sells their own DIY studded tires but just do them on the edges. The use a small hex headed screw but have the screw head as the stud, so pointy bit on inside of tire. But for me to do 700+ studds btw 2 tires seems like a lot of work when I can have a proven product for $120 CDN a tire.

  14. #39
    squish, squish in da fish
    Reputation: fishwrinkle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,067
    thanks david, i did find the screw you were talking about in ss for $.06 each. man idk if i really want to do tubeless though, never have, seems like a PITA. plus my rims aren't meant to be run tubeless, i know guys run em but just doesn't seem right. i have the dually's. so you're saying that m3 or m4 is better than an m6? i was looking at these last night M6 x 8mm Cone Point Set / Grub Screws (DIN 914) - A4 Stainless Steel and they have a 1mm pitch instead of .5 which i thought would hold better, no? just tossing out ideas, but i will go your route if you think it's the better of the 2

  15. #40
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)

    Beware of the metal alloy you're choosing ! The reason why studded tires cost so much is due to a very hard but expensive carbide tungsten steel core with aluminum outer shell stud that last many seasons even on pavement. Our goal here is to be able to stud our own tires in the most durable way without spending a fortune. Stainless steel, while it has excellent rust-proof properties, remains a very soft steel alloy compared to carbide and will wear off in no time. It is also more expensive. Not a good candidate. The self-drilling sheet metal screws use a hardened tip, but still quite softer than carbide, although harder than SS. The metric steel alloy bolts are manufactured in 4 grades, known as "class" and range from soft to very hard; 8.8 - 10.9 - 12.9 - 14.9. It is similar to the imperial grades of 3 - 5 - 8, but offers a even stronger steel alloy in small sizes. The hardest steel alloy we can have in a small size (~3mm-4mm ) is class 12.9 for screws and class 14.9 for set screws. Given that set screws need a lot more rubber to hold them tight and not every tire has enough material, the metric socket button head class 12.9 screws are a great fit for studded tires. A M3 screws (3mm) is more than enough and will offer enough bite while keeping minimal rolling resistance and will allow for smaller knobs to be studded and keeping a low weight. The button head will offer good support and very low profile, easy for a layer of tire sealing to build up and seal over the head and not in the way if you need to run a tube with a tire liner. The socket heap works great for torquing them just right without slippage. They are inexpensive and lightweight but durable. I've done 3 tires with them last winter and they are almost good as new after a full season. Works a lot better than sheet metal screws or anything else I've tried in the last 3 years. 2-3mm is the ideal stud length, so check the length you need depending on the tire you'll be using.

    https://www.boltdepot.com/Metric_soc...m_x_0.5mm.aspx

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)-photo.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  16. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,344
    ^ thanks David, that's good info. My experience with the self-drilling ones was that they wore too fast, but if I do it again I'll have to try those bolts.

  17. #42
    squish, squish in da fish
    Reputation: fishwrinkle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,067
    thx

  18. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: solarplex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    163

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)

    I got my marathon winters, 26x2" for $50 a piece from crc


    #canadastrong

  19. #44
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)

    Marathon Winter are great for commuting, but for offside they are a real boat anchor at over 1kg per tire. The Ice Spiker Pro are lighter at less than 700g, but pretty darn expensive at $100 each. My tires for my XC bike that I studded last winter are CST Critters, 26x2.1 folding at 600g each. With about 100 studs each, they are 650g per tire and grand total was $45 for both tires and screws (M3 screws). They are great for offroad and I run them tubeless with homebrew sealant. Cheap, durable and performant.

    I have a Marathon Winter 26x1.75 in front of my commuter and it's great for the roads, but not enough thread depth for offroad if you hit soft or deep snow.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,332
    Think one DIY solution has been completly overlooked...

    It should be possible to coat a tire with a liquid plastic filled with sand particles....

    Only a thin layer would be required, as the liquid vinyl wears off more sand particles would be exposed to replace those that fall off...

    Should work well for ice...

    I would hand sipp the tire first to ensure good bonding sites...

    And no I will not be trying this, I have three sets of Nokian studded tires...

  21. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,344
    ^ some automotive winter tires have walnut shells embedded in the rubber:

    Winter Tire Technology | Blog | Toyo Tires Canada

    For bikes I assume that the discreet knobs and discreet studs are a better approach, but I've always thought a "scratchy" tire would be cool.

  22. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    79
    Hey, if anyone is looking for the GRIPSTUDS product in Canada, my company is a dealer for them...and I'm a fatbiker too! I have Husker-Du's with 75 studs per tire, and also Fatback Sterlings with 90 per tire. Works grreat, and I have 3 winters on the Huskers, with zero lost studs.

    www.bracebridgemachine.com

    Go to the contacts page and send me an email, or give me a call.

    100 pack is $104.95
    150 pack is $156.95
    1000 pack is $996.00
    Install tool is $9.95

    All Canadian Funds, all in stock in Ontario. No Duty, brokerage, or exchange to pay.

    Cheers, Roy.

  23. #48
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,244

    New DIY studded tire thread ! Post your ideas and experiments :)

    Hi Roy, I understand you're also a winter rider just like us and you happen to work in a store that sell winter biking related goods, thanks for letting us know about the Canadian availability of these studs.

    However, as a friendly advice, I would suggest you rephrase your post not to disclose any specific pricing (simply say around $1/stud, cheaper by quantity, please PM me for more details) and not show yourself as a middleman or seller for your shop on the forums, as it goes against MTBR policy to allow free advertising of commercial interest. However if your shop is interested into PR, they can sponsor a forum or simply pay for an ad and help keeping MTBR rolling strong. Several members can be offended by seeing these type of "free" advertising, even more those who already pay to advertise their local business or services/products on the forums. In last, I'd strongly suggest you contact one of the administrator of MTBR (Gregg or Francois), or perhaps one of the SuperModerator, to seek advices and guidelines on how to post about products of interests the company you happen to work for is selling.

    And I have to say, you should try the graded 12.9 steel alloy metric machine screws this season, and see how they compare to the GripStuds in term of weight, durability, grip, rolling resistance and handling, ease of installation and cost. You could be surprised !
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    79
    Thanks for the tips.

    I will look into a paid ad on MTBR.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •