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  1. #1
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    Need fat bike for cold wet winter?

    What fatbike companies are there out there?

    And how flat resistant can the tires be? Greenguard levels of protection?

    And if all you have is a cross check, are there other ways to beat the snow?

  2. #2
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    Delete this thread. Wrong forum.

  3. #3
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    Are you using it as a commutter
    Save a tree & wipe your butt with an owl.
    Thank your local Sierra Club.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Delete this thread. Wrong forum.
    I beg to differ
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I beg to differ
    I agree.

    The number of fatbikes around here really jumped up last winter. But there were still way too many times when I had to clear my own singletrack, while the fatbike tracks stuck to the nicely cleared MUPs. I think half of the fatbikes around here must be ridden by boring roadies.

    For commuting in the winter weather in my neck of the woods, if it's a choice between carbide studs or giant tires, I think I'd much rather have studs. Carbide studs and giant tires would be good too, but that's an extra-spendy combination.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    What fatbike companies are there out there?

    And how flat resistant can the tires be? Greenguard levels of protection?

    And if all you have is a cross check, are there other ways to beat the snow?
    Studs on the a cross bike will work fine....the narrow tires sink down through the snow to a harder level or the ground and the studs provide lots of traction....(even on hard pack snow)....

    Depending on the snow sometimes you want to float on top sometimes you want to dig in....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I agree.

    The number of fatbikes around here really jumped up last winter. But there were still way too many times when I had to clear my own singletrack, while the fatbike tracks stuck to the nicely cleared MUPs. I think half of the fatbikes around here must be ridden by boring roadies.

    For commuting in the winter weather in my neck of the woods, if it's a choice between carbide studs or giant tires, I think I'd much rather have studs. Carbide studs and giant tires would be good too, but that's an extra-spendy combination.
    I think some people who buy them miss the point of a fatbike. I saw one earlier this year on the road with Maxxis Hookworms inflated to disgustingly high pressures. I went to test ride a Krampus awhile back and the shop inflated the tires to 30psi. I deflated them significantly after I realized how firm they were.

    Where I live, a fatbike as a commuter is a bit much, even in winter. You might really need the extra flotation of the tires a few days. The big issue here, though, is ice. So I'd agree with the comments about having carbide studs for winter commuting. MUCH more useful where I live, too. But even then, around here you could commute much of the winter with regular tires if you were careful.

    I still want a fatbike, though, but it's got nothing to do with snow.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I think some people who buy them miss the point of a fatbike.
    Of the fatbikes I've seen, I do wonder how many of them have been told that only a fatbike will work in the winter, even if they're only planning on riding paved, cleared trails. But oh well, it gets them outside.

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I went to test ride a Krampus awhile back and the shop inflated the tires to 30psi.
    The shops around me always inflate to basically max PSI. When I got my first set of studs I asked the shop for advice on PSI - "I hear 30~35 is good?" - and they thought I was crazy.

    I'm sure it's a liability/cya thing - no shop wants a bunch of customers coming back with pinchflats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Of the fatbikes I've seen, I do wonder how many of them have been told that only a fatbike will work in the winter, even if they're only planning on riding paved, cleared trails. But oh well, it gets them outside.



    The shops around me always inflate to basically max PSI. When I got my first set of studs I asked the shop for advice on PSI - "I hear 30~35 is good?" - and they thought I was crazy.

    I'm sure it's a liability/cya thing - no shop wants a bunch of customers coming back with pinchflats.
    I work at a shop and the CYA thing with tire pressures has never been addressed. When I send someone on a test ride, I usually ask, unless they are new riders. Then I consider their size and choose a pressure for them. But ~30psi is common on most mtb's. 40ish for Townies, 60ish for hybrids, and about 110 for road bikes. But not fatbikes. I'd put them around 15-20 for a test ride, even though you can go lower. I mentioned to the guy what I've read about tire pressures people use on fatbikes, and he likewise thought I was nuts. Frankly, I think it has more to do with the fact that most of these guys ride road bikes around here and inflate tires like they do on their road bikes - as high as possible.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, last year I tried riding on snow and it ended up with me falling over and then walking.

    And that was with w240's.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Yeah, last year I tried riding on snow and it ended up with me falling over and then walking.

    And that was with w240's.
    Fat bike won't be any better. Especially on ice. Learning how to balance and stay upright while riding across snow and ice will be necessary no matter what size tires you are using.

    No studs, no fat, no problem
    Need fat bike for cold wet winter?-img_20130105_185452.jpg
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Yeah, last year I tried riding on snow and it ended up with me falling over and then walking.

    And that was with w240's.
    Studs don't really do anything for snow. They are for ice. And they don't mean you won't fall.

  13. #13
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    I have a 29er and a separate carbide studded wheelset, and I still want a fatbike. Can you guys change your tune a bit and help me justify purchasing one please. Thank you.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I have a 29er and a separate carbide studded wheelset, and I still want a fatbike. Can you guys change your tune a bit and help me justify purchasing one please. Thank you.
    Fat bikes are an excellent way to up your training to a higher level.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I have a 29er and a separate carbide studded wheelset...
    So I think I've figured out a cheap way to get gears working with my dirtdrop bars (which were a shortlived ss experiment last spring), and I think I'll probably try them on my 29er this winter.

    On snowy rides do you ever find yourself wishing for wider bars? I liked the feel of the bars for the short time that I rode with them, but even at the best of times winter handling can be so twitchy and weird. So I'm not sure what to expect.

  16. #16
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    Need fat bike for cold wet winter?

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I have a 29er and a separate carbide studded wheelset, and I still want a fatbike. Can you guys change your tune a bit and help me justify purchasing one please. Thank you.
    There is an entire Fat Bike sub forum full of fanbois that have no problem tirelessly reiterating the virtues of fat biking. Check it out!
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Studs don't really do anything for snow. They are for ice. And they don't mean you won't fall.

    The problem was that I sunk into the snow, probably about a foot deep, and could no longer turn the wheel.

  18. #18
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    Need fat bike for cold wet winter?

    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    The problem was that I sunk into the snow, probably about a foot deep, and could no longer turn the wheel.
    Fatbikes aren't immune to this in all types of snow. They are better than skinny tire brethren with that regard but not perfect

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Fatbikes aren't immune to this in all types of snow. They are better than skinny tire brethren with that regard but not perfect
    Agreed. Soft, powdery snow is the worst. It simply refuses to pack down and just moves around underneath you. Wet snow packs down nicely under fat tires, which can then be easily followed by narrower tires. In Iowa we are frequently on the border of warm/cold air masses so we get more wet snow than powder.
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    The problem was that I sunk into the snow, probably about a foot deep, and could no longer turn the wheel.
    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I have a 29er and a separate carbide studded wheelset, and I still want a fatbike. Can you guys change your tune a bit and help me justify purchasing one please. Thank you.
    If you get a foot of snow and it is not packed down at all by snowmachines, snowshoers, etc., then a fatbike will not help. So CB, you have to buy the fatbike plus some marquettes (fatskis) or snowshoes to pre-groom your fatbike trail.

    Skinny tires are too squirrelly for me in snow, a mtb tire or better gives me more confidence, especially since a fail in a car's path could be deadly. Fatbike is far superior for a trailride or partial trail-commute, but the killer studded MTB tires are better for most road commuting here. depending on how fast it's coming down, we generally have plows come through maybe every 4" or so during the commute hours that make it do-able.

  21. #21
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    What are these ski things?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    On snowy rides do you ever find yourself wishing for wider bars?
    On hardpack or icy roads, no. I'm very used to the drops on the commuter bike anyway, but no I do not find myself hurting for control. The exception would be when it's deep and loose... I can see wanting a flat/riser bar in that situation.

    funny, I've been thinking about going to a standard bar on the Ogre, just for a change. No issues with the drops, but I've never 're-imagined' that bike, and it might be time...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  23. #23
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    I had a single ride on compressed snow/ice with car snot on top. I bought studded tires that night. Ice and poorly plowed and compressed snow is the norm here if the roads aren't clear. Studded tires on a normal bike will work unless we get a 30" blizzard.

    I have a fatbike in mind instead of an FS bike. There are some fields I could just cut across, and when we get snow (almost always some degree of wet snow, powder is rare and a thin layer at most, (best over ice). it would be a blast as long as the idiots have already gone into the ditch. Be fun to see the neighbors as I roll a fatty by. Two counties away some decent trials in the eroded rolling Brown County to try with one. Not N+1 time yet, though.

  24. #24
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    I've seen a few folks rolling with fat bikes at Brown County this summer. Another couple up in Indy. I've seen more in the summer than I did over the winter.

    I am really not even considering winter riding much in my desire to have/ride a fatbike. Most of the time I do just fine riding my regular mtb all winter long, unless there's more than about 6" of new snow. I'd like to have a fatty for bikepacking. Too bad I don't have $10,000 for mikesee's Snoots. It'd probably fit me.

  25. #25
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    I'm in Minneapolis and commuted last few winters on both my disc cx and Moonlander. Last winter I had 45Nrth Xerxes (30c) on my cx bike. I'd ride either one depending on my mood and the weather. Before that I had a 26" mtb with Nokian Gazza Extremes.

    I don't have studded fat tires yet so I alternated between BFLs and Bud/Lou. BFLs for packed snow, Bud/Lou for fresh...but even they have their limits.

    Also, fat bikes aren't as bad as you think for ice. The big soft footprint is *ok* for occasional slick spots. I only went down twice from it, once from black ice on a sidewalk (got a little too rad) and once from the horrible job the city did of plowing so I was basically riding on a 3 inch thick ice sheet.

    The Gazza Extremes were better at ice sheets, but sucked on snow and the brown sugar soft spots on streets. Xerxes are bad at the snow mounds from plows going different directions on streets. That stuff freezes hard.

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