Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Need backpak

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14

    Need backpak

    This is a crosspost as I was advised to try over here. I'm looking for recommendations for a backpack to wear on a 9 mile one way commute. I live in Arizona so breathability is a must. Also need to be able to pack lunch and clothes for work daily as well as be able to use for light hiking with the wife. Would like to have some sort of water system as I will not be able to carry my camelback also. Any recs would be helpful.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,527
    Just get a big camelbak, like a mule or hawg, with capacity for all your stuff and 100oz of water.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marcster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    137
    I would recommend adding a bag or case to your bike.

    Two reasons:


    (1) You already have a Camelbak, why buy another water system?

    (2) Who wants to carry heavy weight on their back in the Arizona sun?

    -------------

    Why not go with a large handlebar bag or luggage?

    455 cubic inch Avenir bag:
    http://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Excursi.../dp/B00165Q4QW
    (I just ordered this myself)

    CrossRack bar & bag:
    http://www.xootr.com/crossrack-bike-rack.html
    (Apparently the size of a brown paper grocery store bag)

    ...And your options go up from there if you want to get into a seat post mounted bar or a rear rack, with a bag and/or panniers.

    -------------

    If you do decide to go with a Mule or similar Camelbak, look on eBay for used ones (which are typically sold w/o their bladder, since they're used) -and- just move your water system over to the new-to-you bag.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by jndlpr
    This is a crosspost as I was advised to try over here. I'm looking for recommendations for a backpack to wear on a 9 mile one way commute. I live in Arizona so breathability is a must. Also need to be able to pack lunch and clothes for work daily as well as be able to use for light hiking with the wife. Would like to have some sort of water system as I will not be able to carry my camelback also. Any recs would be helpful.
    I commute a 16.5 mile one way with the Camelbak cloud walker which has a fairly large storage area, but like some of the others said, the Mule also has a lot of storage, and has a few more handy small pockets too.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,175
    The Osprey Manta has a separate compressing section for the water bladder, is way cooler on your back than any camelbak, lifetime guarantee, magnetic hose end, helmet carrier, blinky attacher, zip pouches on belt for phone/camera/snacks. I use it for hiking too, super comfy.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    The Osprey Manta has a separate compressing section for the water bladder, is way cooler on your back than any camelbak, lifetime guarantee, magnetic hose end, helmet carrier, blinky attacher, zip pouches on belt for phone/camera/snacks. I use it for hiking too, super comfy.
    If you want to pay double the price for that extra hype, I guess that might work for you. Camelbaks are more practical and cost effective overall and available at a lot more places. Its pretty bad when you have to google the Manta just to find out what it is, I had never heard of it before.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    375
    JensonUSA has a Camelbak Alpine Explorer for around $50. The bag has cargo capacity of around 2000cu in which is way more stuff than I care to carry to work. Aside from my helmet, it's perfectly sized for an overnight snowboard trip as long as my jacket is strapped down on the outside of the pack. (I rent the snowboard and gear.)

    I once bought a Camelbak Motherlode but it did not fit well because I think it was made with body armor in mind. The bag was made from 1000 denier nylon so it looked and felt quite tough, but at around 4lbs empty it's quite heavy also.

    It doesn't keep my back dry though. Even with a 3mi commute, I still need to change shirts at work.

  8. #8
    nocturnal oblivion
    Reputation: stumblemumble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,307
    Osprey's are awesome packs. I have a two. I like them much more than my Camelback, they are more functional and well thought out.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by jseko
    JensonUSA has a Camelbak Alpine Explorer for around $50. The bag has cargo capacity of around 2000cu in which is way more stuff than I care to carry to work. Aside from my helmet, it's perfectly sized for an overnight snowboard trip as long as my jacket is strapped down on the outside of the pack. (I rent the snowboard and gear.)

    I once bought a Camelbak Motherlode but it did not fit well because I think it was made with body armor in mind. The bag was made from 1000 denier nylon so it looked and felt quite tough, but at around 4lbs empty it's quite heavy also.

    It doesn't keep my back dry though. Even with a 3mi commute, I still need to change shirts at work.
    I guess I'm spoiled, I have a gym about 100 yds from my office, and when I get in to work I show my face and then head next door to take a shower and change into uniform so it doesn't really matter for me.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marcster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by CornbredNE
    If you want to pay double the price for that extra hype, I guess that might work for you. Camelbaks are more practical and cost effective overall and available at a lot more places. Its pretty bad when you have to google the Manta just to find out what it is, I had never heard of it before.
    Osprey bags are on par with or less than Camelbak's pricing:

    Camelbak MULE (100 oz water & 854 cu. in. overall capacity) - $103.50 shipped
    http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-M-U-L.../dp/B00437WXCE

    Osprey Raptor 14 (3L (101.4 oz.) & 850 cu. in. overall capacity) - $87.16 shipped
    http://www.amazon.com/Osprey-Raptor-...dp/B002N4W5FO/

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    202
    Deuter and Vaude both make small backpacks that have air spaces to make them less inclined to heat you up.

    http://www.vaude.com/epages/Vaude-de...ucts/100897190

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tartosuc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by Maximus_XXIV
    Deuter and Vaude both make small backpacks that have air spaces to make them less inclined to heat you up.

    http://www.vaude.com/epages/Vaude-de...ucts/100897190

    I agree with that.
    I use a deuter futura 28AC for commuting (28L, the 22ac is 22L) just the right size for all you clothes and luch with tons of pockets. the mesh system works good. that said is till use a smaller dakine nomad for MTB(18L) but the deuter is just so versatile and the air space works good.
    Last edited by tartosuc; 04-19-2011 at 05:54 AM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Boise Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    72
    Well, personally I'll never buy another Camelback. Their warranty sucks. I have a Rim Runner that started falling apart after three years of light use (zipper pulling apart and the top handle ripped). Too bad because they only come with a two year warranty so I'm SOL.
    I will only buy packs from companies that actually have good warranties like Osprey, The North Face, etc.
    I have two TNF packs (which I love) that have full lifetime warranties. After three years of hard use, they're still holding up fine. Comparably priced to Camelback, also.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    375
    I've never used TNF packs, but after using some of their clothes, I'm starting to realize that it's not very good. The HyVent material doesn't vent compared to say Marmot Membrain or even Precip. Water resistance is great...but there's more to shells than just water resistance.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,009
    Quote Originally Posted by CornbredNE
    If you want to pay double the price for that extra hype, I guess that might work for you. Camelbaks are more practical and cost effective overall and available at a lot more places. Its pretty bad when you have to google the Manta just to find out what it is, I had never heard of it before.
    So let me get this straight, you're so unfamiliar with Osprey packs that you had to google them to see what they are, yet you're making the statement that Camelbaks are more practical and cost effective? I own an Osprey pack for backpacking (Atmos 65), have owned a Camelbak MULE for biking which my wife still uses, I currently use a Deuter hydration pack and my buddy I ride with weekly uses an Osprey hydration path. From all of this experience I can say that I like the Osprey and Deuter packs MUCH better than the Camelbaks. They are made better and have more useful storage. I especially like the Osprey and will replace my Deuter with one when the time comes. The prices are comparable between all three brands, so don't go making statements about cost effectiveness without data to back it up.
    For Sale:
    -Pearl Izumi Barrier rain pants, new, mens medium: $75 shipped
    -Shimano triple crankset/isis BB $50 - PM me

  16. #16
    Swedetarded
    Reputation: mrbigisbudgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    521
    I commute ~20 miles round trip with a Vaude Splash. On "full" days (monday and friday) it holds my clothes, a towel, deodorant, 2 phones, multi tool, pump, spare tube, tire levers, lock. I love it, it's comfortable, breathes, expandable, and I can put my camelback bladder in it if I want. I would recommend it to anybody needing a backpack for commuting.

    I was just commenting to my wife this weekend (we were on a 50K road ride) that the Vaude is so much more comfortable than my Camelback. She looked at me like I was retarded, since it so much bigger than my Camelback.

  17. #17
    Five is right out
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,168
    Ergon packs have extremely good ventilation as most of the pack is suspended away from your back, and their harness system makes for great hiking packs.

    BA3 or BC3 are the larger sized ones. The BA3 is a bit too big if you're looking for a mountain biking trail pack.

    Though personally, if I was commuting on a frequent basis, I'd just use a single Ortleib panner. You get all the weight off your back, it's completely ventilated, and you can snap it off your bike and carry it around like case. And then I'd get another pack for hiking. The downside is that you need a rack attached to your bike.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: motard5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    247
    Ergon backs are way overpriced, complicated, and are very cycling focused. I disliked the BD-2 very much. My .02

    I agree that if you are commuting in AZ more than 2 x per week, you should 100% get a pannier or some sort of bike mounted luggage. Plus if you think about it, you really do not need more than a water bottle for a 9 mile commute to work. I know your trying to kill two birds with one stone, but I would stick to separate systems here unless you have a shower at work, as then wearing a backpack will not be a big deal.

    For an all around pack suggestion, Osprey has many good choices, and they have the Metron series for commuting which are super slick. I suggest going to a store and try them on to see what you like - there are lots of choices.

    For an all around cycling/hiking back, I am currently rocking the Arc'Teryx Aerios 10. I love the Aerios series. Check out this vid of their Aerios 14...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEP4ObeXasQ

    desc:
    http://www.arcteryx.com/Product.aspx...acks/Aerios-14

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    375
    Quote Originally Posted by CornbredNE
    I guess I'm spoiled, I have a gym about 100 yds from my office, and when I get in to work I show my face and then head next door to take a shower and change into uniform so it doesn't really matter for me.
    I use my bag to stash my work shirt (just a random collared shirt), lunch, laptop, flat kit and tools, along with light softshell. I don't have space to stash clothes, otherwise I'd probably bring some on Monday and leave them there. I wouldn't ride in boots either.

    The only shower at work is the emergency shower in the middle of the restroom.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    15

    CamelBak H.A.W.G NV

    My commute is also around 9 miles and I am currently using the CamelBak H.A.W.G. NV. I take the hydration pak out because I need the room for my clothes as I don't have a locker or any place to store them. It also gives me plenty of room for my lunch and other items that I don't care to store at work. Seems to have held up pretty well over the last 3 years and has been very versatile for me. Just my .02

  21. #21
    aka DummyDiva
    Reputation: cowboygrrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    287
    Wingnut Gear. Different sizes to choose from. Suspension system puts the weight on your lower back. Will take the bladder of your choice. What endurance riders use.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Marcster
    Osprey bags are on par with or less than Camelbak's pricing:

    Camelbak MULE (100 oz water & 854 cu. in. overall capacity) - $103.50 shipped
    http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-M-U-L.../dp/B00437WXCE

    Osprey Raptor 14 (3L (101.4 oz.) & 850 cu. in. overall capacity) - $87.16 shipped
    http://www.amazon.com/Osprey-Raptor-...dp/B002N4W5FO/
    I will second Osprey beset money ever spend and you can usue it for other things than just biking as well. I love my Osprey bags, they are well though out and supper comfy.

    My comute is about 8 miles as well

  23. #23
    Wanderer
    Reputation: Toff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    829
    I have a Mule and a Raptor 14.

    I like the Mule more as its a bit simpler (I even cut off all straps except for the shoulder ones) and it just feels better on my back.

    The Raptor is very neat and has all kinds of neat pouches and stuff but just doeesn't feel as good on as my old Mule. To many straps everywhere.

    For commuting and carrying clothes/shoes, neither will be large enough.

    I actually use a BoB Trailer and just tow 5 days worth of stuff in on Monday.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    68
    I commute 12.5 miles each way with a camel bak hawg nv
    it has just enough room for work pants shirt under shirt sox boxers lunch a tube pump misc tools 3L of water and a book to read when work is slow .
    if you buy it through rei they will exchange or return it at any time for any reason even ten years later because you don't like the color.
    it works great for me unless I want to bring my laptop to work that day.
    thats my opinion.
    there might be better stuff for your needs but this works for me

    it doesn't have enough room for shoes unless you use the overflow pouch but I just keep a pair at work

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    70
    I got a camelbak Alpine explorer from Jenson for $40 and couldn't be happier.

    It has some deep air channels on the back but I have more of a problem with sweating under the shoulder straps

    It has the 100oz bladder which is way more than needed for most of my commuting.
    I carry my rain gear, tools and some spare parts with plenty of room for a reasonable lunch and some spare clothes. (probably do not need rain gear AND extra clothes... one or the other)
    You could probably buy a 50oz bladder to lighten it up a bit for commuting and have the options to toss the 100oz back in when needed.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •