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  1. #1
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    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update

    Well, I have been riding the Nashbar X frame as a commuter now for four years, year round. It has performed very well as a commuter. I have logged about 11,000 miles through year round riding in Portland Oregon, rain (lots of it), wind, snow, ice and sun. I have gone through three sets of chainrings, chains, cassettes and tires.

    I have ridden this bike to/from work, on errands around town, on double track trails and even on a 50-mile, 7,500 foot elevation gain ride! Fully dressed and ready to commute she weights in at 28 pounds.

    The big surprise of the components are the Novatec hubs. I ordered a set off ebay and they have been fantastic. 11,000 miles wit zero issues and no maintenance.

    Things I love about this frame:

    1. Disc brake compatible
    2. Great geometry
    3. Tall headtube - reduces the number of spacers needed
    4. Color and lack of decals

    Things that I am not in love with:

    1. 130mm rear spacing
    2. Super rigid ride - reminds me of my 80's vintage aluminum Cannondale road bike, the one with the HUGE frame tubes
    3. Could use more places to attach racks/fenders.

    Overall...I say this is an exceptional deal for the $99 I paid for it!


    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00872a.jpg
    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00874a.jpg
    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00876a.jpg
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  2. #2
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    This is some great news. I've been looking at nashbar's frames and they seem to be great value and now I know they are very durable. Thanks for the post.

  3. #3
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    They are a durable product. In some respects, they seem to be a bit over built. It's hard to beat the price of their frames.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  4. #4
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    I've got the same frame. CAn you take some closer pictures that show how you mounted the fenders and rack?

  5. #5
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    tbassak,

    Here you go!

    Front fender was attached to the fork. I had to bend the arm around the caliper to get it to fit.

    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00879a.jpg

    On the brake side on the rear, I attached one of the struts to the caliper mount using a stud instead of a bolt. I used an Axiom Disc rack that attaches to the axle to get around the caliper.

    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00880a.jpg

    And the rack struts to the standard mounting points on the seat stays.

    Nashbar X - Four Year Commuting Update-dsc00881a.jpg
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  6. #6
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    If you dont mind me asking.. What was the approximate cost of that build when you put it all together?

  7. #7
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    Oh man, this might just settle it. My X Frame is hanging in the shop, about 2/3 complete... Might be time to dust it off. it served me well in two incarnations as a geared commuter and then in a second life as a singlespeed. I have the Nashbar carbon fork also. Great combo. I did my first century on it. I ran fat tires and never had much of an issue with the rigid feel. I'm not that picky though.

    Mine is a little older, and has 135mm rear spacing, so it's easy to just use prebuilt 29er wheels and beef it up a bit.

    Nothing better than an aluminum bike in the rain/snow...pretty bulletproof material.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Oh man, this might just settle it. My X Frame is hanging in the shop, about 2/3 complete... Might be time to dust it off. it served me well in two incarnations as a geared commuter and then in a second life as a singlespeed. I have the Nashbar carbon fork also. Great combo. I did my first century on it. I ran fat tires and never had much of an issue with the rigid feel. I'm not that picky though.

    Mine is a little older, and has 135mm rear spacing, so it's easy to just use prebuilt 29er wheels and beef it up a bit.

    Nothing better than an aluminum bike in the rain/snow...pretty bulletproof material.
    Unless you have a 70's 10 speed with a steel frame as your commuter like I just so happen to :thumbsup ..... 40 years old an still running strong. Down side is it weighs 40 lbs which sucks to commute. Which was why I was looking to build one of these

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfb12 View Post
    If you dont mind me asking.. What was the approximate cost of that build when you put it all together?
    I don't mind at all... about $1,200 or so. I went with BB7 road brakes and a Winwood Carbon fork. Could have saved some money my using a Nashbar fork and BB5 brakes. I also built my own wheels using Sun Equilizer MTB rims, double butted spokes and alloy nipples. This all adds money to the build.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Nothing better than an aluminum bike in the rain/snow...pretty bulletproof material.
    Tru dat! I have turned this bike up on the rear tire after long rainy rides and the water rolls out of the frame. I don't have to worry about rust, but I miss the feel of steel.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  11. #11
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    BB5 brakes are more expensive in the long run, because of all of the things you break in the garage from throwing things and punching stuff when you're trying to get them adjusted correctly. Better to just start with BB7's
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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