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  1. #1
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    My first road bike, what should I get?

    My wife told me I could buy a road bike for Christmas. I'm 225lbs 6'2". I plan to ride in group rides locally and use this for 60 to 100 mile paved rail to trail rides.

    So I guess I'd like something moderately light, durable, comfortable, and with a decent parts selection.

    I prefer a steel frame, but not sure of the differences between 4130, 853, or OX Platinum. I would say titanium but I doubt there is anything I can afford for that price range.

    My price range is around $1000.

  2. #2
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    Good luck. Go ask on the RBR forums. I can't think of a single steel road bike that isn't custom besides the Surly Pacer. They're all aluminum and carbon

    4130 is the base type of steel used. 853 is a Reynolds tube set. It's a nicer steel with nice butts. OX Platinum is also a very nice steel. The last two are higher quality, harder steels, thus allowing them be thinner and lighter than 4130.

  3. #3
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    I could give you a list of my personal favorites, but for better results I suggest you register on rbr (roadbikereview.com). A lot of foks on mtbr, especially in the commuter forum, ride road bikes but that`s the main point on rbr rather than an "also" thing. Good folks over there and you just might find that you enjoy the different flavor going on over there- I like it.

    Okay, can`t miss a chance to plug the one that`s captured my own immagination- maybe you`ll buy one and give us a nice review and some pics: Bianchi Brava. You can also check the manufacturers websites to get an idea what turns your crank and ask (on rbr, preferably) about specific models. Besides the Bianchi Volpe and Brava, I know for certain that Surly, Novara and Jamis all have steel framed road bikes in the 1000-1200 range, probably most other makes have something too.

  4. #4
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Good luck. Go ask on the RBR forums. I can't think of a single steel road bike that isn't custom besides the Surly Pacer. They're all aluminum and carbon
    You`d think that by listening to people talk about what`s currently popular, but it isn`t true- moderately priced steel framesets and whole bikes are still out there, they just aren`t headline news. Just like you can still buy a quality hardtail mtb but you don`t hear a whole lot about them on mtbr. Do some investigation, brain. You`ll find one that points your compass north.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by brain3278
    My wife told me I could buy a road bike for Christmas. I'm 225lbs 6'2". I plan to ride in group rides locally and use this for 60 to 100 mile paved rail to trail rides.

    So I guess I'd like something moderately light, durable, comfortable, and with a decent parts selection.

    I prefer a steel frame, but not sure of the differences between 4130, 853, or OX Platinum. I would say titanium but I doubt there is anything I can afford for that price range.

    My price range is around $1000.
    I guess if you are dead set on a road bike, the the other guys that suggested checking out rbr are right on. But I will give you a little different outlook here. I don't race, I mostly commute (on my cross bike) and do group rides on gravel, rail to trails that are paved, and rail to trails that are limestone hardpack, and single track group rides with my MTB. I only mention all this because you talk about riding paved trails, and most of the road bikers I know don't ride the paved trails because they can become very unsafe due to walkers and joggers with head phones on and their four legged friends. So, I guess I am making an assumption here that you are wanting an all around good bike that just happens to be a road bike. If I am wrong, please disregard this message. If I am right, well then I would suggest looking at stuff from Surly, Salsa, and Bianchi for steel bikes. The Casseroll comes as a complete bike this year, but it is probably out of your price range at 1500.00. Surly makes both the Long Haul Trucker (LHT) and the Cross Check which can be had under 1K. All three of the bikes I mention are more utilitarian then an entry level road racer, but they will fit your wants of a bike that is steel. And they can act as multiple different bikes at different times. The Casseroll in particular looks to have all the makings of a road bike with brake lever shifters (STI) and assorted Ultegra bits, but it still can act as a commuter and lazy day family bike too.

    I hope my message helps out.

  6. #6
    56-year-old teenager
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    +1 on the Surly Long Haul Trucker. It's designed as a loaded tourer, which will help with the long miles. It's not light but it is durable.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  7. #7
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    + 2 on the surly, awesome bike and it fits the description of your needs exactly. if you are going to be riding rail trails iwth it, it will easily fit some CX tires

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/surly/longhaul.htm

  8. #8
    BIKE!!
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    Check out the Jamis line of bikes! They have some nice steel stuff and decent prices!

    www.jamisbikes.com

    Look at the Aurora or the Satellite
    Last edited by WolfmansBrother8; 11-19-2008 at 12:12 PM.

  9. #9
    !sdrawkcab kcusuoy aH
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    I rock a celeste Bianchi Brava for my 32 mile round trip commute. Its nothing fancy, has low grade parts on it. It gets the job done and I enjoy it. I would recommend it. I also like the Surly cross check/LHT, Jamis satelite is a nice ride as well. But, get what you want and dont be afraid to spend a little extra on it if you feel the need.

  10. #10
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    +3 on the surly. I went with the cross check though. Comes with CX tires and can handle lightly loaded touring with no problem. Might want to add a granny ring if you ride a lot of long distances fully loaded, but the crankset and shifters are all ready for the 3rd ring.

    Can't say enough good things about this bike.

  11. #11
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    I like the Bianchi and Jamis Selections. That looks like something I might be interested in.

    I'm sure the LHT is a great bike, it just seems so heavy.

  12. #12
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    Soma

    has a nice priced steel ride as well. I like them much more than the Surly

    buy a cross bike, best commuters and the swiss army knife of bikes

    have some MTB trails you are tired of? ride them on a cxer

    so look at the Soma or the Voodoo steel cx rigs in that range

  13. #13
    Wrench-O-Phile
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    Steel frame and fork, canti bosses, stout rear rack, nice retro paint... and at your price point as well:

    Novara Randonee

    http://www.rei.com/product/776887
    Just keep pedaling...

    visit the sticki chronicles

  14. #14
    weirdo
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    Retro paint? Actually, it`s kind of funny that you should mention the paint job in a positive way- that bike gets a lot of good press on the touring section over at bikeforums.net, but the new paint job for `09 has been the butt of a lot of jokes.

  15. #15
    jrm
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    Most important thing is

    Get your self fitted/sized. frame geometries change from maker to maker and knowing what size youll need will help you chose between offerings. If your set on a steel frame, id suggest not going the 4130 route and maybe buying a 853, tange or OX tubed frame used and then building it up. Also this way it can personalized. Just my opinion..

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