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  1. #1
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    Smile My dream commuter: Ti singlespeed with all the trimmings

    I just picked up a slightly used size large Voodoo D-Jab ti frame. It uses beautifully engineered sliding rear dropouts. The dropouts themselves are ti just like the frame. Water cut and with machined ridges to slide in grooves in the frame itself. Burly. Overall a super frame.

    I built it up with mostly used parts. King SS wheels (still dirty from use), Magura Marta calipers with Louise levers, Thomson, Sunline, Syncros, etc. I commute every day, all year in coastal Alaska and having fenders and lights are an absolute must. Studded tires and pogies in the winter too. I have ridden townie single speeds here for almost 20 years, but this is the first time I have gone Ti. Nice.























    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  2. #2
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    Are the bars a super secreat prototype?
    That is a sweet bike.

  3. #3
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    Are the bars a super secret prototype?
    That is a sweet bike.

  4. #4
    ride like you stole it
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    Are the hand warmers really worth it over gloves? I've seen them around my town but it just looks to me like they would kinda be difficult to deal with.

    Just wondering if I should pick some up for my commuter.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  5. #5
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    Careful, youll scratch your floors riding that in the house. That's a sweet commuter for sure - very nice! What's the weight?

    Love the slider dropouts, very slick.

    Final question - which fenders are those? I like the fact that they seem to be semi-clip-ons.

  6. #6
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    The fenders are Planet Bike Freddy fenders for ATB (60mm width). They would be reasonably easy to remove, but note that where they attach to the chainstay and seatstay crossbars I made a custom clamp. It is a stainless steel strap wrapped around the bar with a rubber cushion, and then to allow the fender to sit closer to the tire I spaced it inward with a short section of plastic tubing as a spacer that the bolt mounting bolt passes through. It is not meant to be quick to remove.

    Pogies are great and I ride with them for most of the year. Mine are not thickly insulated like the guys in the interior use. They have a synthetic fill insulation quilted to a silky taffeta lining so it is easy to slide my hands in and out, and snow does not stick to the lining if some gets in. The shell is waterproof which is nice because half their use comes in rainy weather. I don't need to wear gloves at any time all year thanks to the pogies. For riding offroad I wear gloves, but never around town. I sew my own so I have them just the way I want them. I have not been impressed with most of the off-the-rack models I have seen.

    I built a shop a few years ago, and we just wheel the bikes in and let them drip on the linoleum. It is very liberating.

    In the mean time I scraped the frame decals off and lightly brushed the frame with a Scotchbrite pad. Puuuurdy.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  7. #7
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I weighed it. As pictured with fenders and a pair of ~1,000 gram studded tires, but no pogies or lights, it came in at 25 pounds.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

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