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  1. #1
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    New question here. MTBer looking for first road bike: Motobecane Mirage Pro

    So I’ve been mountain biking for several years, everything from 8 hour XC epics to Fontana DH races. I’d like to think I’m a pretty experienced cyclist. Recently I got the idea to start road biking, mostly to commute (so that I can fit extra biking into a work day), but also for the sake of road cycling as a sport. I just like being on two wheels!

    I am looking to get my first road bike. I’ve already put thousands into my mountain bike, so I want something very entry level for the road, preferably $600 or less. I figure if I ever start to road ride competitively I can buy a snazzy carbon rig, but for now I just need a bike.

    I found the Mirage Pro at bikesdirect.com:
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...e_pro_sale.htm

    The bike looks great for only $500. It’s an aluminum frame with a carbon fork. It has Tiagra RD and Sora shifters. The FD is some type of low end shimano. I’m not crazy about the wheels, which are Alex brand. Otherwise everything looks fine.

    I’m not concerned about fit, at 6’5” I’m going for the 64cm version and I can always swap out the bars/stem/post if I run into fit issues. I’m can assemble it as well, so the buying online as opposed to LBS isn’t a big deal for me.

    Is this bike a good deal for me? Are there any similarly priced alternatives from more reputable brands? Besides their over-inflated claimed prices, are there any problems with BikesDirect?

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
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    You can't really go wrong with that bike, it should be more than sufficient for recreational road riding. I have a Motobecane Fantom 29 hardtail that I'm very happy with. If anything gets damaged in transit (it does happen), just contact them. They're pretty good about that sort of thing. The only thing I will add is that, as you're probably aware road tires can be very narrow (23mm). Being a mountain biker, you might prefer one of Motobecane's CX bikes that you can run wider tires on. Just a thought.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    You can't really go wrong with that bike, it should be more than sufficient for recreational road riding. I have a Motobecane Fantom 29 hardtail that I'm very happy with. If anything gets damaged in transit (it does happen), just contact them. They're pretty good about that sort of thing. The only thing I will add is that, as you're probably aware road tires can be very narrow (23mm). Being a mountain biker, you might prefer one of Motobecane's CX bikes that you can run wider tires on. Just a thought.
    Thanks, its good to know that Motobecane and Bikesdirect are legit. I really like your suggestion about the cycle cross bike. Bikesdirect has a CX with about the same spec for $60 more:

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._cross_cx3.htm

    I will definitely get one of the two bikes, but it’s hard to decide which. The CX is heavier, but the frame is burlier and more durable with its larger downtube and chainstays. The geo is also more relaxed, and, like you said, it has the ability to run wider tires. Coming off a 39lbs DH/FR bike these I things I can live with.But the road will be more effiecent for speed with its gearing, though less durable/comfortable. Hmm…

    The cyclecross:


    The road bike:

  4. #4
    Long Live Long Rides
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    Motobecane ok by me

    In 2006 I bought my first road bike after having been a mountain biker for 15 yrs. I bought a Motobecane Sprint Tour because I didn't want to spend a ton, but I didn't want to deal with components that were far below what I was used to. I chose to get a bike with a triple chainring because that better matches my spinning style. Overall I'm very happy with my Motobecane, the Ritchey wheels needed several truings to get settled in, but everything else was good quality and in good shape. The frame is basic, but I considered it a free frame with the purchase of a parts kit. I swapped out the saddle and handlebars pretty quick, but the rest of the bike is still stock.

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    As my standard answer, I have to say look at Craigslist. Now that I`ve said it, those Motobecanes are probably good buys (if you insist on new). Since you mention you`re 6` 5``, I double second what Gary said about 23mm tires. Chances are you`re well over 200 lb, which doesn`t completely eliminate the possibility of being happy on road race tires, but...
    Recalculating....

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
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    Just got a Windsor Wellington 3.0, same frame design, same fork, 100 dollars less and I am happy with it. I have only gone about 6 miles on it, but for those 6 miles I was comfy on very rough roads.



    I say the Motobecane is a good buy
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  7. #7
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    Bikes direct bikes

    Hello! I bought a Motobecane Vent Noir and I am pretty happy with that.
    The prices at bikesdirect are good deals.
    I would tell since the bikes are at good prices that you should buy a intermediate level bike.
    It is better for you a triple Tiagra Shifter sistem, like the Vent Noir or other in BD line.
    Greetings.

  8. #8
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AiresBecker
    Hello! I bought a Motobecane Vent Noir and I am pretty happy with that.
    Ah, Aires... I jumped when I read your post, thinking of another bike. Puch had a model called Vent Noir under the Austro Daimler label in the 1980s. They came in different component levels, but the frame (531, I think) was unique becuase of the special finish they gave it. Some kind of chrome first, then annodized- beautiful! And that`s what I thought you had. I was going to beg you for pictures until I realized it was a new model Motobecane you were talking about.

    Well, welcome and I hope you enjoy your new bike, too. I see you live in Brazil- I`ll forgive you for not posting pictures of a vintage AD Vent Noir if you post some pics from home

  9. #9
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    The Vent Noir

    Hi Rodar y Rodar!
    Yes mine is a new Vent Noir unfortunately, not the old one, but for the use I have it is a nice bike. I brought it from the last trip I made to US and it was worth.
    I saw the old Vent Noir, very beautiful, but not usable, at least for the rides a do, were I generally face bad pavement and the security is also not good. If I had a bike like that old Vent Noir I would frame it in my living room wall. And I would buy the one I actually have to ride. But any way I also appreciate bike styling.
    Thank you for your comment.
    I should post some pictures soon.
    Greetings from Brazil.
    Aires Becker

  10. #10
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    OP, I have a 'cross bike and I've done centuries on it... it's comfy for a full day in the saddle on the road and I'm not afraid to hit the logging roads or rail trail on it. If you think you might want to mix it up a bit and hit some dirt, it's worth thinking about. I was a pure mountain biker too when I decided to dabble in pavement rides, and the CX bike has served me well. It's not as light, but it opens the door for more options. You can set it up with very skinny road tires, or go as beefy as you want and make it dual-purpose. ..of course it's only a matter of time before you decide that you need a pure road bike too... sort of like how you need a hardtail and a full suspension mtb.
    I have a friend with a motobecane hardtail mtb from bikes direct, and it has been super solid for him. No experience with thier road/cross frames, but I would expect it to be good quality.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  11. #11
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    Hello, I also came from MTB to speed, in search of road performance. My vote, as you are asking: go for the Cyclocross. First you have the top mount levers that are really handy if you are used to ride MTB style, adapting you body to road bike, that is a biometric issue, I would also use a adjustable stem, as I did myself.
    Also the triple chain ring is important if are coming from MTB. Plus, little wider Cyclocross tires would give you more security and stability.
    But, since Bikesdirect have good prices I would go for little higher level, I would look for 27 speed tiagra triple derailleurs, I would try to buy a bether bike, as I did myself.
    Greetings.

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    IMHO, Sora shifters blow. They have a thumb button to release tension on the cable and, for me, it's in a pretty inaccessible place and I can't actually use that type of shifter when I ride with my hands on the brake hoods. A friend of mine had them on her bike and hated them. I think someone with largish hands would be less bothered.

    That bike also doesn't have low gears, which may or may not bother you - you'll be committed to doing a lot of your climbing out of the saddle. My commuter has pretty similar ratios, and on the way home from work with a bag of hand tools, it can be a bummer but I've always made it up the climbs.

    The 'cross version has a granny ring, which I like on a commute bike, but I still don't think the shifters are very good.

    Do you know your "magic number" on road bikes? I find fitting them to be a little more sensitive, and the top tubes run a lot shorter because of the drop bars.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Just to muddy the waters, I've never had a granny gear on my 'cross bike and I've never missed it.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  14. #14
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    Sure you canīt miss it if you never had it!
    I remember my first cel phone I was sure I would never need one.
    Now I canīt live without it.
    My microwave oven was the same.
    Once I had only one bike, I was sure I would never need another.
    Now I donīt tell you how many bikes I have.
    Sure I donīt need it.
    But I can agree with you, that is a question of personal use.
    Many people ride fixies without gearing and are happy with that.
    Greetings.

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