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  1. #1
    Killer of Chains
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    MTB bars on a Roadie?

    Anyone do this? Pixors?

  2. #2
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    I sold the bike for something with drop bars, and more tire clearance. The flat bars made the bike feel pretty short in the cockpit. You will probably want a pretty long stem. The one on my setup was too short. The bike was relatively comfortable (not bad for a short-mid length commute) but it was not easy to get low and out of the wind.

    I like drop bars, and the multiple hand positions they offer much better for road riding.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  3. #3
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    how would this feel vs a higher stem or something and traditional drops?... i still want another road bike... it's amazing how fast you feel/are when going from a MTB to a skinny tire bike
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    how would this feel vs a higher stem or something and traditional drops?... i still want another road bike... it's amazing how fast you feel/are when going from a MTB to a skinny tire bike
    My new setup is a cyclocross bike, which actually has the (drop) bars mounted quite high, due to lots of spacers under the stem. Like i said, i like the drop bar setup better, due to the three hand positions it offers. Since my bars are high, I can ride quite comfortably in the drops, and still have the hoods and the tops to change things up.

    Wind resistance is such an important factor when road riding. I feel it is pretty important to have a more aerodynamic position as well as a more comfortable position available.

    Last edited by rkj__; 11-03-2008 at 03:14 PM.
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  5. #5
    I Ride for Donuts
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    When I was building my current cyclocross-ish commuter, I almost put on some mtb riser bars, upside-down...cafe racer style. I wasn't sure how that hand position would feel with the slight downward angle though...I wound up with traditional drops, and I do like them for commuting on the road. I may go with time trial bars next time though, since I have found that I don't use the drops much. The top of my bars is fairly low anyway, and I have a long stem that lets me stretch way out when on the brake hoods, for a better wind-cutting position. Drops aren't much of an advantage when I really look at the angle of my body when on the hoods in my current set-up.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I have found that I don't use the drops much. The top of my bars is fairly low anyway, and I have a long stem that lets me stretch way out when on the brake hoods, for a better wind-cutting position.
    Which is somewhat opposite from what I have on my cross bike currently. You have a lot of options with a road bike.

    I use the hoods probably the most, closely followed by the drops, and I spend the least amount of time on the tops.
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  7. #7
    BIG and Bald
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    I tried the "roadie" bars for a couple of months but the position put a strain on my shoulders and elbows. Here is my Specialized Tricross with a set of mtb bars and an adjustable stem. You'll have to get new cables along with your new shifters. I'm very happy with the change.





    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  8. #8
    Killer of Chains
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    Part of my reasoning to try it out is because I'm riding around college, with lots of people, and I spend equal time between road and cutting on and off sidewalks and other things, and I feel that some flat bars would greatly increase agility. Since I'm not riding long distances, aerodynamics isn't much of a factor, especially since I have a dedicated road bike for that.

  9. #9
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    For commuting, I will take a riser and flatbar anytime over dropbar. Long or short distance.

    Comfortable and easy to handle. Most important, yr hands is always on yr gear shifter and brake in a comfortable position and u can react immediately for any situation.

  10. #10
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    I did this and the bike handles weird, its really twitchy. Its aside for a changeover when I get a hour and some ambition.
    KIN
    Yes its retro but IT WORKS!

    8 Speed is great and V-Brakes rock!

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  11. #11
    Can Tree Member
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    I ride with a very fit roadie who's got MTB flat bars on his Trek Madone. When I give him crap about it, he just kicks my ass on the hills. End of story.
    Dad is sad.
    Very, very sad.
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  12. #12
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    I will throw up a pic of my Trek Soho with a Crowbar and profile bar ends. The frame is very track/ road inspired IMO.



    I tried swapping to dropped bars on that bike, but the geometry was totally off and I couldnt get comfortable. Aside from city commuting, I regularly do 25+ mile rural rides on that bike as well and I dont have a problem or regret with the straight bars.

  13. #13
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    MTB straight bars are the only way to go, as far as I'm concerned. Like Pbody mentioned, they afford you much more agility for the various types of terrain and obstacles you encounter riding around town and they force you into a more comfortable, upright position. Plus, if you're already used to using them on MTBs you might as well go with whatever you're comfortable with. And aerodynamics be damned, I like the sound and feel of the wind in my face!
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  14. #14
    bi-winning
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    Sure, for tooling around campus, flat bars will work well.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  15. #15
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    typically

    road bikes have shorter top tubes so flat bars tend to not stretch you out enough which will cause some discomfort.

    flat bars offer only 1 had position, drops allow 3 plus

    get some top mount brake levers

  16. #16
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    Its not just comfort but safety that goes with flat bars. In the drops your torso is facing down and you have to tilt your head back to see the road. An upright riding position makes it easier to SEE what is going on around you. Very important when riding in traffic.

  17. #17
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    but you can ride

    Quote Originally Posted by nadinno78
    Its not just comfort but safety that goes with flat bars. In the drops your torso is facing down and you have to tilt your head back to see the road. An upright riding position makes it easier to SEE what is going on around you. Very important when riding in traffic.
    on the hoods or the tops (really good with top mount cx levers) and are or nearly as high.
    Compare the bar height (tops and hoods) of rkj's crosser and fireball and helmsdinii's.
    rkjs bars are as high in relation to saddle as the others, if not higher.
    If your commute is under 10 miles and fairly flat, flat bars would be fine. Otherwise I'd prefer road bars. My old commute was 13 miles uphill every AM and up to 42 miles home. Having only 1 hand position is in no way 'more' comfortable than having 3 and change.

  18. #18
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    I have a Giant that was built that way. It has the traditional MTB handle bar set with up with bar ends but has the 700c wheels, carbon fork, and ultegra 9 speed drive components, love it as a commuter and touring bike. The only change i made was adding a set of areo's to help lower my profile and add a third hand position

  19. #19
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    I used to commute with a flat bar road bike, but ended up on a drop-bar mtn bike. I found that I couldn't wind it up with the flat bars as well as I could from the hoods. Finally, being able to go from a sprint to braking was a lot easier on the hoods then it was on the flats. The bikes were both singlespeeds, so I need the extra mechanical advantage. In terms of body/head position, it's almost identical. I never ride in the drops, so I always have a full view of the road. If I need to get aero, I am equipped with an elbow joint halfway down my arm which seems designed to permit a more aggressive position.

  20. #20
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    it's like my drop bars

    have invisible aero bars, from years of riding road bikes
    drop into position
    set elbows on the top of the drop bar
    extend hands forward
    grab the invisible bars

    I like to brag how light they are, they weigh NOTHING!

  21. #21
    BIG and Bald
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    I probably wouldn't have switched to mtb bars if I could have found some wider drops. 44's came on my bike and 46 is the biggest I found in my search. From shoulder to shoulder I'm around 26" wide and the drop bars just played havoc with my shoulders and my elbows. Does anyone know if they make drops bigger than 46cm?
    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  22. #22
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    Nitto and Salsa

    both make 48s
    Syncros did as well, you can find NOS quite often and they are sturdy bars

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