Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    2

    Looking for a college beater

    I need a trek that is cheap but still awesome for riding around college + working out my legs during downtime.

    I ride bmx and get a great leg workout from that but from me moving to school now I am leaving my bike home. (no room for it in the apt) and won't leave it out in the rain.

    Right now my dad gave me a Schwinn World sport which is vintage but it's a 24" and im about 5'10.5 so it's a little hard to ride since it hurts a bit.

    I really like the schwinn super le tour but it's so expensive and I found a thread about college bikes and saw Trek 850 was a nice one.

    I found 2 on craigslist for about $100 each in working condition.

    Would that be a good bike for me? Or is there any cheaper ones I can find?

    I really like this guys setup:
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post




    ^ Sundown at 20F and dropping

  2. #2
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,723
    Welcome, Honeypot.

    Yeah, MechBgon has some nice bikes, don`t he? You sure it`s the bike that makes your mouth water, or the Thermos full of coffee? About Trek 850: I`m pretty sure that was Trek`s first forray into mountain bikes, though I recently found out they still keep or have reused at least some of their old model numbers for new entry level bikes. If it`s a newish bike, I have no idea except that you can`t go too far wrong for a price like that. For an old one from the 80s or 90s (steel frame, no suspension fork), and it fits okay, it`s a prime candidate for a medium distance commuter. The frames and parts were durable, dependable, and relatively light (light until you start decking them out with all that crap that neither I nor MechBgon seem to be able to live without).

    Though prices for used bikes vary a lot depending on your region, $100 is in the ballpark. Be prepared to spend more getting it into shape. When you look at 20 YO bikes, a lot of things inevitably happen- tires crack, grease gets gummy and turns to wax, brake pads dry up and get hard, stiff chain, old cable housings split... Figure another $100 for replacing all those "consumables" if you put your own labor into it, a bit more if you pay a shop to do it for you. You`ll still end up with a bike you`d be hard pressed to match for under $500 if you bought new. If you get lucky, maybe the previous owner has been on top of things, so you won`t need to do much, if anything.

    For the stuff you`ll need after the bike itself, nobody else knows. The bike you posted pics of has several hundred $ more invested into it for lights, racks, fenders, bags, studded tires, etc. You need to decide for yourself how much of that you need, how soon you need it (right now, or can wait until you find a good deal), how schnazzy, and whether you want commercial stuff or homebrewed. If you buy one, don`t forget to post pictures! Rigid mtbs have a pretty big fan club here
    Recalculating....

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Welcome, Honeypot.

    Yeah, MechBgon has some nice bikes, don`t he? You sure it`s the bike that makes your mouth water, or the Thermos full of coffee? About Trek 850: I`m pretty sure that was Trek`s first forray into mountain bikes, though I recently found out they still keep or have reused at least some of their old model numbers for new entry level bikes. If it`s a newish bike, I have no idea except that you can`t go too far wrong for a price like that. For an old one from the 80s or 90s (steel frame, no suspension fork), and it fits okay, it`s a prime candidate for a medium distance commuter. The frames and parts were durable, dependable, and relatively light (light until you start decking them out with all that crap that neither I nor MechBgon seem to be able to live without).

    Though prices for used bikes vary a lot depending on your region, $100 is in the ballpark. Be prepared to spend more getting it into shape. When you look at 20 YO bikes, a lot of things inevitably happen- tires crack, grease gets gummy and turns to wax, brake pads dry up and get hard, stiff chain, old cable housings split... Figure another $100 for replacing all those "consumables" if you put your own labor into it, a bit more if you pay a shop to do it for you. You`ll still end up with a bike you`d be hard pressed to match for under $500 if you bought new. If you get lucky, maybe the previous owner has been on top of things, so you won`t need to do much, if anything.

    For the stuff you`ll need after the bike itself, nobody else knows. The bike you posted pics of has several hundred $ more invested into it for lights, racks, fenders, bags, studded tires, etc. You need to decide for yourself how much of that you need, how soon you need it (right now, or can wait until you find a good deal), how schnazzy, and whether you want commercial stuff or homebrewed. If you buy one, don`t forget to post pictures! Rigid mtbs have a pretty big fan club here
    Ah, cool yeah I figured that. I ride bmx and I would check whats wrong with the bike and id have it all taken care of at my friends shop.

    so it's a good bike then? I'll keep looking and maybe try and scoop one for $75 or something

    Also I'm about 5"10 what size frame should I get?

  4. #4
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,041
    Fitting MTB's, as well as buying the GOOD vintage ones, requires some research. Specialized Rockhoppers from the 90's tend to run under 200 bucks and keep most modern standards. (Canti/direct pull brake bosses, 135/100 axles, 68mm bottom brackets)

    there are a lot of good, old rigid steel MTB's out there to choose from. I have a thing for the Chromoly Rockhopper. but a bit of knowledge about what you need and want from a bike will do a lot more than us trying to blanket your non-specific question in non specific advice. If you're 5'10 that means a little, but not a lot on fit. as a wide range of sizes may fit you based on your needs (I.E. a larger frame is not that big of a deal for commuting.) the window of sizing for you, in MTB terms. would probably be frames from 16.5 to 18.5 inches.

    If the bike is sized like a road bike you could honestly be looking at anything from 50-56cm in sizes. getting fit at a shop is worth it, or learn to do it properly yourself.

Similar Threads

  1. Egg Beater 3 ????
    By 1SPD in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-22-2013, 05:09 PM
  2. Egg Beater v. SPD
    By rowotter in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 97
    Last Post: 05-10-2013, 05:43 AM
  3. what are these egg beater things?
    By J2tha311 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-20-2012, 12:54 PM
  4. college, college, college... Seattle vs. Bellingham
    By adarn in forum NICA - High School - Collegiate Racing
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 03-22-2011, 01:21 PM
  5. Egg Beater 11 problems
    By vallinotti in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-04-2011, 11:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •