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  1. #401
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    Not sure what a one-click pawl slip would feel like. Could have worn pawls.

    Could be water/old congealed (like wax) grease interfering with the pawls:

    http://www.veloreviews.com/forum/top...-freehub-pawls

    Another site showing how to access, if you want to get in to look:

    http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/tech/...howfix_freehub

    I 'd try some triflow after warming the wheel to room temp, hoping to displace any moisture and soften hardened grease. Worth a shot or three. If it is dirt messing it up, you will need to diassemble, clean, lube, and reassemble. If worn, replace freehub.

  2. #402
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    Thanks. After hearing horror stories of frozen hubs, when mine worked fine last year I decided to just leave it alone (I think it's the only part that didn't get overhauled or replaced).

    Thinking about it a bit more though, my problem only happens under load so it is almost certainly the cassette. Which is just a little surprising. But now I'm feeling guilty, and will probably cleanout the freehub too.

    Phil's oil or motor oil for really cold temperatures? Should I put any grease in there too?

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled
    Phil's oil or motor oil for really cold temperatures? Should I put any grease in there too?
    I gave you the links, because I was 'Old School: Freewheels-only' until last year, so wanted to look it up, myself. Too few miles on the two freehubs to have issues (I hope). The disassembly site says use grease. I'd use good cycle grease like Phil's.

    On my freewheels, the cogs wore long before the dogs (aka pawls), and they only needed a bit of oil when they sounded too metallic on coasting. Motor oil is for motors with lots of additives that are not needed in a freehub. I had a Sunrace 7-speed freewheel (cheap in both senses) that did not appear to be much worn but it would skip and a new freewheel (and chain, replace both), fixed the problem.

  4. #404
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    I don`t have to mess with them because it doesn`t get that cold here. There`s an article at Ice Cycle by a guy who seems to know what he`s talking about who suggests a Lubriplate product called "Mag 1". I don`t know what that`s like, but we use a Lubriplate light grease on pneumatics that looks like slightly waterd down zinc oxide- probably very similar. He also suggests not doing anything special until you know you need to.

    http://www.icebike.org/Equipment/freehub.htm

    Brian, did you do anything special to your freewheels? Don`t freehubs and freewheels have pretty much the same internal pawl system? I have to admit I`ve never seen the guts of either except in pictures. When I get a spare 700 rear wheel, I`m going to try a freehub body replacement surgery (7-s to 8/9-s) on my current roadbike hub for familiarity purposes, but I don`t want to end up wheelless if it doesn`t go back together in a useable way
    Recalculating....

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    I Brian, did you do anything special to your freewheels? Don`t freehubs and freewheels have pretty much the same internal pawl system? I have to admit I`ve never seen the guts of either except in pictures.
    Short answers: No. And I think they look a lot alike.

    When I had the rear wheel off for any reason, I would spin the freewheel and listened to the whir. and watched it spin down. When lubricated well, the pawls are a bit muted and not as clicky/metallic. Added enough Triflow or Phil's to just get the slightly muted sound. Or if I though the freewheel was too loud on coasting, I'd lube it. Less is more in this case, I think you could wash the grease out if too generous.

  6. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    I don`t have to mess with them because it doesn`t get that cold here. There`s an article at Ice Cycle by a guy who seems to know what he`s talking about who suggests a Lubriplate product called "Mag 1". I don`t know what that`s like, but we use a Lubriplate light grease on pneumatics that looks like slightly waterd down zinc oxide- probably very similar. He also suggests not doing anything special until you know you need to.

    http://www.icebike.org/Equipment/freehub.htm

    Brian, did you do anything special to your freewheels? Don`t freehubs and freewheels have pretty much the same internal pawl system? I have to admit I`ve never seen the guts of either except in pictures. When I get a spare 700 rear wheel, I`m going to try a freehub body replacement surgery (7-s to 8/9-s) on my current roadbike hub for familiarity purposes, but I don`t want to end up wheelless if it doesn`t go back together in a useable way
    Good to see old friends here...

    Have had quite a few folks in at the shop suffering from FFS (frozen freewheel syndrome) and this is usually remedied by running some synthetic oil into the freewheel... this also flushes out any crud that might be causing things to stick.

    Freehubs can be serviced with the instructions provided at icebike.org which are excellent.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

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  7. #407
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    hehe... on this website "old friends" can sometimes equate to "bored at work and trolling multiple forums"

    yup, I've been waffling on what and how to get through this winter.
    gears would be so nice to run, but my WI freewheels have been dead dependable in the past.

    anyone know about shimano's older silent clutch hubs?
    vaguely remember someone mentioning that they're perfect for winter riding but can't remember why.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts
    hehe... on this website "old friends" can sometimes equate to "bored at work and trolling multiple forums"

    yup, I've been waffling on what and how to get through this winter.
    gears would be so nice to run, but my WI freewheels have been dead dependable in the past.

    anyone know about shimano's older silent clutch hubs?
    vaguely remember someone mentioning that they're perfect for winter riding but can't remember why.
    rodar and I pass each other at Bike Forums a good deal...

    The silent clutch models do not use pawls and depend on grease viscosity to move the drive cylinders into their pockets.

    I have some of these kicking around my shop and should probably use them for winter wheels although I really prefer my IGH for winter.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  9. #409
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    I think I set a personal low temp record this morning...friend said his car guage red- 7 F when he passed me. I had the week off for thanksgiving, and I was still wearing shorts in the afternoon the week before...heck of a re-introduction to winter!
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  10. #410
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    Yikes! We've only been down to 10F as far as I know. That deserves support! support! support! and

  11. #411
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    Just starting to see frost on the ground in the mornings here in Hamilton, Ontario.

  12. #412
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    We got a strange early arctic blast around here. Hasn't been above freezing in several days...for a high. Lows have been record setting for this time of year, some of the records that we broke during thanksgiving were from the 1930s. That was negative 7, by the way...read my post again...typing on my phone again. Thanks for the SUPPORT!
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  13. #413
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    CB - avatar = cat thawing out paws after going out in -7F with a metal gun in its paws and no gloves?

  14. #414
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    Freezing rain (just at dawn, about 0.5 " on vehicles) melted on warmer roads, and 20's last week, high 38. Yesterday the low was 38 and the high as almost 60 F but very windy. Yo-yoing and sudden drops are hard to get used to. A nice progression to lower temps doesn''t happen that often, but it sure is easier to deal with. People here don't believe that it wasn't that much colder where I grew up near Hamilton, Ontario, almost 400 miles North. They equate all of 'Canada' with the North Coast of Alaska. A lot less snow here than is typical of the Great Lakes Region. November rainfall is goung to be about 5" or 125+ mm, more that 3 X the toal rain from late July until end of October. So the drought is over but had 4" come earlier, a lot of farmers here would be a lot happier. I am happy so littel came as snow.

  15. #415
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    Picked up a New Pair Gloves today
    Sugoi Sub Zero Glove. Kind of like Lobsters but the Index finger is by itself
    I wore it like a mitten put all fingers in and left the index finger empty.
    glove were warm all the way home with a 15 mile ride 22 degrees and a nice little headwind


  16. #416
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    I just added the REI Novara Headwind pant to my collection of fall/winter/spring gear. Windproof up front, breathable in back, should work out good. Fit is a lil long due to me being short and fat but can't complain so far, the reviews are holding true on REI.

  17. #417
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    After commuting for 18 years without them, I have found Bar Mitts to be a great comfort in the extreme cold and wind we have here in Southern Idaho.

    Mikey

  18. #418
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    I havn`t posted here for a while.

    Within the last few weeks I was hit by a car one morning and left unconsious in the road.
    Another driver found me, and helped me to the hospital. I ruined some bar tape and rear gear but I feel lucky to have gotten away so lightly.

    I`m fine now and all my road rash has healed.

    Anyways, I got some money for new clothes (insurance) and this is now my setup this year.

    Endura Stealth extreme bib tights
    Rapha 3/4 roubaix tights
    Merino wool base layer jersey.
    Polartech fleece
    Rapha classic softshell

    dropbar barmitts

    I have been toasty warm on all days except this friday. -17 c and wind realy were out of my comfort zone. Its never been this cold in November before, so I guess its going to be a long winter.

    As for the barmitts, we were so impressed that we now have the Norwegian distribution on them.
    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

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  19. #419
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    I think the Bar Mitts are one of the best if not THE best invention that has come along for commuters in a long time!

  20. #420
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    [QUOTE=fux]I haven`t posted here for a while....I was hit by a car ...and left unconsious in the road. [QUOTE]

    No check-in required here. Aside from that, you have one heckuvan excuse!

    I guess I was mistaken, I thought Northern Europe in general, and Norway as a prime example, had a more responsible driver on average. Hope it was the rare exception. This is what I'd expect here from too many here, if the driver thought no one saw him. Cripes, hit and left in the road and left unconscious! Concussions can be fatal left untreated. Thank goodness a more responsible person showed up.

    Other than possibly mounting a video camera, did you learn anything to make you/us safer?

    About -20 C is as low as I have gone here because my boots weren't up to it. Santa is fixing that, so those Bar Mitts might be needed, too.

  21. #421
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    ditto!
    glad you're ok fux!!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  22. #422
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    Wow, Fux . I thought the same way Brian did. Very glad it didn`t turn out more serious. The extra clothes is a small consolation, but at least you got something of a silver liner.
    Recalculating....

  23. #423
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    woke up groggier than usual... familiar... but... oh that's why.
    body reacting to the pressure difference and the snowfall.
    about 2 inches or so?
    studded tires laughed at me from inside the house, b@stards!
    tomorrow I take my revenge on them for not being on my wheels where they belong.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  24. #424
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    Thanx for the concern fella`s.

    Iv`e been commuting to work for 5 years and this was the first time iv`e had an accident (touch wood). I had some nasty road-rash and a headache.

    I was off the bike for a week, so I`m counting my lucky stars. Can`t dwell on the past I suppose.

    Today was a whole different commuting kettle of fish....

    -10c (how the heck you fellas can ride in -7f is beyond me, Kudo`s all round!), sheet ice on the road full of frozen ruts and tracks, with 2cm`s of powder made for quite a ride. 25 minutes longer than normal and I was pretty cold because coudn`t keep up speed like I normaly can.
    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

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  25. #425
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    Just found a temp converter and it says -7f is -22C.

    That I suppose means kudo`s to me too because that the average temp here in feb.... but I woudn`t do colder, thats my absolute max. Thats around the time nose hairs freeze under my wooly buff, and you can feel your eyelids sticking when you blink..

    BBrrrrr....
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  26. #426
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    Fux, glad you are OK, but that sounds like a pretty scarey experience. Congrats on getting back on the bike, and may you be surrounded by safe drivers in the future.

    Your Rapha stuff looks real nice, though I would suggest they offer a brighter color in the women's jacket like they do the men's, instead of just black, white, & blue.

  27. #427
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    Thanx.

    I have the softshell jacket which just comes in black and red (I have the red one), and your right, it only comes in black for the ladies.

    Its the best cycle spesific jacket I`ve ever owned. The fold down storm flap is permenatly out at the moment because of the large reflective logo on it. It also has reflective piping which you can`t see in daylight.

    The shammy in the shorts is fantastic. apparently the same type Assos use.

    I`m so pleased that i asked my wife to buy me their winter jersey for christmas, and I will proberbly buy the softshell gillet when its back in stock in my size.

    I suppose you could say iv`e been conned by the fancy pictures and hype, but it realy looks/feels/ and works as wel as the hype. imo.

    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

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  28. #428
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    4-8" was forecast for this weekend, but did not materialize. Snowed most of the time but somehow did not amount to much. Did a nice trailride Sat, pretty, snowing and about 1" on the ground...studded Nokians packed up a bit with snow, I'm thinking because there were some iced over puddles that I rode through, making the snow stick just like it can on skiis if you go through a wet spot. I'm a little late winterizing my summer equipment:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-mow-snow.jpg  


  29. #429
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    Got to the middle twenties yesterday but stayed in the lower teens here today. Snowed on Saturday.
    First Week of winter and a little snow and way below normal average temps and 139 mile logged in December so far all on a Fixed Gear.

  30. #430
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    5" of snow or so and 15F this a.m. Plow had been through already so my commute wasn't bad. Decided to stick with just the five-ten hi-top shoes I use for trailriding along with wool socks & surprisingly my feet were still warm enough. Appreciated the fleece neck warmer, though, could tuck it up to my eyes on the downhill and then lower it when I warmed up. Finally replaced my lost sunglasses, wasn't crazy about the look of the ones I mail ordered, but decided to try them & they worked well, cut out more wind to the eyeballs than most. They are Panoptx Avantis, Sierra Trading Post has them for $39 from $199. Coupon code good thru 12/9 is EB120710A for an extra 30% off a bunch of stuff.
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  31. #431
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    Low 30s around here when I go into work. I get off at 1030 at night so its mid 20s. Been rocking a Endura Venturi II jacket and a smartwool top and tights with knickers been fine so far.

  32. #432
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    Fux...dang! Glad you're ok. Couple of notes...I have Sugoi subzero tights and they are awesome, I'm sure the gloves are nice too. My PI lobsters are good to low single digits (F), but beyond that I get tingly fingers.

    I started wearing my snowboard helmet this winter...way warmer and it has ear warmers built in...that and a 'clava and I'm a happy camper. Can't believe I didn't think of that years ago.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  33. #433
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    commuterboy- i love the snowboard helmet + balaclave + goggles combo for headgear. with an extra bit to keep mny nose covered i've been good down to -20F windchill for 45-60 mins. my current issue in iowa, is the windchills are getting bad, and my gloves are wearing out. need new ones and don't know what do get. thinking the louis garneau lobster style ones, but also pondering bar mitts, or both.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  34. #434
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    It`s been so nice around here (between rains) that you`d think it was May. Really wierd- we got definite winter for a few weeks, below zero temps and a few snowstorms (although they hardly dropped any snow at valley levels), and then... well, I`ve found myself working outside again with no jacket whatsoever. It`s hard to imagine real winter going on elsewhere. Currently busting my butt to get a shed built, or at the very least to get all the cement work done before winter comes back. I don`t want to have a half finished project sitting in the yard and going to pot for the next four or five months.
    Recalculating....

  35. #435
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    Wind Chill+Regular Gloves=
    Wind Chill+Regular Gloves+Bar Mitts=

    Mikey

  36. #436
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    studded tires are slow...
    I know it should be self-evident, but for reference, run slicks on your mtb, then the next day run heavy knobbies, it's that difference.
    It's not the weight, heavy tires keep spinning once you get them up there.
    It's that they're heavy and highly resistant to rolling, so a lot more like a heavy knobby tire. More effort to get them there, more effort to keep them there.
    BUT: uphill and curves on ice with the trailer and not one slip! so to that.

    as to the buzzing they make:
    "my bike has a creak, a wiggle and a clunk... now it's got a scritch!"
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  37. #437
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    A slow trip in due to headwinds, luckily I'd left plenty early so I made the bus. Got too hot despite the 9F & wind, working harder. Tried out my new pogies, and they were like a toaster oven, my hands were the warmest part of me. Not sure if I should carry them on the trip home uphill, or maybe I'll try them with no gloves.

    Had 1 dodo pass me on the blind curve and another pass me on the downhill where I was already going 30mph in a 25. I think some people just get nervous driving behind a bike, especially in winter.

    It gets light during my commute and I switch the headlight to flash mode - very impressed with the reflection off distant street signs in daylight, it must be pretty visible.

    CB, you have inspired me to try to modify a multisport helmet I have with a liner/earwarmers. It only has a few vents & they have screening on them (for bugs I guess), so to mount my helmet light I will have to try cutting the screening to get the strap for the light through.

  38. #438
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    CB, you have inspired me to try to modify a multisport helmet I have with a liner/earwarmers. It only has a few vents & they have screening on them (for bugs I guess), so to mount my helmet light I will have to try cutting the screening to get the strap for the light through.
    Sheldon Brown's idea of using packing tape to cover the vents works well on my bike helmet, So you might wish to add that mod. I may look into a winter helmet.

  39. #439
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    Ahhhh 8C and only 22 kph head wind.

    gotta love an easy Chinook.

  40. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Sheldon Brown's idea of using packing tape to cover the vents works well on my bike helmet, So you might wish to add that mod. I may look into a winter helmet.

    That's exactly what I did with my helmet.

  41. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeyonthemadone
    Wind Chill+Regular Gloves=
    Wind Chill+Regular Gloves+Bar Mitts=

    Mikey

    To combat cold and windchill, I bought a pair of 3mm neoprene rafting gloves and a pair of military surplus rag-wool gloves. The combo worked great at 28*F with a 5-8MPH headwind and going approx. 10-12MPH.

  42. #442
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    @cda:
    Wool on the inside, neoprene outside? I used to wear wool inside of leather, but on the rare occasions the leather got wet it sapped the heat right through the wool. Then I switched to canvas gardening gloves for the outside and the wool inners didn`t fit as well, so switched them for thin polyester gloves from the supermarket, which aren`t as warm. Neoprene sounds good.
    Recalculating....

  43. #443
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    -5F when I left this morning. More trouble with glasses fogging than with the cold though. Probably should have gone with the goggles.

  44. #444
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    -8C with 40km winds (feels like -17C) tomorrow. It's going to suck. My biggest problem is cold air. Basically I feel chest being constricted whole day after some heavy breathing outside. I probably should slow down... but there's this hill...

    Not sure what I'm going to do if temperature drops even more. With windchill it gets out of uncomfortable right into i-think-i-am-gonna-die zone.

  45. #445
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    Just checking in, been commuting year round for a couple years now, worst was wind chill of -22F, actual was -10ish. Last week it was single digits, with the wind chill in the negatives, and it's only December! The worst is yet to come. Thanks for the info on studded tires. I'll bypass the DIY ones. In years past I just aired down to around 15, and it worked well enough. I have a touring bike I usually ride, but once the salt goes on the road, it's an old mtb that I don't care much about.

  46. #446
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    It has been in and around the negative digits here too, -9 being the coldest with windchill so far. Upstate NY had 10-degrees ambient temperature last week, today was 50-degrees, all of the snow has melted but we're getting more of Lake Ontario's lake affect snow in the upcoming 48-hours! I've been adding my snowshoeing and running to the 9-mile (one-way) commute.

    The days that are too dangerous to ride with my studded tires I opt for the snowshoes and hiking (running) footwear. Sure it takes 2.5-hours but it's definitely safer, and a nice change from the bike ride (18-miles each day gets old).

    90-miles each week is great exercise. I love that I'm able to do it at the age of 32 and hope to keep it up until I'm well past my retirement years!

  47. #447
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    Todays Ride, In the Morning 22 degrees with Drifting snow with a 25-35 mph wind
    The Wind was so bad that in the picture Below, I was blown off the road but didn't crash :~)
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5255747431/" title="December Indian Trail Rd by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/5255747431_64517825be_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Indian Trail Rd" /></a>

    Ride home tonight 18 degrees Blowing drifting snow worse than this morning same winds

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5255748091/" title="December Snow at M&amp;M by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5289/5255748091_59b1a6294e_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Snow at M&amp;M" /></a>

  48. #448
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    We went from 8 inches of frozen snow and ice to 60 degrees here in Southern Idaho today. I was out on a road ride in a short sleeve jersey and base layer. Back to winter by mid week, though with my luck it will be cruddy tomorrow morning. Stay tough, be safe out there.


    Mikey

  49. #449
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    The coldest night of the season is tonight, currently -12F, with a forecasted high of 5F tomorrow. Luckily my commute is short and I have a new bike to ride so there's no way a little "chill" is gonna keep me from riding!

  50. #450
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    Normbilt: When my sidepulls/rims look like that I have NO brakes. The usual drag the brakes for a ways until the rims wipe clear that works for rain does nada. So I have been thinking hub brakes. Packard ads used to say "Ask the man who owns one..." You have lots of miles and winters and brake pads of experience. My guess is that you leave you bike out and so it doesn't have warm rims to melt the snow and ice up. Thoughts?

  51. #451
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Normbilt: When my sidepulls/rims look like that I have NO brakes. The usual drag the brakes for a ways until the rims wipe clear that works for rain does nada. So I have been thinking hub brakes. Packard ads used to say "Ask the man who owns one..." You have lots of miles and winters and brake pads of experience. My guess is that you leave you bike out and so it doesn't have warm rims to melt the snow and ice up. Thoughts?
    This Bike is a Fixed Gear. Brakes work fine!
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5255748091/" title="December Snow at M&amp;M by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5289/5255748091_59b1a6294e.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="December Snow at M&amp;M" /></a>

  52. #452
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    We're drowning in cold rain, almost 6" in the last 2 days, our snow is receding, slush is king. Drove in but brought the bike for possible commute home, supposed to be colder and snow this afternoon, and teens (F) tonight.

  53. #453
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    My greatest riding fears are the cross-winds pushing me into traffic when they are above 20-MPH. The road is north/south while the winds are east/west. The wheels have a lot of surface area that create great challenge when controlling the bike's path; the difference between road-rash or a body-bag is not a difficult choice for me when I have four other options to complete my commute: walk/hike, run/jog, snowshoe, bike, and least desirable and chosen is to drive.

    Average times in any weather for my last 45-trips in November/December:
    o 38 to 45-minutes to bike 9-miles with a 20-pound backpack.
    o 1-hour and 12-minutes to run/jog 9-miles with a 20-pound backpack.
    o 2-hours and 20-minutes to comfortably jog/snowshoe 9-miles (mounting/dismounting the snowshoes 4-times (60-seconds each)) with a 20-pound backpack.
    o 3-hours to walk/hike with a 40-plus pound backpack.
    o 20 to 35-minutes to drive the 10-miles to work

    All so I can get to work at 0630.

  54. #454
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    studs n gears studs n gears makin serious time with my studs n gears!
    windchill factor put the world at -20 C. (-4 F?)
    noone (that I saw) threw their car sideways today.
    "it is a good day" I thought.

    but the coffee machine at work is broken, so now the day is mediocre.
    but I think tonight, I will take the mountain bike out and tour the park.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  55. #455
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normbilt
    This Bike is a Fixed Gear. Brakes work fine!
    I think you misunderstand me.

    Yeah, that's my point. If your brakes did not, you wouldn't be around to post here with your mileage.

    Fixie helps, too. I am trying to figure out why your rim brakes obviously work and mine as obviously, don't. Could save me some cash and some anxiety/injury. Am I wrong in remembering that your bike resides out of doors between rides? If so, cold rims rather than warm ones melting snow, then getting an ice layer may be the source of my problem. Before I try deep freezing the bike, I thought I'd check to see if that is a difference in the two situations.

    Appreciate the help.

    Studded tires arrived in spite of heavy for here, snows today.

  56. #456
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    -25C windchill. Actually wasn't as horrible as I imagined. My bike however snapped a spoke. and I have nothing to replace it with... **** it, 35 more to go... or is it 33? ... 31 actually. ugh.

  57. #457
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    -25C is around is around -10F. By next month that is a "warm" day around here....sad I know!

    I don't think that temperature zone is bad if you're active, no movement equals cold body parts for me. Otherwise -10 down to -20 is tolerable. A face mask to cover the mouth while breathing is a necessity, my lungs don't like that much cold air. It's really cool when your nostrils temporarily freeze together.

  58. #458
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    A winter wonderland this morning, 9F and 4-5" snow, but I heard the plow go by so it was pretty easy going, I did not have to talk myself down from a death grip on the bars. Downtown it was greasier snow from traffic & salt, and no room, so I opted for the bus at about mile 4. Loving the pogies from dogwood designs. I ziptied them together as I was a little worried that despite the cinches around the bars that one might fly off on the bus, now I don't have to worry. So far this week the :"you're gnarly" type comments are outnumbering the "you're crazy" comments.

  59. #459
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    Maiden voyage for the new brake levers, bar tape, transferred B17, and Nokian A10's. (Saves Kathryn the trouble of wrapping them for going under the tree. I'm thoughtful like that. )

    White pack and slack (too cold for slush, not quite pack yet), A little wiggly but not threatening a face plant every 15 seconds as my Panaracers, or the Michelin City tires do. Could justify an even more aggressive tread but I'd have to make some other changes. This is about as bad a road conditions as I can trust motorists with here.

    Thinking that my brake issues were from riding just below freezing with snow on the road and/or in the air, today no issues at all. Rode the back yard to the lane in and out no issues with a freshly warm bike. So that narrows the danger 'no brakes' zone to the 28-32 * F with snow or rain. Opens up more rideable days!

    Retired bike shorts help blue jean & underlayer seam issues a lot.

    "You rode?"
    "Studded bike tires."
    "Really?" Sort of a mixed crazy/awesome tone. Better than the usual crazy, anyway.

  60. #460
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    Phew! Our strangely beautiful weather that`s been making me feel so guilty for the past few weeks went away. It still doesn`t look like the winter you gnarly folks back east have, more like.... Seattle spring? It`s still warm (???) but been raining since last night. Puddles and mud reign out in my yard. Windy all last night and this morning, but that seems to have stopped now.
    Recalculating....

  61. #461
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    Felt colder waiting for bus tonight, 10F when I left work but 0 when I got home. Kept on all my layers (usually I take one off since its uphill & often not as cold as sunrise) and was OK. Hardest part probably pushing the bike up the 6" of unplowed untracked stuff in my driveway. Kid on bus "isn't it a little cold to bike?" Me: "Yes." His dad or mom's boyfriend, badboy, in shorts, "it could be worse". Mom "Yeah, but you're wearing shorts" Me:"Yeah, I could be in shorts!".

  62. #462
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    go my new LG gloves today at the shop. tried the on the way home. Verdict: very warm. was 19F with a 10F or so windchill. Much longer and i coulda been sweating a bit. so far so good. only potential downside is the cuffs are a bit short, but still cover everything just fine, i'm just used to a somewhat longer cuff. linkage:http://www.louisgarneau.com/us-en/pr...TYPHOON_GLOVES
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  63. #463
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    Flour power or petal power?

    None of the above, really- just a cool link a friend sent me with no hippies, bakers, or florists. Cool article about a guy (in Illinois?) who plows his local MUT with homebuilt, self designed plows that he tows behind his bike. Thought some of you guys might find it as interresting as I did.


    http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/pbar/organ...Bike_Plow.html
    Recalculating....

  64. #464
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    Loved the link rodar! I wonder if he'll try e-bike power assist next?

  65. #465
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    @cda:
    Wool on the inside, neoprene outside? I used to wear wool inside of leather, but on the rare occasions the leather got wet it sapped the heat right through the wool. Then I switched to canvas gardening gloves for the outside and the wool inners didn`t fit as well, so switched them for thin polyester gloves from the supermarket, which aren`t as warm. Neoprene sounds good.

    I also use NRS 3mm neoprene Boundry Sock with Hydro Cuff (Also a rafting-using product) for my sock layer. It's long enough to cover my entire calf. I put those on first and then put on my long-john bib over them.

    Now mind you, when you take off said neoprene socks, your feet will be sweaty. But your feet will be WARM and sweaty. And the sweat will quickly dissipate. I fully subscribe to the vapor barrier method of staying warm. So I'm applying my mountaineering (Beginner) skills to my first Winter biking/commuting !


  66. #466
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    Overdid it on last night's and this morning's "commute" to friend's house from work. Snowy and 5-10F in both directions, slow going with the snowy shoulders, took 2-21/4 hrs of riding time each way. Missed the last bus that would have taken me up the hill past the ski area another 5mi to her door...called and she picked me up but wasn't happy as she was already parked for the night and she got a chill and frozen feet driving the 10 mi RT (although I apologized, I was probably lacking in the sympathy department, having just ridden 2hrs). It was an adventure, but I won't be repeatng it anytime soon in those conditons. A few pix I took this morning. In the first one, the river is flowing away from you and over a dam/falls, creating the heavy icy mist on the trees.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-falls.jpg  

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-snowroad.jpg  

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-river.jpg  


  67. #467
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    A little spurt of winter to the Denver area...finally. Woke up to low teens and a mighty 1/2" of snow!

    Made fresh tracks the whole way in. I don't know why, but this was the sparkliest snow I've ever seen. Thousands of sparkles as I rode through the dark, it was like riding through diamonds!

    Temperatures looking to be back in the 50's by Sunday, no white Christmas here.
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  68. #468
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    I just ordered a set of 26" Hakkapeliitta W240 studded tires.

    26"X1.9", 240 carbide studs


    This will be my first experience with studded tires !


  69. #469
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    Be careful out there!

    <object width="448" height="336"><param name="movie" value="http://images.stupidvideos.com/2.0.2/swf/video.swf?sa=1&sk=7&si=2&i=40029"></param><embed src="http://images.stupidvideos.com/2.0.2/swf/video.swf?sa=1&sk=7&si=2&i=40029" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="448" height="336"></embed></object>

  70. #470
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    I think you misunderstand me.

    Yeah, that's my point. If your brakes did not, you wouldn't be around to post here with your mileage.

    Fixie helps, too. I am trying to figure out why your rim brakes obviously work and mine as obviously, don't. Could save me some cash and some anxiety/injury. Am I wrong in remembering that your bike resides out of doors between rides? If so, cold rims rather than warm ones melting snow, then getting an ice layer may be the source of my problem. Before I try deep freezing the bike, I thought I'd check to see if that is a difference in the two situations.

    Appreciate the help.

    Studded tires arrived in spite of heavy for here, snows today.
    Sorry Brian,
    I don't rely on brake that much. I ride in rural area. I use the fixed gear to control my speed

  71. #471
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normbilt
    Sorry Brian,
    I don't rely on brake that much. I ride in rural area. I use the fixed gear to control my speed
    'S'alright! I think I'm onto the situation/issue. Brakes worked great this week with snow all over them and the rims. Nothing like having the right equipment (stuuded tiers with agressive tread).

    The only times I had issues in the past were with temps just below freezing with snow falling, blowing, or on the roadway and a warm bike, oh and a steep downhill. I am looking to confirm that theory. I thought of going fixie as a way to deal with it, too. No issues in dry weather on dry roads down to about -10. I am getting more experience with snow covered streets. It's very unusual to last more than a couple of days before sublimation clears the roads.

  72. #472
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    14 mile ride home 11 degrees with a 10mph headwind
    Picture this morning low teens
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5269815285/" title="December Snow 2010 03 by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5242/5269815285_4cc99aa79d_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Snow 2010 03" /></a>
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5270424280/" title="December Snow 2010 02 by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5287/5270424280_02c255b2bb_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Snow 2010 02" /></a>

    Sorry for the blur taking picture while riding home Sunday Night
    The Lazy Farm
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5255748421/" title="The Lazy Farm in December by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5208/5255748421_d9476c6beb_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="The Lazy Farm in December" /></a>

  73. #473
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    Cold, sunny mornings- love `em! Usually, dirty snow like the tracked `N packed stuff on the road turns me off, but for some reason that pic makes me want to ride there.


    We`re back to normal December weather here, finally. It started snowing around four or five this morning and apparently has kept on falling gradually since then. At least I know it snowed until I went to bed around noon, and when I got up tonight, the tracks I had made while working out in the yard were all gone and it`s been snowing since. We have about 7 to 8 inches of heavy wet snow and no signs that the plows have been out. Since my commute is mostly on low traffic roads, there was plenty of untracked snow near the edges, but I couldn`t push through it, so ended up trying to stay in the car tracks. PITA. Everything was drifted over and very hard to see my line- kept drifting off the tracks, then getting sucked into the muck and having to do a little snakey shuffle, losing all my momentum, then start again to pick it back up and lose it again. Still, it was better than driving. Took me 25 minutes to get in. If I had driven, it would have taken fifteen or twenty to chain up, then at least another 15 on the road with frozen fingers from the putting on the chains.
    Recalculating....

  74. #474
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    We did have similar conditions to your post.

    This week we got snow, then a couple of hours of melting followed by -6 so the melted snow froze ti ice and now we have about a foot of powder on top of the ice.

    Its put my cyclocrosser out of commision for a while. Not being one to give up all too easily I fit a pair of schwalble Ice spiker pro 2,35 on my MTB yesterday. I was hoping to give them a try today. I`ll try to take some pictures.
    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

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  75. #475
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    Just ordered these NRS Reactor gloves. These are also rafting gloves made of entirely 3.5mm neoprene.







    The other pair of gloves (Which I am shipping back) has synthetic leather on the palms and fingers that absorbed snow/water like a sponge. They're also made of neoprene but only 2mm and 3mm thick while the ones I just ordered are entirely made of 3.5mm thickness (No synthetic leather).

    Here are pics of the gloves I'm sending back:




  76. #476
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    The ride home at 2PM sure is better than the ride to work at a 4:45 am. These are the day I like Sunny and 27deg.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-commuter-pics.jpg  


  77. #477
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    Rode home 24 degrees and in the height of the snow fall. Without studs. It was Snowing pretty hard and collecting fast. I think it snow 3" in and hour.
    Wasn't much traffic thank god. I had a hard time seeing the road. I turned off the Helmet light and used handlebar light.

    After the Last Week 24 Degrees felt warm!

    The Lazy Farm at Night
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5279379300/" title="December Snow dark by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5084/5279379300_a1029c2e03_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Snow dark" /></a>

    The Lazy Farm at Night Enhanced
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/5278773705/" title="December Snow Enhanced by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5048/5278773705_cafc16976c_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="December Snow Enhanced " /></a>

  78. #478
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    ^^ Very pretty...bet you were glad to get home though. Safe journeys to all.

  79. #479
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    This years last ride..... time to get the ski`s out.

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-dsc00185.jpg

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-dsc00186.jpg

    Happy new year folks!

    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

    instacrap ----> http://instagram.com/manx71/

  80. #480
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    Looks like a lot of work, but very pretty, Fux.
    Happy new year to you too.
    Recalculating....

  81. #481
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    About 1 inch (3 cm) last night and the night before but it sublimated by noon both days. Didn't get a Christmas Day ride in. But got a 15 mile Boxing Day one in (day after Xmas to non-Commonweathians). It is blowing a little, but I took the good bike without the studded tires. No ice or pack to speak of and the blow in areas weren't too bad, though the snows would have been more secure in footing (tire-ing?)

    The new boots are supposed to be good to -20 F. Used the new Silk/wool blend socks (no rash or itch, so far so good) and the longer silk "under socks" meant for skiing. Not enough sock. Or Boot. Or both. Feet were not icy, but not comforatble either. It's a relatively balmy 29 F (-2 C) 20 mph (32 kph) NNW and wind chill about 16 F (-9 C, the exposed parts of the face agree). So not exactly the -5 to -10 F I was hoping they'd be good for, though with more socks. The hands were fine to cool fingers with my lightest gloves, saying the conditions were mild to cool. On the return mostly with the wind the belaklave was heading to a bit warm and the toes stopped getting colder. Bar Mitts missed Santa's Sleigh.

    Happy New Year!

  82. #482
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    With the weather seeming to move in early this year, I'm second guessing my choice not to move to Las Cruces this summer. I'm tired of having to take 5 minutes to get suited up to ride to and home from work or errands.

  83. #483
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    Too snowy, but mostly too windy for me today, drove instead and brought xc skis to get out at lunch. Should be about a foot by this afternoon. My rear window was open yesterday 1" for my friend's dog, & I forgot about it (the window, not the dog), so I had a nice snowdrift inside the car. I also found a mouse nest when I lifted up the rear seat yesterday...seems silly, but I guess I should set a trap in the car.

  84. #484
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    Quote Originally Posted by wvucyclist
    With the weather seeming to move in early this year, I'm second guessing my choice not to move to Las Cruces this summer. I'm tired of having to take 5 minutes to get suited up to ride to and home from work or errands.
    When I get upset over the time it takes, I remember my father rode a democrat (springless buggy) to high school. Over 20 minutes getting the horse hitched and headed out, the reverse at the livery, then the walk to school, repeat in reverse to come home. In winter, he skated the 6 miles down the river then back into the wind usually. So it could be lots worser! (as Jerry of Tom and Jerry would say.)

  85. #485
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    When I get upset over the time it takes, I remember my father rode a democrat (springless buggy) to high school. Over 20 minutes getting the horse hitched and headed out, the reverse at the livery, then the walk to school, repeat in reverse to come home. In winter, he skated the 6 miles down the river then back into the wind usually. So it could be lots worser! (as Jerry of Tom and Jerry would say.)
    Kind of put things into perspective; doesn't it ?!

  86. #486
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    Ok, fellas some of you may remember me venting in the summer with 100% humidity and 85°F mornings, I’m not missing those warmer temps just yet but I need a few tips from the colder climate commuters…

    I’ve been playing around with a old IMBA/Performance vest I found in my coat closet (forgot I had it) this thing says its 100% poly but it seems like fleece to me. Any moderate activity and +30°F you’ll sweat for sure, so I have been playing with layers and mild winter jerseys and had good results. Even picked up some cheapo thermal socks from Academy and feet are fine.

    My problem lies with gloves (although I’ll admit I have not tried anything more general cycling gloves, layered with cotton gloves and recently a paid of Adidas athletic gloves (100% poly). I need a pair of thermal gloves that are light and thin enough to bike (and run – I jog most mornings also) so no mitten protectors, etc. The temps here rarely ever get below 20 on the worst winter day. However, I have Raynaud's phenomenon where my fingertips and toes will sometimes go numb and white in colder temps so I am a bit abnormal in needing warmth more appropriately.

    I still wear gloves when it’s 40 or 50 sometimes when I run, but the cotton or poly gloves do fine for that range, I just need something a bit better when it’s colder. I hate to take a chance and order the wrong set from Nashbar or whatever so I figured it’s best to ask here.

    Sorry for the ramble, thanks for any help.

  87. #487
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    Reynaud's makes foot and hand warming difficult. Prying cold white fingers off the handlebars at the end of a ride when you did not wear enough hand protection or braking with one hand because the other is no longer working adds a certain je ne sais quoi to a ride. The lovely burning prickles as fingers or toes rewarm is another thrill. Brother's been diagnosed, I have not been, but the symptoms match up.

    I have learned that keeping the lower arms warm helps prevent the blood cutoff for me. Looking for why, I found that this added effect may be age related, as studies show a difference in blood flow to extremities as cyclists age if their forearms are cooled. YMMV.

    I get relief with layers of gloves/mitts as temperature drops, too. Fingerless Cycling gloves give way to isotoner thinsulates at about 60 * F, at 40 * F I put the fingerless inside the Isotoners. At about 30 * F the finger tips get cold so, I have a cloth glove/poly hand knit mitt combo, below that I add another larger flip end hand knitt mitt over the isotoner/cycling gloves. DT shifters are superior for shifting with these on. I have the advantage of having acquired these gloves and mitts over time living in colder climes and having a Mother In Law who knits and likes me (blessed, I know). Strong winds can be a problem still, but I have a set of Bar Mitts coming, that will help with that. Cheaper than winter cycling gloves, and it works for me. YMMV.

    So if you have access to larger pairs of mitts or gloves, this might be a stopgap until you get a glove that works for you.

  88. #488
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    Edited for Political Correctness:

    Hope this has not been asked in this thread already, but I just don't have the time to read the whole thread. Do you guys/gals who roll studded tires just ride them all winter snow or not? I haven't been riding much lately and want to get back on, but its icy at best around here and we're probably going to get some more snow before the season is over. So, did you just buy the best (schwalbe, nokian...) and ride them or do you swap them out on the days there isn't any snow/very little ice?

    I need to make a tire change, so I figure you winter commuters are the best source for a good answer since my local shop says "NEVER ride studs on pavement."

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Dalton; 01-03-2011 at 10:16 AM.

  89. #489
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    Dixie,

    If the Adidas gloves are relatively thin, like the ones made for runners, you might be best with another glove that can fit over them, then you can switch to the thinner ones or take out the liners if you warm up. I liked some I got from Planet Bike on sale for this purpose, until I lost them in the supermarket parking lot in a snowstorm (dang, they cart the snow away somewhere too). I believe they were the Planet Bike Aquilo Gloves...note the semi-lobster claw design. With my regular size they still fit a liner glove in comfortably.
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  90. #490
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton
    Do you guys who roll studded tires just ride them all winter snow or not? ....I need to make a tire change, so I figure you winter commuters are the best source for a good answer since my local shop says "NEVER ride studs on pavement."

    Thanks!
    This gal keeps them on all winter and rides them on pavement about 12 miles/day..the other 3 miles is a dirt road, or what we call "ice pavement" at this time of year. Most manuf say to go easy on pavement for x miles at first to seat the studs on new tires...but either I must always "go easy", or I just haven't noticed any problem with not following this advice. I think it's a CYA in case any studs go missing.

  91. #491
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    It dropped from 46 F yesterday to 15 F this a.m., so I had a nice dry commute. Glad I didn't pay too much attention to the wind part of the weather forecast, because I ended up with headwinds the whole way, a steady 15-20 mph, with gusts up to 60 I see now. My legs were burning, they will feel it on the way home uphill.

    I finally modified the Smith multisport helmet to fit my helmet light, I cut the screen over the small vents and was able to sneak 2 zip ties through. The vents and screen are apparently for looks mostly, because the styrofoam directly under them was solid. Wore it with the winter liner it came with but no other hat or headband (but with fleece neck warmer), and was toasty warm. It may be too toasty for the uphill ride home, we'll see...
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  92. #492
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    BrianMc – you nailed it. I have not been medically diagnosed but I have been dealing with it long enough to know the symptoms and how to deal with it. You pegged it too at 30°F I have tried both fingerless/finger cycling gloves underneath Isotoners with no success. Although this morning was less of fingertips numb/white and more of just painful (it was probably crowded in there at the seams with two pairs of gloves).

    I was up near Philly over the holidays and had to help my FNL snow blow his driveway. The Isotoners did not survive long, he gave me some regular thermal insulated gloves which did the trick nicely. They don’t alow much movement so I didn’t know if there was something in-between.

    Shifting isn’t a problem since I only ride single-speeds. Those semi-lobster claw gloves look interesting but maybe too thick and bulky. Like I said previously, I am trying to get a multi-use glove to use while I ride and run. Maybe I should comb over Nashbar and post some ideas for feedback. Of course, with the Reynaud’s I may be limited to a more bulky glove like I used in Philly to get the job done.

    Something along these lines...
    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...9_10000_200494

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._10000__200494

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._10000__200494

    Which I guess is a midrange glove.
    Last edited by dixie whiskey; 01-03-2011 at 01:13 PM.

  93. #493
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    Dalton, I agree with Mtbxplorer, I am on my 3rd winter with my Schwalbe's on the bike in the fall and I leave them on until the last threat of snow in May/June. They are a little noisy on asphalt or concrete, but I can live with it. I can't imagine not having them on for the evening commute even if the morning looks clear. Just make sure they are carbide studs, like with Nokian or Schwalbe. Maybe some others are carbide now too, but Peter White warns of steel which will wear away quickly.

  94. #494
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixie whiskey
    BrianMc – you nailed it. I have not been medically diagnosed but I have been dealing with it long enough to know the symptoms and how to deal with it. You pegged it too at 30°F I have tried both fingerless/finger cycling gloves underneath Isotoners with no success. Although this morning was less of fingertips numb/white and more of just painful (it was probably crowded in there at the seams with two pairs of gloves).

    I was up near Philly over the holidays and had to help my FNL snow blow his driveway. The Isotoners did not survive long, he gave me some regular thermal insulated gloves which did the trick nicely. They don’t alow much movement so I didn’t know if there was something in-between.

    Shifting isn’t a problem since I only ride single-speeds. Those semi-lobster claw gloves look interesting but maybe too thick and bulky. Like I said previously, I am trying to get a multi-use glove to use while I ride and run. Maybe I should comb over Nashbar and post some ideas for feedback. Of course, with the Reynaud’s I may be limited to a more bulky glove like I used in Philly to get the job done.

    Something along these lines...
    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...9_10000_200494

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._10000__200494

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._10000__200494

    Which I guess is a midrange glove.

    Seriously cold hands need mitts.

  95. #495
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Seriously cold hands need mitts.
    Mitts would be fine for commutes but won't work for running and off-road riding. I'm looking for a multi-use for all riding and activity.

  96. #496
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixie whiskey
    Mitts would be fine for commutes but won't work for running and off-road riding. I'm looking for a multi-use for all riding and activity.

    Yup fine for cummutes fine for running and fine for off road riding...

    Hell I can change a tire with my mitts on.

  97. #497
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton
    ..... Do you guys/gals who roll studded tires just ride them all winter snow or not? ... my local shop says "NEVER ride studs on pavement."

    Thanks!
    I'm a noob at studded snow tires on bikes (lots of experience on cars/trucks). I change the pickup's tires Nov 15 and out Apr 15, here. Ovbviously they are run for the duration, dry pavement or no.

    Peter White says on his site that they check the seating of each stud of the snows they sell so their customers do not have the "break in" to seat the studs, but can ride them as intended immediately. I got mine from him and all studs are still present with over the break-in miles on them on mixed road surfaces. Someone here reported pretty high mileages with their Swalbe studded tires, so it sounds like it is no worries on the 'wear them out fast' if they are carbide.

    Currently I am running them full time on the errand bike. On nice days with clear dry roads, if I don't need the cargo capacity (racks) I'll take the good bike and save pavement miles on the studs.

  98. #498
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton
    Do you guys/gals who roll studded tires just ride them all winter snow or not? I haven't been riding much lately and want to get back on, but its icy at best around here and we're probably going to get some more snow before the season is over. So, did you just buy the best (schwalbe, nokian...) and ride them or do you swap them out on the days there isn't any snow/very little ice?

    I need to make a tire change, so I figure you winter commuters are the best source for a good answer since my local shop says "NEVER ride studs on pavement."

    Thanks!
    From Peter White's website:
    About the studs

    The studs in all Nokian and Schwalbe tires are made of carbide, which is a very hard material. The studs are quite durable. But it is possible occasionally for a stud to come out of the tire. This is most likely to happen when riding single track on the Extreme 294, the Hakka WXC 300, the 700c Hakkapeliitta W240, or the Schwalbe Ice Spiker. On single track in winter you can get a mix of snow, ice and exposed rock. When climbing steeply or braking hard while descending, studs can occasionally tear out of the tire when you go over exposed rock. It happens rarely, and mostly it happens with heavier riders, say over 200 lbs. Losing a stud once in a while is no cause for alarm, it's normal wear and tear, and is not covered by the warrantee. With 294 studs in the Extremes for example, you'd have to lose a whole lot of them for the tires to perform poorly. And in fact, most riders will never lose a stud on the Nokians I sell. But it can happen. Just keep riding, have fun, and don't worry about it.

    And don't worry about the studs damaging your inner tubes. They won't. The tires are carefully designed to prevent the studs from puncturing the tube. The base of the stud is flat, like the head of a nail. So (to extend the analogy) the point of the nail is outside the tire to grip the ice, and the head of the nail is embedded in the tire casing. And, yes, you do need inner tubes with our studded tires. They will not work without inner tubes. And, you can just use your regular old inner tubes. You don't need special tubes for these tires. As tires age, the casing deteriorates, and then the studs can push through the casing. But it's not so much that the studs are damaging the casing, but more that the old worn out casing can't keep the studs in place.

    The studs will not make the bike skid on pavement. If they did we couldn't sell them. They only help the tires to NOT skid on ice. They have no effect on pavement, except for a chattering sound.

    Like all things, studded tires will eventually wear out. The casing may fail around a knob. Some knobs may break off. Some studs will rip out. The sidewalls will tear or shred. This happens to all tires eventually, these Nokians and Schwalbes are no different from other high quality tires. We could sell tires that would outlast your bike. But they would be too heavy and you wouldn't want to ride. So I suppose that would make them last even longer. When your tires wear out, you'll have lots of great memories of all those rides that wore out your tires. So when they wear out, don't get mad. Get another pair and go back out and ride some more.

    One thing's for sure. Your winter tires with carbide studs will outlast any other studded tires available, at least those that use steel studs.

  99. #499
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    Feel like an iceblock?

    Conditions were perfect Friday night for the start of Williamston's annual ice carving festival. Under a steady snowfall, Scott Miller of Lansing turned blocks of ice into pieces of art as bystanders looked on....He carved sculptures of a cyclist and a woman in a yoga pose...
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  100. #500
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    Looks like a Pugsley with aero bars. Did it have studded tires?

    Word has it there was one of Mtbxplorer, too, but no one could see it!

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