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  1. #1101
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    feeling like -21 C with windchill.
    touring compound tires feel dead.
    swapped over to gummier cross rubber and we'll see in the morning how she goes!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  2. #1102
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    New record cold for me today, 16 degrees and windy. The windchill was close to zero. I had 2 clothing issues. My toes were really cold by time I got to work. I had on my Lake winter shoes with Smartwool sock liners and very thick wool socks. I always have issues with cold feet, not sure what else I can do short of toe warmers. Second was my hands. My warmest bike gloves weren't warm enough at 23. I tried the Black Diamond gloves I got got climbing Mt. Washington in January a couple years ago, they were too bulky though. I used a pair of EMS mittens with Gore-tex. They were plenty warm, only issue was it was a bit difficult shifting. Maybe I should go SS for the winter.

    Might get a big winter storm on Wednesday. That should be fun! Though I won't be commuting Wed, Thurs or Fri this week. I will be mountain biking Friday but not back on the commuter until next week after tomorrow.

  3. #1103
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    ^^ I guess you could try booties over the Lakes, or a box of toe-warmers goes a long way. Pogies aka moose mitts aka bar mitts are the best thing since sliced bread for your hands.

    A low of 0F here today, but it zoomed up to 2F by the time I left. Thankfully yetserday’s buitter gusty winds stopped. I had one of those day when I know I’m putting on one too many layer but I couldn’t stop myself…sure enough I was too warm on top hallway to work. Although it can be a good feeling to pedal with your jacket zipper down, telling the world you are toasty. Pogies plus pretty warm gloves were perfect. Toes a bit chilly with the woolies plus keen insulated boots, but not bad, just noticeably cold..

  4. #1104
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    call me a wimp but it's been in the 30s and pissing down rain for days in Texas. I can handle cold, and I can take a little rain, but combining them sounds miserable and makes me glad I have a car.

  5. #1105
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    Ah, cold morning here....15 F this morning for the ride in. Just finished my Straggler build yesterday, but ended up riding my Puglsey to work due to it having Bar Mitts and I wanted to be comfy on the ride in.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  6. #1106
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    call me a wimp but it's been in the 30s and pissing down rain for days in Texas. I can handle cold, and I can take a little rain, but combining them sounds miserable and makes me glad I have a car.
    I hear ya. You need to cover like 99% of your body in rain gear to deal with cold AND wet weather. It's a new thing for me, I rode the other day when it was low 40's and raining. I had rain paints, rain coat with the hood on under my helmet and rain covers on my shoes. My gloves were soft shell and they soaked through after about 20-30 minutes, that's when I got uncomfortable and said screw this, I'm going home. Getting waterproof gloves for Christmas.

  7. #1107
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    I need some studded tires, probably 26xwhatever for my MTB, which i desperately need to go through and fix up. Any suggestions on a good studded winter tire that's not crazy expensive? I'd like to keep my eye on things through Black Friday/Cyber Monday deals to see if I can nab some on the cheap.

  8. #1108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    I need some studded tires, probably 26xwhatever for my MTB, which i desperately need to go through and fix up. Any suggestions on a good studded winter tire that's not crazy expensive? I'd like to keep my eye on things through Black Friday/Cyber Monday deals to see if I can nab some on the cheap.
    Studded Bicycle Tires

    He has the M&G for $70 bucks a pop.....the tire is a bit heavy but should last 20000 km...(Studs will outlast the rubber.)

    He also has probably the best selection.

  9. #1109
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    I just bought a pair of M&G tires for my wife's bike this morning. <$50
    Tree Fort Bikes - Online Bicycle Parts and Accessories, Bicycle Tools and Maintenance
    They are a great commuter tire. Mine are going on their 3rd season. They have enough traction to ride across a glare lake.

  10. #1110
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    Hey are the W240s worth the extra coin? $70 vs. $50 at REI.

    W160

    W240

    Edit: whoa, 700x40 W240. Is it better to switch to the wider tire MTB or stick with the 700c cross bike through the winter? The MTB has lower gearing, which is probably going to be more useful, but it also needs repairs (shifter/derailer, headset bearing) and I'd have to move my lights over. And figure out seating. I guess I'm talking myself more into is 700c workable or do i pretty much need a wider tire?

  11. #1111
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    Hi Sanath,

    For general riding the 160 stud version is great. If you have lots of icy hills to climb the higher stud count could help but in general it will hurt your rolling resistance so there is a trade off other than cost.

    Re: wider vs thinner. If you are riding on roads you want a thinner winter tire to bite down into the snow and get to solid ground/ice below. If you are riding on trails you want a fatter tire to help you float over the snow. Since roads are usually treated and slushy you never get much float on them even with fat tires.

    700c vs 26": 240 studs in a 26" tire gives you a higher stud density than 240 studs in a 700c tire.

  12. #1112
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    The nokian 1.95 tires are really narrow - more like a 1.7. A coworker has the 1.9 schwalbe snowstud and it looks gigantic compared to my m&g.

    The m&g is a great on ice and hardpack, but I find it's surprisingly crummy on fresh snow. And I don't think moving to the 240 would fix that, because it's a width problem and not a stud one. The m&g is a weird middle-ground that's too wide to reliably cut down to the ground and too narrow to give any reliable float. Everyone's winter conditions will be different, but around here it's great 95% of the time, and then it's really surprisingly terrible on some days.

    So I probably would go narrower with the 40mm, or wider with a 2.1 or a schwalbe.

  13. #1113
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Re: wider vs thinner. If you are riding on roads you want a thinner winter tire to bite down into the snow and get to solid ground/ice below. If you are riding on trails you want a fatter tire to help you float over the snow. Since roads are usually treated and slushy you never get much float on them even with fat tires.
    Too much of a simplification....sometimes you need float on the roads sometimes you need to cut down to a more consolidated layer...

    sometimes you need float on the trails...sometimes you need to cut down to a more consolidated layer.

    Just depends on the particular snow conditions of that day.

    Most often it is only possible to ride car snot with float...

    A narrower tire can be made to float by riding faster.

  14. #1114
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    The m&g is a great on ice and hardpack, but I find it's surprisingly crummy on fresh snow. And I don't think moving to the 240 would fix that, because it's a width problem and not a stud one. The m&g is a weird middle-ground that's too wide to reliably cut down to the ground and too narrow to give any reliable float. Everyone's winter conditions will be different, but around here it's great 95% of the time, and then it's really surprisingly terrible on some days.
    Float or lack of float is strongly dependant on the riders weight....so perhaps you are lighter or heavier than the rider you are making the reccomendation for....

  15. #1115
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Too much of a simplification....sometimes you need float on the roads sometimes you need to cut down to a more consolidated layer...

    sometimes you need float on the trails...sometimes you need to cut down to a more consolidated layer.

    Just depends on the particular snow conditions of that day.

    Most often it is only possible to ride car snot with float...

    A narrower tire can be made to float by riding faster.
    Well, since sanath was looking to choose a single set of tires I was giving him the fundamentals. In my experience floating on car snot in traffic on narrow tires isn't a real comfortable feeling.

    I agree with newf that sometimes the 1.9" M&G float too much but most of the time they are a great choice, especially if most of your riding is on pavement with occasional ice.

    On a related note, I just outfitted one of my trail bikes with 26" ice spiker EVOs. 361 studs baby! Not a tire I'd want to ride on the road much.

  16. #1116
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    Gads, the ride in was like ice skating. Around 4" of heavy, wet snow that just compressed to a functional equivalent of ice. Steering was a joke and I had to walk several sections.

    If it helps steer a recommendation I think I'll have to deal with whatever's left on the ungroomed/uncleared trail (heavy/wet snow or re-frozen ruts) considerably more than fresh powder or anything on-road. It sounds like the 26x1.9 M&G is about the same width as a 700x40 though. I think I've essentially made up my mind to get the 700x40 tires and not deal with outfitting a second bike right now, unless anyone can come up with any reason I might not want to do that.

  17. #1117
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    Well to further complicate things, if what you're dealing with is frozen ruts the problem with narrow tires is that they can easily get eaten by the various gaps and spaces.

    My main tires are 29x2.25 icespikerpros. The big volume means I can run around 20psi, and they conform to stuff rather than bouncing off. They can get me through anything, and the bike with the m&gs only gets used when road conditions are pretty settled.

    I mention this every winter, but the manufacturers have gone crazy with stud count when for most applications I don't think it actually adds much. I think a big volume knobby with 2 rows of studs (instead of 5) would be a more reliable commuter tire than what's actually out there.

  18. #1118
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    Well they're not so much ruts (as from a bike tire) as they are... bumps (as from a footprint). I'd love to have a 29er or fatbike as an option but I've got to just run the bikes available, which are a 26" MTB and a 700c cross bike.

    edit: good jesus **** those ice spikers are expensive.

  19. #1119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    edit: good jesus **** those ice spikers are expensive.
    Their msrp is indeed ridiculous. I got mine for $100/tire, which was okay. This is winter #3, and they don't look brandnew anymore, but they should have plenty of life left.

    As for the frozen footprints, I did 2 winters on my m&gs. They worked pretty well, but I had to accept that some days would not be good days.

  20. #1120
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    No love for Hakkapelliittas? I picked up a used set last year from a craigslist seller who moved to a 700c steed. I'm eager to try them out, but last winter gave me no opportunity, and the conditions have yet to warrant it here this year.
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  21. #1121
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Well to further complicate things, if what you're dealing with is frozen ruts the problem with narrow tires is that they can easily get eaten by the various gaps and spaces.

    My main tires are 29x2.25 icespikerpros. The big volume means I can run around 20psi, and they conform to stuff rather than bouncing off. They can get me through anything, and the bike with the m&gs only gets used when road conditions are pretty settled.

    I mention this every winter, but the manufacturers have gone crazy with stud count when for most applications I don't think it actually adds much. I think a big volume knobby with 2 rows of studs (instead of 5) would be a more reliable commuter tire than what's actually out there.
    Good points

    My Freddie Revenz 2.35 x 26 ...are absolutly excellent with ruts etc...

    they actually weigh less than the M&G cause they have aluminum body/carbide tip studs...

    But the are pigs for rolling resistance...

    But you get alot more float through the car snot where you really want to cut through if you can...but if the M&G dont cut through the Freddies are better...

    Anyway it is all about conditions...and I have never made it through the whole year picking the right tire...

  22. #1122
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    I just bought a pair of M&G tires for my wife's bike this morning. <$50
    Tree Fort Bikes - Online Bicycle Parts and Accessories, Bicycle Tools and Maintenance
    They are a great commuter tire. Mine are going on their 3rd season. They have enough traction to ride across a glare lake.
    Ditto on Treefort M&G, I got them recommended by my brother. Supposed to easily last several seasons. Not the best tire, but hard to beat for the price. They have been working great for me so far.

  23. #1123
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    goddayumnstoopidfrigging...

    Punctured tube other day on my studded tire, when I went to try and replace the tube all of a sudden the tire's sliding off the rim at anywhere near proper psi.
    After wasting about an hour of pumping, deflating, re-inflating, etc I throw the stupid tire into the corner and swap in a marathon xr.
    don't like rocking one stud tire and one not but you do what you can.
    Rode it around today and the traction differences from front to back are WEIRD!

    Stting at home and now that the wife's bike is sitting inside for awhile the air in the tire heats up and sure enough... rear tire slips off the rim and the tube pulls an "alien" out the side.

    I don't know WTMFF is going on with these snow stud tires but I'm sure as hell not grabbing another set.
    FWIW My marathon winters have been fine. Never had a prob like this with them.
    KILLING my winter stoke here...
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  24. #1124
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    After being a 3 season commuter, I'm dabbling in the waters of year round commuting. I've waited till the roads are clear, figure get used to the cold before I add in snow and ice. It's a unique experience.

    Anyone have a recommendation on brake pads? The ones that came on my trek felt like hard plastic when its in the 20s-30s. Braking power definitely suffered, think I need a softer rubber that'll handle cold better.

  25. #1125
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post
    goddayumnstoopidfrigging...
    Wow, that`s a weird one for sure. I can`t picture what you describe, though. You mean the tire lets the tube squirt out between the bead and the edge of the rim somehow, or it just slips around and tries to snap the valve stem? Either way, about the only suggestion I could offer would be to switch your prayer to something like "hijodelachingadaquelepario..."
    Worth a try.

    Hey, KentheKona! Nice plan figuring out what you need for dry cold before dealing with the ice. Salmon Coolstops seem to get about 9 out of every 10 brake pad suggestions. I do use them (might as well), but honestly I don`t see much difference between any pads except the ones that are a decade old and cracked.
    Recalculating....

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