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  1. #76
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    commute all year

    have for the last 5
    then again I live in san diego, where I may have to bust out some knickers and arm warmers once in awhile

    much respek fer my frozen brethren!

    fux, wussup with that book/cd shelf?????

  2. #77
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    We finally got some snow, about 4 inches laying around here in Anchorage, the commute has been fun so far! Waiting for more paths to be cleared is the hard part. ;p Temps in the teens to low twenties.

  3. #78
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    This is my first year commuting by bike. I started back in March/April when gas prices spiked over $4.00 a gallon. At first I figured that I'd ride through the summer and start driving again at the first sign of fall, but here it is the middle of November and I'm still going strong. However, I think that I've finally identified my “Too cold to ride” point. I plan on continue riding as long as the daily low temperature isn't forecasted to be below 30F. So far the temperature has remained above my riding threshold, but it looks like my dedication to cycling will be tested by the upcoming temperatures (Friday’s low is forecasted at 22F). Regardless of whether I make it through the entire winter or not, I've already gone way further into the year than I thought I would have.

  4. #79
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    It was 6F w/ ice fog yesterday AM on the commute into work. About 16F on the way home this evening. I drove to work tonight for maintenance and it was 3F. Should be a cold afternoon commute for sure tomorrow. Still not getting cold yet, but I have a feeling that 0f will be a starting point on when to add more clothing.

  5. #80
    oh crap...
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    Keep on going!

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon76
    This is my first year commuting by bike. I started back in March/April when gas prices spiked over $4.00 a gallon. At first I figured that I'd ride through the summer and start driving again at the first sign of fall, but here it is the middle of November and I'm still going strong. However, I think that I've finally identified my “Too cold to ride” point. I plan on continue riding as long as the daily low temperature isn't forecasted to be below 30F. So far the temperature has remained above my riding threshold, but it looks like my dedication to cycling will be tested by the upcoming temperatures (Friday’s low is forecasted at 22F). Regardless of whether I make it through the entire winter or not, I've already gone way further into the year than I thought I would have.

    I think you'll find that a little experimenting with clothing, especially gloves, will allow you to ride nearly every day of the year. Snow and ice is another matter, but keep on going!!!!!
    Grow some food for yourself.

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmerfrederico
    I think you'll find that a little experimenting with clothing, especially gloves, will allow you to ride nearly every day of the year. Snow and ice is another matter, but keep on going!!!!!
    I think I'm going to take it a day at a time once the temperature drops below freezing. I did buy some waterproof winter boots today in preparation for the cold weather. Dang you guys and your words of motivation.

  7. #82
    fux
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    fux, wussup with that book/cd shelf?????
    Its design, apparently.

    http://www.retrotogo.com/2006/04/high_street_boo.html

    As for tires, I fit my On-one with schwalbe marathon winter 700x42 and it flies. Works well on the icey patches and frozen gravel. No snow yet though.

    Funny thing is I sold my On-one and have just bought me a salsa la-cruz, I`ve only had the inbred a month but a friend wanted it so bad after he saw it and bought it on the spot!
    Disclaimer. I now sell bicycles and bicycle tyres.

    instacrap ----> http://instagram.com/manx71/

  8. #83
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    Any little known tips for a newbie to the commuting scene? i have already been scared back into my car since i work night shift it is colder then. anything helps. thanks

  9. #84
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    I'm going to start doing it as soon as I get some appropriate attire. My commute is only 2.5 miles.
    2002 Schwinn Aluminum Comp. Beater.
    2009 Gary Fisher Utopia - Commuter.
    2009 Trek 1.2.

  10. #85
    Which way? Uphill.
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    Well, the winter has finally arrived in Colorado, dang we had a good run of warm weather this year. High of 77 two days ago and low 20's with freezing drizzle this morning.

    That said, I absolutely love my new GoLite Aero jacket, it was built for this weather. I tried it previously on a ~30°F dry morning and it was too warm, but it was perfect today.

    The last two miles saw my rear derrailleur freeze and both of my brakes freeze, good thing it's an uphill finish.

    Lots of crazy looks from coworkers when I came into work with 1/8" of ice over my entire body, but I was still warm. My glasses were pretty useless though with all the ice on them.
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  11. #86
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    I've been commuting for about 25 years. Hope this helps. . .

    Fenders and packs mounted to a rack, backpacks are for junior high kids

    Gore tex shell and rain pants.

    Stay off ice but if you need to find yourself there, get studs.

    WOOL. . . theres no substitute

    Big cheapo fatass snowboard gloves beat cycling gloves for warmth, price and durability

    plastic bags over shoes under neoprene toe warmers for feet. Wet feet suck!

    multiple red flashers and a good headlight you can rely on.

    Stay warm and safe

  12. #87
    One Colorful Rider
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    As I rode home tonight the snow flurries became heavy. With my Hope HID light I was getting put in the hypnotic state. It was pretty Trippy.

  13. #88
    bicycle dreamer
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    Just got my Craft balaclava, storm tights & gloves in today. Tomorrow ... Pearl Izumi barrier gtx boots.

    Layers layers layers ... the cold doesn't bother me as much as the wind. Anything but a tailwind absolutely sucks.
    Moving the soul with two wheels.
    I have a slight cycling addiction.

    Now living in Nagoya City, Japan!

  14. #89
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by That Geo Guy
    Layers layers layers ... the cold doesn't bother me as much as the wind. Anything but a tailwind absolutely sucks.
    A good softshell jacket and rain pants, and the wind isn't cold anymore. Still sucks, but it isn't cold.

    I had my first frozen goatee of the season this morning. It was 20-something. Almost time to bust out the 'clava...

    Does anyone else hold out on their warmest layers so that when it gets REALLY cold they will have something else to put on? I play this mental game. I'm still wearing shorts and my pearl izumi leg warmers under my rain/wind pants....and my sub-zero tights are waiting on a shelf for that day when the cold starts to intimidate me. I haven't busted out the neoprene socks yet either. They are my next line of defense.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #90
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    I got my first taste of riding with snow on the ground on my way home from work today. What I realized is that I seriously doubt that I'm going to be able to ride on days when there are ice or snow on the ground. Below is the elevation profile of my commute.


    I figured out today that regardless of how good my tires and brakes are, snow coverd/icy steep hills can be dangerous. I haven't given up for the winter, but I will be driving on days there are a chance of snow or ice being on the ground.

  16. #91
    snackPACK
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    if there's lots of snow one could cross train and cross country ski to work

  17. #92
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalitup
    backpacks are for junior high kids

    This is the only part of your post that I totally disagree with. I've always preferred carrying things on my person rather than lashed, strapped, or clamped on to the bike. I cringe when I have to put the fenders on for the winter, but they're so functional, I deal with it. This is a total personal preference issue. I think a backpack keeps me a bit warmer in the sub-zero mornings too.

    Maybe if I wore my work clothes on the bike I'd have a different opinion, I don't know. I change at work and wear full-on bike gear and a backpack with the essentials for the commute. I don't even put a seat pouch on my bikes.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  18. #93
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    I did the same

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    This is the only part of your post that I totally disagree with. I've always preferred carrying things on my person rather than lashed, strapped, or clamped on to the bike. I cringe when I have to put the fenders on for the winter, but they're so functional, I deal with it. This is a total personal preference issue. I think a backpack keeps me a bit warmer in the sub-zero mornings too.

    Maybe if I wore my work clothes on the bike I'd have a different opinion, I don't know. I change at work and wear full-on bike gear and a backpack with the essentials for the commute. I don't even put a seat pouch on my bikes.
    and at the time I designed clothing and accessories
    I designed a back pack with:
    easy access cell phone pouch
    internal i-pod/MP3/CD player holder with ear buds through the shoulder straps
    wet/dry pouch that held a 6 Pack of canned beer

    definitely better than panniers

  19. #94
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    eh, commuting in harsh Wisconsin winters is the same to me as commuting in good weather. Just use layers, the right gear, studded tires if you have to ride on ice, and you're set.
    Last year I hit a milbox with my face for slipping on ice in the dark commute to work. Broke my glasses and helmet. But I still rode.
    Today, cold and windy...and about to leave. Later fools.

  20. #95
    snackPACK
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    thats because people from Wisconsin are immune to hell freezing over
    "sure I'll hit it... ooh... whats happening over there?" --ADD rider

  21. #96
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by ernesto_from_Wisconsin
    eh, commuting in harsh Wisconsin winters is the same to me as commuting in good weather. Just use layers, the right gear, studded tires if you have to ride on ice, and you're set.
    Last year I hit a milbox with my face for slipping on ice in the dark commute to work. Broke my glasses and helmet. But I still rode.
    Today, cold and windy...and about to leave. Later fools.

    Wait...you hit a mailbox with your face, and we're the fools?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  22. #97
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    I currently am switching commuters. I'm migrating over from my old 1989 Fisher AL-1 to a Trek 4900 that I picked up off Craigslist. However, I'm not terribly thrilled with the Trek yet. I do like the fact that the ride is more plush than the Fisher but it just has a different feel. I'm not sure I like it.

    So, I've been thinking of buying a second set of wheels to put on my dirt bike - Trek 8000 - to make it into a road bike. This would also require putting a rack on it but I think with the units available at oldmanmountain.com I could come up with a pretty sweet quick conversion.

    However, I was wondering just how much damage my dirt bike would take being used as a commuter. My current commuter has a full coverage rear fender which keeps my chain pretty clean but I wouldn't be able to do that on the dirt bike.

    What do you think? Should I keep 2 dedicated bikes or try to make a dual-duty machine?

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    This is the only part of your post that I totally disagree with. I've always preferred carrying things on my person rather than lashed, strapped, or clamped on to the bike. I cringe when I have to put the fenders on for the winter, but they're so functional, I deal with it. This is a total personal preference issue. I think a backpack keeps me a bit warmer in the sub-zero mornings too.

    Maybe if I wore my work clothes on the bike I'd have a different opinion, I don't know. I change at work and wear full-on bike gear and a backpack with the essentials for the commute. I don't even put a seat pouch on my bikes.
    Hrm...I hate riding with a backpack. I have a rack and panniers so I can carry a thermos of coffee, clothes, tools, spare tube and other junk. It's just so easy to use the Ortlieb bags...they drop on and off with ease and they are completely waterproof. I also hang my lock on my rear rack...much more secure than the clamp it came with.

    I do miss having a light bike...my frame and wheels are very light but throwing 20 pounds on it does take the life out of it.

  24. #99
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    It's was about -15 celsius with a couple inches of snow here last week but still riding in shorts with a cheap pair of tights, long sleeve jersey sweatshirt and soft shell. I was forced to break out the balaclava for a couple days though. I heldout on installing the studded tires until last weekend. We had freezing rain one morning and I slid about 20 feet on my ass while holding my bike up in the air. No road rash when it's icy at least!

  25. #100
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    I think the best commuter bikes would be like your basic bike that doesnt have any valuable components or quick releases. that way nobody steals stuff off of it while it is locked up. a friend of mine commutes on a bike made entirely by dumpster diving. thats the key... no money invested.
    "sure I'll hit it... ooh... whats happening over there?" --ADD rider

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