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  1. #626
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    from BikeRadar.com
    Continental TopContact Winter 2 tire
    Here's another review of the same tyres:

    Review: Continental TopContact Winter II tires

    "Where They'll Work

    Traction on slippery surfaces is drastically increased over a regular touring-type tire, matching or even exceeding a cyclocross tire in certain conditions. The Winter II handles short sections of ice, even nasty black ice, much better than any ícross tire Iíve used, though a studded tire still inspires far more confidence.

    With less than four inches or so of snow on the ground, the Winter IIs cut through and use their contact surface area and soft compound to provide excellent grip.

    Where they wonít

    Deep snow is a no-go. The lack of side knobs makes tracking or turning impossible if the tires canít reach down to a hard surface. The good news is that it doesnít really matter what that hard surface is: Ice or pavement, the Winter IIs grab hold. The 37c versions I used were narrow; they could almost always get down and bite onto something during our last five-inch storm. Any more snow and theyíd be in trouble, though.

    Though the Winter IIs roll admirably fast when itís cold, the soft rubber gets even softer and slower when it gets warm. The hundreds of little siping bits squirm around on warm pavement, sending rolling resistance through the roof. It might be worth swapping them out if a week of 60-degree highs is forecast.

    That same soft rubber picks up gravel and other spikey bits more than any tire Iíve ever used. I havenít had any flats yet, but I have picked a few chunks of glass out of the tire that the PolyX breaker stopped."
    Velonews.com

  2. #627
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    Tubeless DIY Studs Update #2

    We got some snow over the weekend, so I've put the studded tires back on the bike and will be commuting with them this week. I added contact cement and superglue to hopefully keep the studs from backing into the tires, but I also cheated and used a liner/tube for the rear tire. My tubeless experiment continues, but only on the front.

  3. #628
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    How'd they do with our arrival of winter here, Newfangled? I'm still watching this thread as I might be attempting a similar conversion on my Ignitors and actually get out there this winter on the trails!

    I'm not sure that the studded tire would help on the trails, but it'll give me something to do on my old, unused tires.

  4. #629
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    ^ So far, so good. If you want to use a tire liner and tube I'd say that they're fine, because Edmonton Bicycle Commuters and Icebike have been recommending that approach for years.

    For the tubeless version the jury is still out, and it will be for awhile. After a whopping 2 1/2 days the tubeless front tire looks fine, but I have no idea how long it will last. And I went with the front tire because it typically has less load than the rear, so I basically chickened out. I would say that some sort of adhesive is definitely required. I mostly used contact cement because I had a whole tube of it lying around, and because it's flexible if not that strong, where something like super glue is stronger but brittle. Looking online it seems that goop, gorilla glue, or maybe even jbweld might have been better ideas? I'll see how it goes.

    Studs generally aren't needed on our midwinter hardpacked trails, but I remember a few times last year when it was completely impossible to walk up this hill - dogwalkers were giving up and turning around, but I could just cruise up with my studs. They're also handy on all the MUP transitions which can get pretty glazed, or when we get freeze/thaw cycles that turn everything to ice. They're good for inspiring confidence (and occasional over-confidence, but if you do fall the ground is nice and soft).

  5. #630
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    So far, so good.
    If you`ve got more than 8KM on the front now, you`re making progress. I`ve never messed with tubeless, but I`m guessing that unmounting the tire to see how they`re doing from the inside isn`t a quick and easy job?

  6. #631
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    ^ "messed with tubeless" is a good way to put it.

    It's not too bad, but in the last few weeks I've done 6 tubeless setups, and 2 were somewhat painful. The worst part is that you can intend to spend 15 minutes working on the bike - you just mounted this tire on this rim last week with zero problems - but it becomes an hour-and-a-half because one stupid bead just will not seat. Compare that to a tube where you always know how long it will take you.

    But the benefit of tubeless is that once the setup is done you're good, and you'd never really have to take the tires off again until they wear out. I carry a little bottle of spare sealant with me, and if I ever do get a leak that won't seal I can just inject it in, air up the tire, and be on my way. But I think swapping tires back and forth without a compressor is bound to lead to at least some frustration.

    That being said, I'm definitely paying careful attention to the stud depth, and may open up the tire to take a look after a month or so. You can open the bead on one side without having to worry too much about getting it back on - it's when you remove the whole tire that all bets are off.

  7. #632
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Tubeless DIY Studs Update #2

    We got some snow over the weekend, so I've put the studded tires back on the bike and will be commuting with them this week. I added contact cement and superglue to hopefully keep the studs from backing into the tires, but I also cheated and used a liner/tube for the rear tire. My tubeless experiment continues, but only on the front.
    In my DIY studded (using car tire studs) I always used Mr Tuffy tire liners, sometimes with the snakeskin ones also, and I have tried glued in old tubes too (using PVC cement). They all worked for a while, but eventually something would shift enough for the back of one stud to start rubbing on the air-holding tube, and eventually it would flat. I developed a low tolerance for flats in the middle of winter, and opted for the manufactured studded tires. My DIY's gripped just as well, and had that DIY cachet, but had a higher risk of flats and were heavier.

  8. #633
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    Still running the M&G Nokian....close to 10,000 km....ran tubeless for the first 3 years, now the tire is too porous, so I run tubes....studs are fine, the rubber is wearing out....studs stick out a little too far.

    Depending upon snow conditions, usually here you want to dig down, they are fine...but if you want float they don't.

    Think I paid about $120 for them...so that is $0.012/km...I'll get another 2000 km this winter on them.

  9. #634
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    mtbxplorer, I only went DIY because there aren't many commercial studded 29er tires. And the whole tubeless experiment is because flats in winter totally suck. But once the new schwalbe ice spiker pro 29ers come down in price a bit I'll probably get some.

  10. #635
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    I just lost an ebay auction for some used 700x40 Nokians... they launched up to basically MSRP just before the auction closed. I'm tempted to just bite the bullet, since I have a spare wheelset and I could probably get several years out of them by swapping them onto the bike only when conditions warranted it.
    But geesh, paying as much for a bike tire as you'd pay for a car tire is pretty brutal.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  11. #636
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    But geesh, paying as much for a bike tire as you'd pay for a car tire is pretty brutal.
    245-18 55R Dunlop Hydrophilic Snow Tire for the big car: $250. The Goodyear F1s for the summer are closer to $300 each. My Nokian A10s: $54 each. Solution is to buy high quality tires for the car!

  12. #637
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    Yeah... I have 33"s on my Jeep, and they are pricy. But the 29er nokians are over $100 each! That hurts for just a few days of use each year. Might just save the money for new Jeep tires and enjoy my driving days.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  13. #638
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    ^ and the reviews for those 29er nokians are all "It's okay...I guess. But the 26er version is sooooo much better." All that for ~$250 shipped!

  14. #639
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    Maybe the Schwalbe700x38 snow stud (don't you want to be one?) for $55?
    Schwalbe Snow Stud 700c) at BikeTiresDirect
    A couple good reviews.

  15. #640
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    Winter's here! 6" when I left. Very little traffic because of the storm and the holiday. Challenging, but totally pedal-able.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-pb231344.jpg  


  16. #641
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    Yikes, look at all the snow.

    I'm waiting till it warms up to 70 today before I go biking. :-p

  17. #642
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    Whoohoo- It looks pretty! No shovelling?

  18. #643
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Winter's here! 6" when I left. Very little traffic because of the storm and the holiday. Challenging, but totally pedal-able.
    Ah! Beautiful!
    2012 Cannondale Trail SL 29ER 4

    1994 Cannondale Super V 1000

    1996 Cannondale F500 rigid-fork 69'er

    Motiv 26'er

  19. #644
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    ^^ I'm hoping to roll down my driveway in my car tomorrow to Thanksgiving festivities without touching a shovel or snowblower. Supposed to warm up to the 40's Friday-Sunday. Hope I don't get stuck! This morning I added gaiters over the bike pant/shoes to get down to the road without getting wet.

  20. #645
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    Magic ride home....Chinook wind at the airport was blowing 45 km/h to 65 km/h...Temp 10 C

    I though I would fight the wind all the way home...

    Magically I encountered almost no wind....you could here the aeolian tones from the wind whipping around the office towers, but no wind for me.....magic.

  21. #646
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    Studded tire news:

    Unpacked the Schwalbe IS 2.4 EVOs that have been in their boxes since I bought them in April.

    They were labelled as Tubeless-Ready, so I popped them onto my tubeless Shimano wheelset and aired them up.

    Tubeless.
    On the first try.
    With a floor pump.
    Without soap, sealant, or anything.

    They've lost no measurable pressure since Sunday. Suffice to say, as a late adapter, I'm impressed with this technology. They were no harder to get on and off the rims then anything else I've used and would make for ridiculously fast tire swaps (if needed).

  22. #647
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    The mobile office yesterday, had to stop and take a 1.5 hour conf call during my ride to work. We got a couple of inches of snow and it was about 5 degrees.


  23. #648
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    ^^Yikes! Too bad everyone on the call didn't step out where it was 5 degrees, probably could've gotten done in 20 minutes. Nice office, though.

  24. #649
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    Aw, jeeze! Was that 90 minute call totally out of the blue, or you knew it was comming and you didn`t care, rode at that time despite of it? Hope you had "tater juice" or some other kind of antifreeze in that water bottle.

  25. #650
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    Tubeless DIY Studs Update - after 2 weeks:

    As mentioned above, before mounting them again I gooped up the screws with contact cement:


    Front tire - still tubeless, and still in great shape


    Rear tire - tireliner & tube, but screws are noticeably more worn than on the front


    Its tough to tell from the photos (even if you click through to the big version), but on the rear tire a few of the screws are almost completely worn down. Other DIY approaches recommend studding the outside knob instead of the middle knob that I used, and for the rear tire that might be a good idea.

    The plus side is that even as these screws wear down they don't dull, because their cross-section has a lot of bite.


    And after a few days of -20C, and then a few more at around freezing:

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