Page 11 of 13 FirstFirst ... 78910111213 LastLast
Results 1,001 to 1,100 of 1272
  1. #1001
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,443
    Spotted my first frost of the year this morning on a few rooftops along my route. Might have to break out the leg warmers tomorrow...the shorts weren't cutting it.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  2. #1002
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Does your post officially kick off this thread for the 2013-14 season?

  3. #1003
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    ^^ No, frost means fall, not winter!

  4. #1004
    Natural Born Killer
    Reputation: nemhed's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    370
    Maybe someone has to have a below freezing temp commute to officially kick it off.
    Quote Originally Posted by Skrufryder View Post
    Silly rabbit Jack Daniel drinking donkey kissing caterpiller

  5. #1005
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    ^^ No, frost means fall, not winter!
    Okay. Got it. Frost means winter in Las Vegas.

  6. #1006
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Schott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    586
    Quote Originally Posted by vegascruiser View Post
    Okay. Got it. Frost means winter in Las Vegas.
    Lol, both days of it. Yeah, frosty mornings, snow and ice in the mountains above, it's coming for sure. I hope I get this job I'm vying for so I can commute again, 55 miles doesn't lend itself to a winter commute in a car, much less a bike!


    "You're like a Ferrari engine driving a dump truck"

  7. #1007
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Good luck on the job. . .

  8. #1008
    beautiful jackass
    Reputation: one incredible donkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    623
    Any advice for a three mile commute in the winter, with lows in the 20's? I have a light windbreaker I use for winter mountain biking but I wear it with base layers when I ride off road, and the cardio is much more intense than I'd get on the road for three miles.

    I don't want to layer too much since the ride is so short.

    I was looking at this Louis Garneau Electra jacket, which would be worn over an undershirt and button-up shirt.

    Any thoughts? Should I just go with the warmest style jacket I can find, since I won't have much of an opportunity to warm up during three miles?

  9. #1009
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    I'd say the windbreaker you've got should be fine. My commute is only 4mi, and I wear a longsleeve baselayer with a thin windbreaker down to about 0F. Colder than that and I add a fleece, but if I add layers earlier I'd be sweating like crazy.

    If you do want a heavier jacket, I wouldn't go with the Louis Garneau Electra. It has zip-off arms which I guess could be handy, but it doesn't have armpit zips. Nothing beats pit-zips for temperature control.

  10. #1010
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Everybody is different, but I`d suggest wearing something with long sleeves under the windbreaker the first day to see how it goes. You can always unzip or remove the windbreaker if you start sweating. After you get a few rides in at various temps, you`ll be better able to guess what you need and adjust from there. Get a bike jacket if you want, but it isn`t a necessity.

    My commute is just over three miles, currently in the mid 20s for my ride home at about midnight. I`m pretty happy with a windproof shell over my S/S shirt (pit zips closed at night and wide open in the afternoon). I also carry medium gloves, light balaclava, and long johns in my bag when I go in and wear it all on the ride home. I switch from shades to clear glasses, too.

    Good luck.
    Recalculating....

  11. #1011
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    I switch from a windbreaker type jacket to a softshell when it's below freezing. The softshells seem to have a wider comfort range than other jackets, without allowing sweat to build up. I find that waterproof jackets need the pitzips to avoid sweating to death, but softshells don't. I opt for something bright and on clearance.

    Wow, Rodar, didn't know you were seeing 20's already! Maybe 3 frosts here, but a mild fall so far.

  12. #1012
    beautiful jackass
    Reputation: one incredible donkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    623
    Cool, thanks for the advice. I decided to spend the money instead on a nice little light system (Light & Motion Vis 360). I'll wear my windbreaker and I think it'll be fine for my little commute.

  13. #1013
    Natural Born Killer
    Reputation: nemhed's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    370
    29 degrees this morning and very frosty, so I'm considering this the start of my long cold winter. In reality, we'll still have lots of nice days before true winter. November is typically nicer than March and April around here.
    Quote Originally Posted by Skrufryder View Post
    Silly rabbit Jack Daniel drinking donkey kissing caterpiller

  14. #1014
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WiTrailRunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    191
    I had a miserable suffer fest on my ride home last night in 36 degrees plus a headwind the whole way. I needed an extra layer everywhere. Now this morning is 27 degrees and while I can add extra layers elsewhere, my worst issue is my feet.

    Currently I'm riding flats with a pair of Gore-tex Merrells and thick wool socks, but that's not warm enough. I've tried the whole wrap your foot in a bag before putting on your shoes thing and didn't think that really helped. So what the heck do you do to keep your feet warm in the 20s and 30s? My ride isn't short, so I'm not willing to just tough it out. Nor do I want to sink a whole bunch of money into buying something that I'll only use for another month or so. I'm not hardcore enough to keep this going once it snows. Easy solutions? Suck it up and pay a bunch of money for a pair of boots?

  15. #1015
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    ^^ A Goodwill, a pair of one size too big boots from there, and extra pairs of (wool if you aren't allergic to them) socks?

    32 and frost this morning. Snow in forecast tonight. Hope this is "Squaw Winter" and we get and "Indian Summer" next week.

  16. #1016
    CB of the East
    Reputation: bedwards1000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    Hey WiTrail, if you are running flats you should be able to come up with some boots that can keep your feet warm (both on and off the bike) I use hiking boots and 2 pair of socks on one of my winter bikes and that takes me down well below zero. For really cold days I wear Hermon Survivors and 2 pair of socks. I still haven't found a pair of cycling shoes that are comfortable below zero though.

  17. #1017
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    WiTrail, a few more ideas for the feet:
    -Make sure your boots are not tied too tight, or socks so thick they make them tight.
    -An extra (or thicker, or more windproof) layer on your legs will make the blood getting to your feet warmer, and make a considerable difference.
    - Buy a few toe or handwarmer packets for extra cold days. The handwarmer ones are bulkier but cheaper and work in shoes if you have enough room. Even one by your ankle will keep your toes warm.
    - If you have any warmer boots, like thinsulate ones, try those.

  18. #1018
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WiTrailRunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    191
    Thanks for the ideas! I could wear my snowboarding boots, but that might look pretty silly. Of course, I would be warm. I should go check out Goodwill -- that's a great idea.

    We're stuck in the 20s all this week in the mornings, so I either need to suck it up or drive the car. Or wear my snowboarding boots. Hmmmm.

  19. #1019
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    384
    Your feet will be hotter than you expect in your snowboarding boots, I'd wager. How cold are your feet? I rode in Merrels (sonic glove) and wool socks into the 20s last fall and found my feet getting decidedly chilly after about 20-30 minutes of riding. If your experience is similar you could try stuffing a hot-pack into your socks so it sits against the ankle, hopefully providing just enough to tip the balance to keep your feet from getting too cold. You don't want to overheat your feet so they get sweaty, that's a sure way to make them cold the instant you stop exerting yourself (even if you're just stopping for a light).

    edit: you say you needed an extra layer everywhere. You might try making a change to keep your legs warm enough (extra pair of pants?) and see if your feet follow.

  20. #1020
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    My solution is big, cheap shoes (2 sizes too big, and $40 from an outlet) and lots of socks (up to 3 layers if it's -15F or colder).

    mtbxplorer mentioned a thicker layer on your legs, which is really important. What I also find works surprisingly well is arm/leg warmers. I have old pairs of wool socks that are worn out - I cut holes in the toes, and then slip them on my shins and forearms. With them on, it's almost like adding an extra layer of gloves or socks.

    Also, insulated insoles are handy:


  21. #1021
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WiTrailRunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    191
    I have Raynaud's Disease, so managing my hands/feet gets difficult, especially since my ride to work takes me over an hour. I'll be perfectly fine for the first 30 minutes and then it starts to get bad and I become miserable. Maybe the too-big-shoes is the way to go. I buy those little hand hot packs in bulk, otherwise I never make it through the winter. I don't currently own any shoes that have room to stuff them in though.

  22. #1022
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    So I guess we're really back on this thread again. My how quickly the other seasons flew by. . .

  23. #1023
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Agree with the suggestion to keep it loose, whatever kind of footwear you use. I`ve found that I need to keep my shoes or boots a lot looser when riding than I do off the bike. Besides cold, lacing up too tightly gives me foot pain much sooner than lose.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Wow, Rodar, didn't know you were seeing 20's already! Maybe 3 frosts here, but a mild fall so far.
    It was in the 20, but back up to around freezing lately. Delightful sunny afternoons!
    Recalculating....

  24. #1024
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    539
    30F out this morning when I left, and pitch black. We had a few snow flurries around noon. The winter has begun!

    I'm about half done upgrading my winter kit to a new year's configuration. I'll post some pictures in a couple weeks when I get it all together. For now, I'll just note that it's shaping up to be a great winter's commute.

  25. #1025
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    539
    Quote Originally Posted by one incredible donkey View Post
    Any advice for a three mile commute in the winter, with lows in the 20's? I have a light windbreaker I use for winter mountain biking but I wear it with base layers when I ride off road, and the cardio is much more intense than I'd get on the road for three miles.
    Last winter I had nothing but a wool jersey as a base layer, a thick wool sweater and a thin reflective jacket. It actually worked surprisingly well, even down below 20F. I'm considering a new jacket this year, but that's more to deal with the possibility of rain than the cold.

  26. #1026
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    17
    My downtown Montreal commute is only 4km and 90% on plowed separated bike paths. Which is why I really look forward to the winter riding. Although one thing surprises me every season: there are very few winter cyclists here despite the general popularity of cycling and all the infrastructure...



  27. #1027
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    Welcome, uberpower.

    I'd always wondered if Montreal cleared it's separated bike lanes. I'm from Edmonton, and our multi-use paths are nicely cleared all year, but our unseparated bikelanes become nightmarish skating rinks of death.

  28. #1028
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Straz85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,348
    Quote Originally Posted by WiTrailRunner View Post
    Thanks for the ideas! I could wear my snowboarding boots, but that might look pretty silly. Of course, I would be warm. I should go check out Goodwill -- that's a great idea.

    We're stuck in the 20s all this week in the mornings, so I either need to suck it up or drive the car. Or wear my snowboarding boots. Hmmmm.
    For many people, keeping your core warm is the secret to keeping your extremities warm. My hands and feet are always cold until my core gets warm, then my hands and feet follow shortly. I would recommend some winter boots. Check out REI if there's one near you, they usually have a pretty good rack of sale footwear.

  29. #1029
    CB of the East
    Reputation: bedwards1000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    24 degrees here this morning, it's coming.

  30. #1030
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    ^^Yep...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-p1020892.jpg  


  31. #1031
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Welcome, uberpower.

    I'd always wondered if Montreal cleared it's separated bike lanes. I'm from Edmonton, and our multi-use paths are nicely cleared all year, but our unseparated bikelanes become nightmarish skating rinks of death.
    The main East-West and North-South separated bike routes are usually cleared same-day and salted so much that they become completely white with salt. My favorite part, though, is cutting through a few inches of fresh powder while going back home in the evening.
    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread-cropped-cropped-1-dscn0248.jpg

  32. #1032
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Cool pictures, Xplorer and Uberpower!
    Recalculating....

  33. #1033
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    Quote Originally Posted by uberpower View Post
    The main East-West and North-South separated bike routes are usually cleared same-day and salted so much that they become completely white with salt. My favorite part, though, is cutting through a few inches of fresh powder while going back home in the evening.
    Powder is great, but cars ruin things. That's where our unseparated bike lanes become nightmarish - if a single car has crossed over into the bike lane then their tracks leave ruts, and then freeze, and then suck.

  34. #1034
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    It's coming.


  35. #1035
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spatialized's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    172
    Enjoying an Indian-ish Summer right now. Have had some mornings into the mid to high 20s, but nothing too serious. Haven't even lit the furnace yet as its been warming up during the day, talking 30-40 degree changes. But yes, it's coming.

  36. #1036
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    I'm starting to seriously think about winter and winter riding. Last year, I believe, we got our first big snow storm of the year on Halloween. The year before that we had snow as well. No snow this year, yet. But it's coming. It is coming.

    As a primer for the winter I've created a list of my winter riding clothing for a variety of temp ranges. That can be viewed here. It's funny how every year I seem to try to relearn everything I learned the year before instead of recording what worked and sticking with it.

  37. #1037
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,071
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    I'm starting to seriously think about winter and winter riding. Last year, I believe, we got our first big snow storm of the year on Halloween. The year before that we had snow as well. No snow this year, yet. But it's coming. It is coming.

    As a primer for the winter I've created a list of my winter riding clothing for a variety of temp ranges. That can be viewed here. It's funny how every year I seem to try to relearn everything I learned the year before instead of recording what worked and sticking with it.
    I always spend a week or so just looking around the house for all the cold weather gear.....this year I stored most of it on a stand in my bedroom....

  38. #1038
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    As a primer for the winter I've created a list of my winter riding clothing for a variety of temp ranges. That can be viewed here. It's funny how every year I seem to try to relearn everything I learned the year before instead of recording what worked and sticking with it.
    I've got one of those saved too:

    0C/32F - Start wearing shell jacket and merino skullcap.

    -5C/23F - Add flip-top mittens over my fullfinger gloves. Add 3-in-1 poly balaclava which covers my head, but lets me leave my face open. Add lightweight tights under shellpants. Switch to cheap, oversized hiking shoes with thick worksocks (I run platform pedals all year anyway).

    -15C/5F - Switch from mitten/glove combo to Snowboard gloves. It's probably time to start using the 3-in-1 balaclava as an actual balaclava.

    -20C/-4F - Add fleece sweater under shell. Switch light tights to fleece tights. Add second layer of worksocks. Add second liner to gloves. Possibly use forearm/calf warmers.

    -25C/-15F - Add neckwarmer over balaclava. Use both the fleece tights and light tights. Definitely use forearm/calf warmers. Add ski goggles.

    -30C/-22F - Pretty rare so I don't have any specific gear, but I make sure to have some chemical hand/toe warmers easily accessible for emergencies.

  39. #1039
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    Biking in the snow, Feb 1940, Iowa City

    Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Iowa City in the Snow: 1940

  40. #1040
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Cool pic. . .

  41. #1041
    mtbr member
    Reputation: trevordchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    59
    I live in Texas so a lot of you probably think I'm a major wimp but I'm going to need to invest in some "cold weather" gear before it gets too much cooler. I'm a college student on a budget so cycling specific stuff can be a bit pricey. Anyone have suggestions on any inexpensive gear that keeps you warm without making you crazy hot? Temps will be around 35-55, often with strong wind and always some humidity.

    And before any of you snow birds talk trash I lived in Aspen Colorado at over 8000 feet and 45 degrees here feels much colder than 25 there.

  42. #1042
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by vegascruiser View Post
    Cool pic. . .
    Says me, too. I like the dangly thing in his bars

    Quote Originally Posted by trevordchi View Post
    I'm a college student on a budget so cycling specific stuff can be a bit pricey. Anyone have suggestions on any inexpensive gear that keeps you warm without making you crazy hot?
    That`s easy for dry climates, should be possible for you too, maybe with a little more scrounging. Cheap layers with as many zippers as possible. Thrift shops and end of season clearance sales are my favorite buys, but sometimes stuff shows up cheap unexpectedly just about anywhere. I finally bought a genuine "cycling" jacket last year- that`s the only clothes I have that were actually marketed for bikes, and it`s only $45 at full price.

    Waterproof Jackets from People Who Really Know Waterproof Jackets!
    Recalculating....

  43. #1043
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    Trevordchi, I'd agree, a cruise though any thrift shops is worth a look, some "track pants" and some windpants (athletic warm-ups) should work. A thin wool sweater under a windproof jacket works wonders. I have also gotten some good deals on geartrade.com, a lot of stuff there is returns companies are trying to unload. A browse through any bike stuff website clearance or outlet might be worthwhile, especially if it lets you sort by % off, although you might find a lot of shorts there this time of year.

  44. #1044
    mtbr member
    Reputation: trevordchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    59
    Thanks for the tips guys

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk

  45. #1045
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,728
    Quote Originally Posted by WiTrailRunner View Post
    I have Raynaud's Disease, so managing my hands/feet gets difficult, especially since my ride to work takes me over an hour. I'll be perfectly fine for the first 30 minutes and then it starts to get bad and I become miserable. Maybe the too-big-shoes is the way to go. I buy those little hand hot packs in bulk, otherwise I never make it through the winter. I don't currently own any shoes that have room to stuff them in though.
    I suffer from the same, and cold/winter riding is pure agony for me sometimes. I found the cure for my hands, with some Pearl Izumi lobster gloves. My hands are so warm that they are actually sweating when I take them off. My feet, that is another story. I bought some Pearl Izumi wraps for my biking shoes that I will wear with wool socks, and those are decent, supposed to block the wind and help keep the warmth in. My toes still get cold and hurt, almost to the point of being unbearable. I have not messed with anything for my ankles yet, will have to look into that.

  46. #1046
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    For the coldfooted peoples...if you have not tried high-tops and flat pedals, I highly recommend them (I have 5.10 impact highs). Significantly warmer then low-tops, easy place to tuck in a warmer-pak by your ankle, and a better pant-cuff seal to eliminate the breeze between your pants and shoes (if you have some pants with elastic bottoms). I just bought an alpaca felt insole for them, but have not tried it yet; going to put one in one shoe at first to compare. In the past I used but was not overly impressed with the "astronaut" aerogel insoles.

  47. #1047
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by trevordchi View Post
    I live in Texas so a lot of you probably think I'm a major wimp but I'm going to need to invest in some "cold weather" gear before it gets too much cooler. I'm a college student on a budget so cycling specific stuff can be a bit pricey. Anyone have suggestions on any inexpensive gear that keeps you warm without making you crazy hot? Temps will be around 35-55, often with strong wind and always some humidity.

    And before any of you snow birds talk trash I lived in Aspen Colorado at over 8000 feet and 45 degrees here feels much colder than 25 there.
    Our winters in Vegas sound just about like yours. 35-55 range with the very rare occasional dip into the mid to high twenties. I work in public works and wear work clothes on the commute. Red Wing steel-toed boots, a light jacket with a hood and a heavy jacket over this. Two different pairs of generic Walmart gloves, a thin pair and a thick pair depending on how cold. A thick and a thin beanie hat--again from Walmart (I'm cheap). I just wear a pair of dickies work pants. If it's in the low thirties, thermals under the pants and work shirt and thicker socks in the Red Wings. I've never bought a bike specific piece of clothing and never intend to, and I can probably get away with this only cause I live in Vegas, which is good cause I'm cheap.

  48. #1048
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    My brother had Raynaud's diagnosed, and I had similar symptoms. Then we had our amalgam "silver" (actually half mercury) fillings removed safely and we treated (still ongoing), for the mercury exposure. No doubt some Raynaud's occurs without heavy metal exposure. Still, I pass on our experience, because as we got older other issues arose. YMMV. While dealing with Ranaud's before the amalgams came out, I just had to up the boot, leg, and hand coverage. Still had to peel the left hand off the handlebars and walk on feet that felt nothing, but they got normal a lot sooner. Good luck with this.

    BrianMc

  49. #1049
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,034
    On the subject of keeping hands and feet warm, blocking the wind chill using pogies (bar/hand covers) is a help for the hands and wrists.

    For the feet, my journey started with the usual measures: booties and thicker socks, then a pair of winter cycling boots that are a size bigger than I normally use, and leaving them loose.

    Booties that I've tried tend to either sponge up moisture, or let it in at the sole openings, so nowdays I just stick a plastic bag over each foot and figure-8 a rubber band to keep it in place if I happen to unclip. My cleat bites through the bag enough to do its job, without any large openings to invite water invasion.

    Last season I finally bit the bullet for a set of Hotronics e4 ski-boot heated insoles. On their maximum setting, they're a bit of a help... I can't feel their heat, but they offset my losses enough to get me through. However, they weigh a ton and are unwieldy to deal with. I wonder if a guy could create his own dynamo shoe heaters by sandwiching a ring of magnets between the pedal and crankarm, with an inductively-powered heating element in the shoe. I'd gladly sacrifice 15 watts to that

    In the big picture, feet sweat and I end up soaking my insulation. So for rides over 2 hours, it's not a bad idea to bring a spare pair of warm socks and do a swap.

  50. #1050
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    ^^ I like the pedal-powered foot heater idea!


    No cycling content, but watch and be amazed at his feats in the cold. It looks crazy but somehow he survives what looks impossible...
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sKT1Wvz3xm0?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  51. #1051
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    ^^ An IR film of him in the freezer would be interesting. Especially with a relay team of normals for comparison.

  52. #1052
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    357
    Anyone in the Pacific Northwest? We have a different kind of winter ride - miserable cold heavy rain hovering around 2C/33F, grey skies. Rain wear and visibility is a challenge, as it staying warm and dry.

  53. #1053
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    Check for riders near you here:

    MTBR Commuters - Make your mark on the map

  54. #1054
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,034
    Quote Originally Posted by canuckjgc View Post
    Anyone in the Pacific Northwest? We have a different kind of winter ride - miserable cold heavy rain hovering around 2C/33F, grey skies. Rain wear and visibility is a challenge, as it staying warm and dry.
    Yes, Eastern WA here. We don't get as much rain over here as the west side, but many of my longer homebound commutes end up being a war of attrition on one of those fronts (staying warm and/or dry), especially if I'm trying to get some training, which means I'm sweating a lot. Sweat like crazy uphill, freeze on the downhill, repeat.

  55. #1055
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993

  56. #1056
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    No biking season in Las Vegas either--year round riding.

  57. #1057
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    539
    Supposed to snow with a chance of accumulation tomorrow. I probably won't be looking forward to that in a couple months, but right now it means I get to ride my finally-complete Pugsley to work.

  58. #1058
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1
    This will be my first season commuting on bike. I am a Student Teacher for high school Biology and will go pro next year, so in this transition I am trying to build structure/foundation for the life I want to live, and that involves riding my bicycle to work everyday. I also do not have anyone to share the experience with, which mostly for me at the moment means figuring logistics is difficult: how do I get my laptop to work without getting wet/damaged? How do I get my clothes to work still pressed (I starch-iron that shit and it cannot be wrinkled by the time I get to work). I am going to purchase a rack and waterproof pannier bags tomorrow. Last week I drove up and dropped off my clothes for the week, but to keep with that routine I would have to drive at least one day, which might turn out to be inevitable, but any suggestions? I must limit the weight I carry on my back because I have a few herniating disks that rebel otherwise. My morning commute commitment officially begins on Tuesday 11/12/13 because it is my first day of Placement at the high school which is 11.6 miles away and in Santa Cruz I am fortunate for (weather one, and) single track: about 6 miles of the commute.
    I am excited to have found this forum to see the adventures of you folks, and I will post some lovely morning pictures from the green as well. Ride STRONG!

  59. #1059
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    ^^Welcome msscout! Gotta love the pedaling teachers influencing young people. You may find that the week's worth of clothes you brought in will last longer than anticipated if you are only wearing them inside, which could reduce how often you have to drive. Clean and used underthings are easy to tote back and forth. If possible, it would be great if you could leave the laptop at work and get documents home via flashdrives or the cloud. It's certainly possible to carry it, but I enjoy traveling light. Good luck with the bikecommute, and the first day at the H.S. - have you tried the route out yet?

  60. #1060
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Yes, welcome, msscout. . .

  61. #1061
    Squeaky Wheel
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,425
    Quote Originally Posted by canuckjgc View Post
    Anyone in the Pacific Northwest? We have a different kind of winter ride - miserable cold heavy rain hovering around 2C/33F, grey skies. Rain wear and visibility is a challenge, as it staying warm and dry.
    I live on the east side of Seattle and am a year-round rider. Good clothes and good lights makes the winter bearable.

  62. #1062
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    Ice with a coating of fluffy snow starting at midnight should make it to mid morning, here. Lake effect off Lake Michigan. Usually can wait until the fifteenth of November for snow tires on the cars and not see any snow until or even after Christmas. Shaping up to be memorable.

  63. #1063
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    Quote Originally Posted by WiTrailRunner View Post
    I had a miserable suffer fest on my ride home last night in 36 degrees plus a headwind the whole way. I needed an extra layer everywhere. Now this morning is 27 degrees and while I can add extra layers elsewhere, my worst issue is my feet.

    Currently I'm riding flats with a pair of Gore-tex Merrells and thick wool socks, but that's not warm enough. I've tried the whole wrap your foot in a bag before putting on your shoes thing and didn't think that really helped. So what the heck do you do to keep your feet warm in the 20s and 30s? My ride isn't short, so I'm not willing to just tough it out. Nor do I want to sink a whole bunch of money into buying something that I'll only use for another month or so. I'm not hardcore enough to keep this going once it snows. Easy solutions? Suck it up and pay a bunch of money for a pair of boots?
    Today I officially changed over from clipless to flats for the winter. On Saturday night I rode for two hours in 20F and by the end of the ride my feet were quite cold. Tomorrow morning it is supposed to be single digits, so time to break out the boots.

    I've worn Keen Revel boots for the past two winters and have been warm and cozy down to 20 below. I got them two sizes too big so that when it dips too far below 0 I can wear two sock layers. I generally use a thin Darn Tough sock as the base with a heavy weight Cabella's hunting wool boot sock on top. I picked my boots up at REI in the attic for something like 50 bucks. Feet and hands are the hardest to get the layers dialed in, but once you do, you'll be golden. Best of luck

  64. #1064
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Straz85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,348
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Today I officially changed over from clipless to flats for the winter. On Saturday night I rode for two hours in 20F and by the end of the ride my feet were quite cold. Tomorrow morning it is supposed to be single digits, so time to break out the boots.

    I've worn Keen Revel boots for the past two winters and have been warm and cozy down to 20 below. I got them two sizes too big so that when it dips too far below 0 I can wear two sock layers. I generally use a thin Darn Tough sock as the base with a heavy weight Cabella's hunting wool boot sock on top. I picked my boots up at REI in the attic for something like 50 bucks. Feet and hands are the hardest to get the layers dialed in, but once you do, you'll be golden. Best of luck
    I love me some Keen footwear. I had a pair of Targhee 2's that were recently downgraded to yard work duty because they're starting to fall apart, but they lasted a few years of heavy use, including a few backpacking trips, daily fall/winter/early spring wear and many day hikes. Also have a pair of their winter boots and casual shoes I wear to work.

    Single digits in early November, holy moly!

  65. #1065
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,071
    Back to car snot ice salt and slush

  66. #1066
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    The forecast was 1-3” of snow last night, and a chance of snow this afternoon as well, so I decided it was time to mount up the snow tires.

    The ice spiker pro’s I bought for last winter seem OK still, although the center studs are not as long/sharp as the outer ones. I’d forgotten how tight the clearance is on these 2.35’s in my ’98 Litespeed Unicoi frame, but they fit. I forgot to adjust the V brakes and the BB7 discs - they worked but were on the lame side. We ended up with about 2” at my house. It wasn’t the coldest morning, 20F, but it felt coldest because of the gusty winds, which were of course headwinds. I was glad I had added the pogies.

    I sadly drove the first 4 miles which was the snowiest part…by the time I parked my car at my normal multimodal lot at a lower elevation, there was just ice and a dusting of snow. At least the ice still justified the tire changeover. The ride was slow, but seemed more slowed by headwinds than by the studded tires.

  67. #1067
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    12F when I left the house at 4:30 AM. Dark and cold, but a nice ride all the same. A bit chillier when I got to town at 10F and then down to 8F as I moved from the bus stop to the office. The biggest challenge of my winter commute, apart from making my bus connection, will be the bus ride itself. Have to keep from sweating before getting on the bus, staying comfortable while on the bus, and not freezing once I get off the bus. Of course, there is carry over heat, so my first ten minutes are spent sweating and then I get cold. Have to work on that somehow.

  68. #1068
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    ^^Two things that helped me a lot when I had the bike-bus commute were bringing along a really warm “waiting for the bus hat”, and a thermos of hot coffee for the bus ride.

  69. #1069
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    The stories from all the multi-modal winter commuters have made me realize how tough that must be. Dressing for a ride at 0F or -10F is easy, but I would be way too underdressed to stand at the busstop for any length of time, and then would probably get sweaty on the bus.

  70. #1070
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    384
    So tonight was my first night in actual snow. I rode down well into the 20s and high teens last year (through mid December), but never when there was a layer of snow on the road. I was terrified that some idiot driver was going to take me out. Also almost ate it on an iced over concrete ramp. Considering a switch to a studded tire. Might switch bikes altogether to the flat bar MTB, but she would need a bit of love.

  71. #1071
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    So tonight was my first night in actual snow. I rode down well into the 20s and high teens last year (through mid December), but never when there was a layer of snow on the road. I was terrified that some idiot driver was going to take me out. Also almost ate it on an iced over concrete ramp.
    Pucker moments and danger...
    But in between, it sure is fun! Did you have a good time? Did you get to make an anaconda track down the middle of the road?
    Recalculating....

  72. #1072
    Natural Born Killer
    Reputation: nemhed's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    370
    19 degrees this morning, yesterday was warmer bu we had about 1/2 inch of snow on the ground. The roads were all clear and all was melted by the afternoon. I adjusted my usual 35 degree attire this morning by adding thermal long underwear under my tights and a balaclava. With my collars zipped up on my fleece pullover and my outer shell combined with the balaclava I was actually overheating by the time I got to work.
    Quote Originally Posted by Skrufryder View Post
    Silly rabbit Jack Daniel drinking donkey kissing caterpiller

  73. #1073
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,071
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    Also almost ate it on an iced over concrete ramp. Considering a switch to a studded tire.
    Yup doesn't make sense to risk it with out studs. There will always be a little patch of ice covered up by snow...in the wrong place it could easily put you down in front of a car.

  74. #1074
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    Yup, waiting for the bus is horrible. Last night it took me nearly three hours to get home due to poor traffic conditions. The bus ride was okay, but slow. By the time the bus ride was over, it was 7F and for the entire ride home I just couldn't keep my hands warm. No fun.

  75. #1075
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,307
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    By the time the bus ride was over, it was 7F and for the entire ride home I just couldn't keep my hands warm. No fun.
    You've got my sympathies. If it's pretty cold out (lets say below 0F) I've learned that there's nothing worse than making a quick stop where you warm up, and then heading off again while your gloves/socks/hat are still a little sweaty. That moisture is killer.

  76. #1076
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    You've got my sympathies. If it's pretty cold out (lets say below 0F) I've learned that there's nothing worse than making a quick stop where you warm up, and then heading off again while your gloves/socks/hat are still a little sweaty. That moisture is killer.
    I agree. Having sweaty gloves and hat is a killer. The strange thing about last night was that I had switched my thin liners for a completely dry pair of heavier weight liners. I think the coldness was due to a circulation issue - the heavier liners squeezed my finger tips.

  77. #1077
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    384
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Pucker moments and danger...
    But in between, it sure is fun! Did you have a good time? Did you get to make an anaconda track down the middle of the road?
    The trail was fun, and the icy concrete ramp is conquerable, but I'll be honest, the worry about drivers has me pretty spooked. I'll have to think on it some more, and see if anybody even wants to buy my damn truck.

  78. #1078
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211
    Ill = off the bike =unfit = slow = less heat production = more clothes than usual for the temp = the Bar Mitts went on. Can't wait until spring.

  79. #1079
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,422
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    The trail was fun, and the icy concrete ramp is conquerable, but I'll be honest, the worry about drivers has me pretty spooked. I'll have to think on it some more, and see if anybody even wants to buy my damn truck.
    Worrying about the other folks out there is a sure way to kill the mood. I've tried to build in my mind a fairly fatalistic view. It's not if I get hit, but when. And I take what steps I can to reduce my risks, but keeping in the back of my head that I'm doing all I can to be save allows me to turn that voice of worry way down. Kind of the cest la vie approach, right?

  80. #1080
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    384
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Worrying about the other folks out there is a sure way to kill the mood. I've tried to build in my mind a fairly fatalistic view. It's not if I get hit, but when. And I take what steps I can to reduce my risks, but keeping in the back of my head that I'm doing all I can to be save allows me to turn that voice of worry way down. Kind of the cest la vie approach, right?
    If you believe you'll eventually be hit, why do you keep riding? I can't come up with a good argument for continuing to ride if I accept that eventually I'll be hit and injured/killed.

  81. #1081
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,071
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Worrying about the other folks out there is a sure way to kill the mood. I've tried to build in my mind a fairly fatalistic view. It's not if I get hit, but when. And I take what steps I can to reduce my risks, but keeping in the back of my head that I'm doing all I can to be save allows me to turn that voice of worry way down. Kind of the cest la vie approach, right?
    The safest way to ride is to continual observe and recognize hazards, then mitigate those hazards as best as possible....(change routes, education, slowing down, signalling, lights etc etc). You will end up paying attention, smartening up, and being careful.

    Over the years you become better and better at this and therefore safer and safer.

    You end up riding routes that are nice and safe, you end up calmer and more in control...

    But most importantly you end up on the right side of the grass.

  82. #1082
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WiTrailRunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    191
    So this morning it was 30 degrees feels like 26 when I biked in. I'm okay for the first few miles, but then I start sweating. And once I start sweating, I'm okay for a while. But after about 10 miles, I become pretty miserable and wet and even colder, since it's the coldest part of the day right around sunrise. Am I over dressing? I feel like I would freeze if I had on less clothing. (Sorry, n00b question.) My commute is fairly long, so it's hard figure out what to wear.

  83. #1083
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by blockphi View Post
    Worrying about the other folks out there is a sure way to kill the mood. I've tried to build in my mind a fairly fatalistic view. It's not if I get hit, but when. And I take what steps I can to reduce my risks, but keeping in the back of my head that I'm doing all I can to be save allows me to turn that voice of worry way down. Kind of the cest la vie approach, right?
    I don't worry about being hit. I'm very careful and won't hesitate to do the salmon thing or ride a sidewalk if it means living to ride another day. If I feel an area is really unsafe I'll cross the street and ride against traffic. At least that way I can see what's coming. I'm sure my commuting antics leave many highbrow commuters scratching their heads. So be it. But I got to do this commuting thing my way to stay alive. While I think Vegas is making strides to be a better bike commuter city, it's not there yet, and some bike lanes literally have traffic whizzing by at forty five miles per hour and only feet from you. I ride the sidewalk every time in this scenario.

  84. #1084
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,993
    Quote Originally Posted by WiTrailRunner View Post
    So this morning it was 30 degrees feels like 26 when I biked in. I'm okay for the first few miles, but then I start sweating. And once I start sweating, I'm okay for a while. But after about 10 miles, I become pretty miserable and wet and even colder, since it's the coldest part of the day right around sunrise. Am I over dressing? I feel like I would freeze if I had on less clothing. (Sorry, n00b question.) My commute is fairly long, so it's hard figure out what to wear.
    It definitely sounds like too much clothing, sweating is the quickest way to get cold. Try one less layer, or a thinner layer, you have to start out on the cool side. If you're worried you'll be cold, bring along something easy to add in case you misjudged it. Sometimes you can just unzip a jacket or other layer to prevent sweating on an uphill section, and then zip up again as needed.

  85. #1085
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,148
    OK, so I am 4 months into my commuting by bike 3-4 times a week. How the hell do you guys not go homicidal (or windicidal?) about wind??!?!?!!!??!?!

    I turn enough in my commute that I ride literally almost every direction of a 360 degree circle at some point. And the wind knows this. And it's evil. So it shifts so I SOMEHOW have a headwind no matter what way I am going. But it's not just a headwind. That would just mean focusing my energy on going forward. NNNNoooooooooooo.... it's like a hybrid cross wind and head wind from the quarter. So not only do I focus on moving forward, I focus on going straight too since the damn bike gets blown all over the place.

    I'll ride in 0 degrees all freaking day. I'll commute in 85+ degrees. But this Fall, particularly the last few weeks, the wind has really picked up. 20+ mph is just not fun, so I won't do it. My last commute Friday before last) was 30 degrees (fine) with 25 mph headwind. Slowest time ever, and expended WAY more energy than ever. I was so pissed off by the time I got home I didn't even want to LOOK at the commuter bike for a few days.

    And then my wife asked me a very good question. "Why do you ride bikes?" "Because it's fun." "And did you have 'fun' on your ride today?" "Hell no. Stupid bike." "So why don't you just ride when it's nice outside and fun, or save the time by driving and then go on a mtb ride at night?" "BECAUSE I AM A BIKE COMMUTER DAMMIT!!!! Touche' though."

    But I haven't ridden the commuter since that day. Any tips on how to deal with wind?!?! I am trying to psych myself up to commute in tomorrow and it's looking like (surprise surprise) 15+ mph again.

  86. #1086
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spazzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,573
    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    OK, so I am 4 months into my commuting by bike 3-4 times a week. How the hell do you guys not go homicidal (or windicidal?) about wind??!?!?!!!??!?!

    I turn enough in my commute that I ride literally almost every direction of a 360 degree circle at some point. And the wind knows this. And it's evil. So it shifts so I SOMEHOW have a headwind no matter what way I am going. But it's not just a headwind. That would just mean focusing my energy on going forward. NNNNoooooooooooo.... it's like a hybrid cross wind and head wind from the quarter. So not only do I focus on moving forward, I focus on going straight too since the damn bike gets blown all over the place.

    I'll ride in 0 degrees all freaking day. I'll commute in 85+ degrees. But this Fall, particularly the last few weeks, the wind has really picked up. 20+ mph is just not fun, so I won't do it. My last commute Friday before last) was 30 degrees (fine) with 25 mph headwind. Slowest time ever, and expended WAY more energy than ever. I was so pissed off by the time I got home I didn't even want to LOOK at the commuter bike for a few days.

    And then my wife asked me a very good question. "Why do you ride bikes?" "Because it's fun." "And did you have 'fun' on your ride today?" "Hell no. Stupid bike." "So why don't you just ride when it's nice outside and fun, or save the time by driving and then go on a mtb ride at night?" "BECAUSE I AM A BIKE COMMUTER DAMMIT!!!! Touche' though."

    But I haven't ridden the commuter since that day. Any tips on how to deal with wind?!?! I am trying to psych myself up to commute in tomorrow and it's looking like (surprise surprise) 15+ mph again.

    Swear a lot about the wind, seems to work for me...

    In all seriousness maybe change your route a bit? My old commute was a straight shot down a road with larger buildings on either side, acted like a wind tunnel and I was miserable. Took about a half mile longer route through a more residential area and had less wind related problems, still windy some days but not a sustained 10-15 mph every day.

  87. #1087
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bike for days's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by msscout.mae View Post
    This will be my first season commuting on bike. I am a Student Teacher for high school Biology and will go pro next year, so in this transition I am trying to build structure/foundation for the life I want to live, and that involves riding my bicycle to work everyday. I also do not have anyone to share the experience with, which mostly for me at the moment means figuring logistics is difficult: how do I get my laptop to work without getting wet/damaged? How do I get my clothes to work still pressed (I starch-iron that shit and it cannot be wrinkled by the time I get to work). I am going to purchase a rack and waterproof pannier bags tomorrow. Last week I drove up and dropped off my clothes for the week, but to keep with that routine I would have to drive at least one day, which might turn out to be inevitable, but any suggestions? I must limit the weight I carry on my back because I have a few herniating disks that rebel otherwise. My morning commute commitment officially begins on Tuesday 11/12/13 because it is my first day of Placement at the high school which is 11.6 miles away and in Santa Cruz I am fortunate for (weather one, and) single track: about 6 miles of the commute.
    I am excited to have found this forum to see the adventures of you folks, and I will post some lovely morning pictures from the green as well. Ride STRONG!
    Welcome to bike commuting msscout! And teaching! I finished my student teaching this past spring, and you might as well call yourself a capital T teacher now because you basically will be. With all the joys and pains! I'm also a bike commuter of ten years in metro Philly area.

    Now, not to be discouraging, but I chose not to combine the two for student teaching.

    One reason was that both gigs (for music you do both K-8 and HS) were a stone throw away from Septa stops. The second is, and I don't want to be discouraging here, that you will be busier than you ever have in your entire friggin life. I needed the extra 30 min each day on the train to either mentally prepare, or polish off something I was up to 2AM working on, or just meditate. And being tired bike commuting can get dangerous.

    But again, I don't want to sound discouraging, just realistic! I know you want to go full fledged at the start, but that might lead to burn out. Maybe commit to biking in X many days the first month, one more the next, and one more the third? Definitely ride the route a few times loaded down to get an idea of how long and how tired you will be.

    You have the right idea about good change of clothes. As you know kids, but high schoolers in general, are very perceptive about appearance. It might seem minor, but it's not. Students will be quicker to respect someone that looks like all their other teachers, and not a sweaty stinky bike nut mess. Once you get past that trust/respect, then you can finally get to the learning I do bike into my current job (after school program... Getting hired for music is rough this year) and the kids definitely respect that about me, once they get over the typical teen comment phase. It also helps there are at least two other bike commuters at that school I know of. See if your co op will let you bring the bike inside somewhere? Maybe mention how you are biking in from wherever when you introduce yourself? Kids like a little mystery about their teachers

    I dunno if the part of Santa Cruz you are talking about is really urban, but honestly biking through the blocks near my school -helps- my safety if anything. The kids see me and yell hi across the street, and everyone keeps an eye out for each other. Unfortunately it's one of the worst traffic areas in Philly, so I have to do a really long route back at night to hit several bike lanes.

    Definitely buy the best waterproof panniers you can afford (the safe bet is Ortliebs) Then double up the protection (even just a plastic bag) on the laptop. I carry an ipad and I out it on the side I know I am less likely to slide to if I do take a spill. Then pad it with the clothes.

    Anyhow, that's my two cents and good luck this semester! Remember, they might call it student teaching the training wheels come off real quick! But you will have memories that you will never forget! I still tear up a little looking at the poster the K-8 kids made me, or watching videos of my hi school singers.

  88. #1088
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bike for days's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    156
    Err, I just saw your start date was 11/12... Somehow my brain read 01/12... Nov is an odd time to start! How did the first week go??

  89. #1089
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    OK, so I am 4 months into my commuting by bike 3-4 times a week. How the hell do you guys not go homicidal (or windicidal?) about wind??!?!?!!!??!?!

    I turn enough in my commute that I ride literally almost every direction of a 360 degree circle at some point. And the wind knows this. And it's evil. So it shifts so I SOMEHOW have a headwind no matter what way I am going. But it's not just a headwind. That would just mean focusing my energy on going forward. NNNNoooooooooooo.... it's like a hybrid cross wind and head wind from the quarter. So not only do I focus on moving forward, I focus on going straight too since the damn bike gets blown all over the place.

    I'll ride in 0 degrees all freaking day. I'll commute in 85+ degrees. But this Fall, particularly the last few weeks, the wind has really picked up. 20+ mph is just not fun, so I won't do it. My last commute Friday before last) was 30 degrees (fine) with 25 mph headwind. Slowest time ever, and expended WAY more energy than ever. I was so pissed off by the time I got home I didn't even want to LOOK at the commuter bike for a few days.

    And then my wife asked me a very good question. "Why do you ride bikes?" "Because it's fun." "And did you have 'fun' on your ride today?" "Hell no. Stupid bike." "So why don't you just ride when it's nice outside and fun, or save the time by driving and then go on a mtb ride at night?" "BECAUSE I AM A BIKE COMMUTER DAMMIT!!!! Touche' though."

    But I haven't ridden the commuter since that day. Any tips on how to deal with wind?!?! I am trying to psych myself up to commute in tomorrow and it's looking like (surprise surprise) 15+ mph again.
    Just put your head down and peddle through it. I actually feel a great sense of accomplishment on peddling through a horrendously windy day. Several weeks ago, 25-35 mph sustained winds with 45-55 mph gusts almost doubled my fifteen mile commute time. And while I did drive in to work the very next day in protest (I, too, did not want to see my commuter for a time), I was glad for the experience and I felt great accomplishment peddling up my driveway that evening, despite it taking double time. That said, if commuting in the wind ain't fun, and if you ain't getting at least something out of it, then just don't do it.

  90. #1090
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spatialized's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    172
    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    OK, so I am 4 months into my commuting by bike 3-4 times a week. How the hell do you guys not go homicidal (or windicidal?) about wind??!?!?!!!??!?!

    I turn enough in my commute that I ride literally almost every direction of a 360 degree circle at some point. And the wind knows this. And it's evil. So it shifts so I SOMEHOW have a headwind no matter what way I am going. But it's not just a headwind. That would just mean focusing my energy on going forward. NNNNoooooooooooo.... it's like a hybrid cross wind and head wind from the quarter. So not only do I focus on moving forward, I focus on going straight too since the damn bike gets blown all over the place.

    I'll ride in 0 degrees all freaking day. I'll commute in 85+ degrees. But this Fall, particularly the last few weeks, the wind has really picked up. 20+ mph is just not fun, so I won't do it. My last commute Friday before last) was 30 degrees (fine) with 25 mph headwind. Slowest time ever, and expended WAY more energy than ever. I was so pissed off by the time I got home I didn't even want to LOOK at the commuter bike for a few days.

    And then my wife asked me a very good question. "Why do you ride bikes?" "Because it's fun." "And did you have 'fun' on your ride today?" "Hell no. Stupid bike." "So why don't you just ride when it's nice outside and fun, or save the time by driving and then go on a mtb ride at night?" "BECAUSE I AM A BIKE COMMUTER DAMMIT!!!! Touche' though."

    But I haven't ridden the commuter since that day. Any tips on how to deal with wind?!?! I am trying to psych myself up to commute in tomorrow and it's looking like (surprise surprise) 15+ mph again.
    Wind is my nemesis. When I first moved to my town, I didn't mind the wind, it didn't bother me. My wife said that would change...it did. Spring and Fall suck here...windy. I've seen more weather alerts just fir wind this year than I've ever seen in m life. But I digress.

    How to deal? Head down, teeth gritted, swear words on the tongue and the rare sense of accomplishment when I get to work, kind of like flipping the bird to the weather. I've found that certain sections are terribly windy due to funneling effect of the road and buildings. Unfortunately, this consists 90% of my commute, no refuge. I've experimented with alternative routes which only adds time (and a chance of getting lost in most cases - unmapped outlaw trails) and doesn't help all that much. So I have to gut it out, try to make a game out of it...how much can I suffer. Do I enjoy it? No, there are days where I want to throw to bike into traffic and say "screw it". But the days where I conquer the weather make up for those. Grit is how to survive.

  91. #1091
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,148

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread

    Ha thanks all. That's about what I figured. We live in a pretty remote area so no tunneling effects thankfully.

    And yes, dropped more f bombs at the wind that day than any other time in my life. Lol

  92. #1092
    mtbr member
    Reputation: trevordchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    59
    The only day I didn't enjoy my ride was the day with 35 mph winds. I thought I was in shape until that day.

  93. #1093
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,148

    The Long Cold Winter Commuter Support Thread

    Well the bad storms that rolled through the Midwest are bringing thunderstorms and 30 mph sustained with gusts to 45. Guess I am pussing out tomorrow too.

    I am kicking myself now for the handful of days that were beautiful and perfect and I chose 30 minutes extra sleep and skipped a ride. lol.

    Lesson learned.

  94. #1094
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    Well the bad storms that rolled through the Midwest are bringing thunderstorms and 30 mph sustained with gusts to 45. Guess I am pussing out tomorrow too.

    I am kicking myself now for the handful of days that were beautiful and perfect and I chose 30 minutes extra sleep and skipped a ride. lol.

    Lesson learned.
    I can't count how many days I've peddled to work in terrible weather but drove in beautiful. Very aggravating indeed. . .

    So the one time in the wind that I actually tossed in the towel and called my wife to come get me, she couldn't get me cause I had both sets of keys to the Jeep with me. My jeep is the only vehicle I have with the receiver hitch bike rack. My wife did volunteer to pack my three kids into the van, however, meet me to get the key and then drive back in the Cherokee. Since this was during the kids' homework time and all, and because I knew at sometime in the future this incident would likely be used against me (how I interrupted the kids' studies even though my wife specifically told me that day to drive in), I just peddled through the last few miles. So windy it took me nearly forty-five minutes to go four miles.

    Gotta love the commuting life style. . .right now I'm contemplating whether to peddle the five miles to my CDL physical right now. Problem is, this clinic is in a seedy area and I don't want my bike stolen for a ten mile roundtrip commute. Not sure if there's a bike rack, etc., etc. Maybe I'll just hit the mt. bike trails this afternoon to get in my ride.

  95. #1095
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,071
    Quote Originally Posted by vegascruiser View Post
    Gotta love the commuting life style. . .right now I'm contemplating whether to peddle the five miles to my CDL physical right now. Problem is, this clinic is in a seedy area and I don't want my bike stolen for a ten mile roundtrip commute. Not sure if there's a bike rack, etc., etc. Maybe I'll just hit the mt. bike trails this afternoon to get in my ride.
    I park my bike inside the waiting room at my doc's office.

  96. #1096
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,211

    We do less shoveling?

    I've seen much the same in Central Illinois after a blowing storm:

    Name:  43255.jpg
Views: 232
Size:  105.3 KB

  97. #1097
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    3,827
    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    Well the bad storms that rolled through the Midwest are bringing thunderstorms and 30 mph sustained with gusts to 45. Guess I am pussing out tomorrow too.

    I am kicking myself now for the handful of days that were beautiful and perfect and I chose 30 minutes extra sleep and skipped a ride. lol.

    Lesson learned.
    Headwind is like a hill without a soul. Just gear down and suffer. I live north of Boston MA and wonder about the headwind in every direction. Just think about the cagers in their cars and smile. I have been blown over( onto grass). Last year, howling wind, blown over, head went into soft snow bank, up-to-neck. Laughed really hard, once I got the snow out from behind my glasses. Whoot.

  98. #1098
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Straz85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,348
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Headwind is like a hill without a soul. Just gear down and suffer. I live north of Boston MA and wonder about the headwind in every direction. Just think about the cagers in their cars and smile. I have been blown over( onto grass). Last year, howling wind, blown over, head went into soft snow bank, up-to-neck. Laughed really hard, once I got the snow out from behind my glasses. Whoot.
    What city do you live in?

  99. #1099
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    I park my bike inside the waiting room at my doc's office.
    Good idea, but since it's not a regular dr. I wasn't sure they'd let me. I ending up driving and NOT going on a mt. bike ride in the afternoon. Struck out twice for a bike ride.

  100. #1100
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7
    I commute in Las Vegas, it seems we get our share of wind in the spring and fall. My first year or two commuting I would not ride on windy days, then I realized if I didn't ride on windy days, I wouldn't be riding. So I learned you just ride, gear down and enjoy the workout.

Page 11 of 13 FirstFirst ... 78910111213 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •