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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    No sympathy for her. While I have no problem with standing up for her rights, it was obvious that that cop was bound and determined to hand her a ticket that day. When she kept arguing she just brought more grief on her self. If she disputes the premise of the ticket, you argue it in court, not on the side of the road. On the street, the cop is the law right or wrong, and there is no appeal except for his better nature (and he/she might not have one). Take it to the judge and you can argue it there without having the cop decide to increase the 'infractions' from a single ticket, to multiple tickets, or even a 'disorderly conduct' arrest (had that happen to my co-worker recently).
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  3. #3
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    That's pretty crappy.

    Whenever Rodar or Sixty-Fiver or someone posts one of their neat little folding bikes, I think that I should buy one just so that I can legally ride on the sidewalk (up to 20" wheels is legal here) during one of our police crackdowns, just to see if they actually know the bylaw. I bet they don't, but I also bet I'd get stuck with a made-up charge anyway.

  4. #4
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    I understand the indignity of a wrongful traffic citation. Hard to control one's temper and seek understanding. Counting to ten seems a good first move.

    Asking him to watch through a cycling light to see that the countdown matches the light turning yellow seems a reasonable second step. At least you would have that story of both witnessing the change is to yellow, not red, when you get to court. Here, at some intersections, it can happen a second or so later than that. Here, if your rear axle is on a point marking entry into an intersection (stop line, cross walk, curb, or shoulder of the cross road depending on the intersection markings or lack therof) when the light turns red, you are legal. This differs with traffic court decisions in each state. Some require that you have cleared the intersection before the red. Some red-light traffic camera cities were caught shortening the yellow too much to collect more fines. The bottom line is that you can't stop before entering on a yellow unless you are clairvoyant and know that the light is about to change!

    I would guess she has a good chance in court. But it is New York.

  5. #5
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    Amazing how so many car-vs-bike collisions are caused by women drivers....
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  6. #6
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    As always if you are getting a ticket...

    Give them the ID as Required...

    State that you have not had any alcohol...

    And then shut your mouth and wait.

    Once about 30 years ago I talked my way out of a radar speed ticket....

    but the damn cop kept my license.... so I had to get it replaced...there is no win on the side of the road.

  7. #7
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    NYPD can suck it....!

  8. #8
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    oops

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    No sympathy for her. While I have no problem with standing up for her rights, it was obvious that that cop was bound and determined to hand her a ticket that day. When she kept arguing she just brought more grief on her self. If she disputes the premise of the ticket, you argue it in court, not on the side of the road. On the street, the cop is the law right or wrong, and there is no appeal except for his better nature (and he/she might not have one). Take it to the judge and you can argue it there without having the cop decide to increase the 'infractions' from a single ticket, to multiple tickets, or even a 'disorderly conduct' arrest (had that happen to my co-worker recently).
    Its this kind of apathy for our rights that lets a police state fester.
    Stand Up!

  10. #10
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    It isn't apathy, it is realistic understanding of how our system works. The officer on the scene is the representative of the Law, and unless a higher ranking officer arrives, he/she is the only one there. While I wish all police were reasonable humans, only working for the best interests of the public, the fact of the matter is some of them are a bunch of self-righteous, power-hungry, bullying *&^^%'s. Knowing that some police aren't the pinnacle of human evolution, and also knowing that they have the authority to levy fines, or even imprison me if he/she believes it is necessary, I take the stance that if I believe that the officer is wrong, I won't argue on the side of the road where I have no power (and the officer has all the power), but wait until I get to a situation where I have both power and the means to apply it against the officer. It is hard to bite your tongue when you think you're being treated unfairly, but self-control is part of being an adult. Because that woman in the article didn't use her head she went from a stupid ticket that could have ripped up by the judge, to having a couple of criminal infractions levied against her (albeit very minor ones).

    You should always stand up for your rights, but if you don't do it intelligently, in the most effective way possible, then all you will do is dig the hole deeper, with more pain applied.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  11. #11
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    I'm not so sure that if she had just accepted the original ticket for running a red that a judge would have thrown it out. It would just be her word against the cop's, and "what reason would he have to lie?". Either way she would have to go to court, unless she just wanted to pay an undeserved ticket. I think she may end up better off with the trumped up charges in the end (i.e., more likely to get off). I hope we find out what happens.

  12. #12
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    GoPro, cheap, easy, record your commutes, if nothing happens delete the files, if something does you have evidence
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    GoPro, cheap, easy, record your commutes, if nothing happens delete the files, if something does you have evidence
    It's sad that it's coming to this, but I've actually considered it.

  14. #14
    sheep in FOX clothing
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    I stopped using my helmet cam on commutes. What's the point when:

    Quote Originally Posted by the toronto star
    Toronto police Const. Clinton Stibbe said the force has started to see videos submitted as evidence when cyclists have collisions or confrontations with motorists.
    But he cautioned that police don’t accept edited-down videos as evidence, and people may not want to submit their camera footage from an entire ride, since it likely also contains proof of their own traffic violations.
    “They’re going to make at least one mistake on that trip, intentionally or not,” Stibbe said
    "we're sorry that drunk motorist smashed you over the head with a beer bottle, but you seem to have rolled four inches past the white stop line 3 miles earlier..."

    What's really bad is they make thinly-veiled threats like that one, then are constantly whining that "witnesses are not coming forward" whenever they investigate a crime. Ya think...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I stopped using my helmet cam on commutes. What's the point when:



    "we're sorry that drunk motorist smashed you over the head with a beer bottle, but you seem to have rolled four inches past the white stop line 3 miles earlier..."

    What's really bad is they make thinly-veiled threats like that one, then are constantly whining that "witnesses are not coming forward" whenever they investigate a crime. Ya think...
    Small price to pay if (worst case scenario, I figure) I get a fine for rolling a stop sign, yet the video proof of the a$$hat yelling at me and intentionally clipping me with a mirror gets him tossed in the pokey.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I'm not so sure that if she had just accepted the original ticket for running a red that a judge would have thrown it out. It would just be her word against the cop's, and "what reason would he have to lie?". Either way she would have to go to court, unless she just wanted to pay an undeserved ticket. I think she may end up better off with the trumped up charges in the end (i.e., more likely to get off). I hope we find out what happens.
    Aroound here you just keep rescheduling the court date and they will eventually let you off scot free.

  17. #17
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    ^ I would submit my footage through a lawyer. I am not sure that the Constable is the final authority on what the Canadian Bill of Rights says on the matter of pursuing charges on other information peripherally attached to evidence in a case.

    I have had an officer threaten to shoot out a glove box lock when the key would not open it. My brother and I asked why we would keep the ownership and insurance papers in a folder under the seat if we could get in the glove compartment. I also pointed out that if the bullet penetrated the firewall and hit a fuel line, burning the car up there would be a big problem.

    In the continued search of this car (used as a pickup substitute on the farm) he found an axe with a splintery broken handle (impossible to wield without major hand damage) under some fertilizer bags.

    "Aha! a hidden weapon!" said the big dumb I-want-to-shoot-your-car cop.

    "I'll say it was hidden! I didn't even know it was there!" blurted out my brother.

    The second cop broke out laughing at the surprise in my brother's voice and we got to go on our way. Saved me asking him to demonstrate how one could use it effectively and splinter his hands up.

    So often, if you stay calm and the cop is acting the flaming you-know-what, they will either back off or do something obviously incorrect.

    I think the changed charges are much more easily refuted. I hope the judge is female.

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