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  1. #1
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    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...

    Very interesting documentary on bike theft. A good portion was on testing the very best bike locks. The FAHGETTABOUDIT chain lasted ten frickin' seconds:



    I was thinking of getting the FAHGETTABOUDIT chain + NY lock to secure my $5,500 bike on my roof rack while at work... Not so sure anymore. I'm open to suggestions!

    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...-166717_10151269691561367_120791817_n.jpg
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  2. #2
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    No lock can stop someone with the proper tools, they are merely deterrents.

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    ^^ Maybe there is a storage option at work, in the building, like your workspace?

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    ^^ Maybe there is a storage option at work, in the building, like your workspace?

    BrianMc
    Nope.

    I've opted to go with the 15mm NY Legend chain. I'll be connecting my frame directing to the Thule Aeroblade rails. I reckon they'll have to tear my roof rack apart in order to get to my bike, which I seriously doubt anyone will do in an open parking lot.
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    *** Since the tires insulate the car from the ground, I wonder what an electric fence shock system would do. Most people don't wear electrically insulating footwear. You would need a remote shut off. Being unpredictable about when to expect the bike will be at work would help. Parking near any video camera coverage or a maximum foot traffic area would too. They would jostle the car, so a sensitive car alarm should help if anyone was around to hear it.

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  6. #6
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    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...

    You have a hatchback. Drop the backseat and put it inside. That's what I do when I need a little better "out of sight out of mind" security.

    Currently have a Honda Fit I do this with and can fit two bikes. Picking up a new Subaru XV Crosstrek on Wed and hope to be able to do the same.

  7. #7
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    ^^ I hope you cover them up.

    Mountain bike stolen from locked car rack; other unrelated vehicle thefts and damages | Lethbridge News

    Three bikes stolen from vehicles (below). I bet they weren't covered up. I suggest a cover with old newspapers, magazines, McD and BoogerKing containers fastened to it to look as disgusting and as deep as possible and no sign of the bike showing. You may have to loosen the bars and rotate them.

    Stolen Bike Thread - VintageBMX.com

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    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...

    Guess it depends where you are. I haven't had trouble.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    I was thinking of getting the FAHGETTABOUDIT chain + NY lock to secure my $5,500 bike on my roof rack while at work... Not so sure anymore. I'm open to suggestions!
    Bring your bike inside the building when you get to work.

  10. #10
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    Ive seen thieves rip roof racks apart just to remove the bike. Now thieves are using portable battery powered grinders so if they want it theyll get it. For petes' sake dismantle it and stuff it in your car with a blanket over it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    *** Since the tires insulate the car from the ground, I wonder what an electric fence shock system would do. Most people don't wear electrically insulating footwear. You would need a remote shut off.
    While it would be effective, it'd also be against the law. Had a buddy in high school get 30 days for doing that to his car (fully restored '54 Chevy w/ blown 454).
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  12. #12
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    LOL, A blanket over something in the back of a car says to a thief ''there is something good under here thats worth covering up'' might as well put a sign on the car that says ''i have something of great value under the blanket in my car, thats why i bothered to cover it'' .....
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  13. #13
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    I concur with everyone... locks are just a small speed-bump. I follow the belief that whatever I put the public eye, I should be comfortable with it being stolen. So most bar rides, I run an ugly bike. And my main ride is pretty plain.

    I have never had a problem when using roof racks with fork mounts + locking cores.

    At work, our bike rack has a camera pointed at it. ???
    - The only thing that keeps me on a bike is happiness.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    Very interesting documentary on bike theft. A good portion was on testing the very best bike locks. The FAHGETTABOUDIT chain lasted ten frickin' seconds:



    I was thinking of getting the FAHGETTABOUDIT chain + NY lock to secure my $5,500 bike on my roof rack while at work... Not so sure anymore. I'm open to suggestions!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Why'd you bring your two bikes to work anyway? Show and tell day?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    LOL, A blanket over something in the back of a car says to a thief ''there is something good under here thats worth covering up'' might as well put a sign on the car that says ''i have something of great value under the blanket in my car, thats why i bothered to cover it'' .....
    Incorrect.. thieves have favorites depending on who they know and how fast they can off load an item. It's also a big reason why certain bikes are targeted and others left alone. For all they know it's your Time Life: Golden age of country collection under that blanket.

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    Years ago my sister's Chevette's window was busted in. A blanket and a quart of oil were stolen.

  17. #17
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    If I worked in a high crime area, had no safe bike parking there, and wanted to ride anyway, I`d leave my $5000 bike (assuming I had such a critter) at home and commute on my garage sale Murray cruiser.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Years ago my sister's Chevette's window was busted in. A blanket and a quart of oil were stolen.
    She had the oil hidden under the blanket and the thief thought he might have hit it big with a Time Life record collection under there. Was probably very disappointed, but took the oil and the blanket just to spite her.
    Recalculating....

  18. #18
    Levi Early
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    any chance of a shady area and my bike goes with me. I dont care what the rules are, my bike stays within my sight. When I lived in San Jose I would commute around with my bike, it would go in every store that I went into. People would look at me funny when I would walk it around. I think out of the two years I lived there, only once did I have a negative comment about it being inside a store. My reply was "well if you care to have my business, then i will have my bike in here with me" It was not like it was in the way of other people, once people realize that you care about your property then they will usually let it go. Obviously do not take in a totally thrashed out muddy bike into a store or business.

  19. #19
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    Well, I pulled the trigger on a NY Noose by Kryptonite and plan on using it in combination with my 2 other locks, one a Kryptonite u lock and the other a long thick cable lock. The Noose will be for the frame & the fixed object. The u lock for the front wheel to frame. The long cable for the rear wheel/frame and maybe the fixed object(was how I was locking my bikes prior before when I could see them). Well, even if locks can all be defeated, at least it will take some time and effort. Maybe the guy's bike next to mine will seem more interesting?

  20. #20
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    If you park it in one place with regularity, a determined thief will eventually find the right tools if the potential reward (a $5,000 bike) gets him motivated. But if it's a one time thing that you have to leave your bike for a while then there is a small chance a bike thief will come across your precious with the right tools with him.

  21. #21
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    Assuming you have time to replace it later, I'd remove the crank or at least one of the arms. It might be a $5000 bike, but nobody steals an obviously broken bike.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  22. #22
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    I've concluded with this solution using the Kryptonite NY Legend chain and lock. I reckon they'll have to tear my roof apart in order to get to my bike:

    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...-321476_123574201175917_1521990007_n.jpg

    My car is parked in an open, suburban parking lot during work. There's no space in the office to leave my bike in, so this as good as it will get... Which I think is pretty damn good. The rails, bike carriers and front wheel are key locked as well.
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    The blanket idea I had was to make the under hatchback area look like a biohazard/dump. Outside needs to look a bit unloved, too. Still could be broken into and explored, but they must be desperate to risk long-term illness. Unfortunately, there are some who might see it as 'homey'. If the bike is locked well to the car, the schmuck who would brave such a mess will not likely have the needed tools.

    It might be worth the fuel and time to go home to get the bike before heading out.

    BrianMc

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    The blanket idea I had was to make the under hatchback area look like a biohazard/dump. Outside needs to look a bit unloved, too. Still could be broken into and explored, but they must be desperate to risk long-term illness. Unfortunately, there are some who might see it as 'homey'. If the bike is locked well to the car, the schmuck who would brave such a mess will not likely have the needed tools.

    It might be worth the fuel and time to go home to get the bike before heading out.

    BrianMc
    While I agree that no lock and chain combination is 100% secure, I think I'm 99% safe here. No fool would dare hack away at my roof for a half hour using power tools. I should also add that my co-workers have good line of sight to my car and bike.

    The links on that chain are 15mm, and 16mm on the shackle. I believe chains 14mm and below are prone to bolt cropper attacks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    Assuming you have time to replace it later, I'd remove the crank or at least one of the arms. It might be a $5000 bike, but nobody steals an obviously broken bike.
    One missing crank arm does not make a broken bike.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gundam168 View Post
    One missing crank arm does not make a broken bike.
    You're right, it doesn't, however few thieves would bother to steal a bike that would require parts/fixing before selling. It might be worth $20-30 a month for a storage locker for the bike/s if you have to take them with you on a regular basis.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  27. #27
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    this might come across wrong, i certainly don't mean any offense, but i would park my $2000 bike right next to your $5500 bike and lock it up with the exact same lock. you don't have to be faster than the bear, you just have to be faster than your friend.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    I've concluded with this solution using the Kryptonite NY Legend chain and lock. I reckon they'll have to tear my roof apart in order to get to my bike:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    My car is parked in an open, suburban parking lot during work. There's no space in the office to leave my bike in, so this as good as it will get... Which I think is pretty damn good. The rails, bike carriers and front wheel are key locked as well.
    That looks like a pretty safe spot and lockup, but if you're leaving it on the car you really only need a lock a little stronger than the Thule crossbars, because those could be sawed through quite easily, allowing a thief to grab the bike and work on the locks at home.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by phirebug View Post
    this might come across wrong, i certainly don't mean any offense, but i would park my $2000 bike right next to your $5500 bike and lock it up with the exact same lock. you don't have to be faster than the bear, you just have to be faster than your friend.
    I have no idea what you're trying to say.
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    2 bikes next to eachother same locking system. which one is the thief gonna take? the 2k or 5k bike. I think thats what he means anyway.

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    Bike thefts and their statistics really have a severe dividing line; those bicycles close to or in your immediate possession and a wide gulf to the goods being out of sight. Add longer amounts of time with the bike sitting alone, and you're begging those results to include you eventually.
    The biggest initiator of the act of thieving is identifying the mark. Supply this link day in & day out, you lend to the exponential increase in risk. And it is a whole different game -and you want to then rely on the thickness of a piece of steel? I'd rather ply the murky stupid waters of bike politics inside the business where you work; the tide which will come to you if everyone is truly sensible (have more important things to think about).

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    Quote Originally Posted by grandsalmon View Post
    Bike thefts and their statistics really have a severe dividing line; those bicycles close to or in your immediate possession and a wide gulf to the goods being out of sight. Add longer amounts of time with the bike sitting alone, and you're begging those results to include you eventually.
    The biggest initiator of the act of thieving is identifying the mark. Supply this link day in & day out, you lend to the exponential increase in risk. And it is a whole different game -and you want to then rely on the thickness of a piece of steel? I'd rather ply the murky stupid waters of bike politics inside the business where you work; the tide which will come to you if everyone is truly sensible (have more important things to think about).
    Shut up. My bike won't get stolen.
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    You could put cinder blocks under your desk and sit on your bike.

    We know you know you love your bike(s).

  34. #34
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    My bike us usually locked in the car and out of view.

    It also saves fuel and prevents problems with garages and other low hanging bridges.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    That looks like a pretty safe spot and lockup, but if you're leaving it on the car you really only need a lock a little stronger than the Thule crossbars, because those could be sawed through quite easily, allowing a thief to grab the bike and work on the locks at home.
    Kind of what I was thinking.

    Hmmm... I`ve asked for advice and gotten good ideas that were a long way from what I`d expected. Also gotten advice that didn`t sound so good, but was given in good faith. In the case of not so trustworthy tips, I always figure a "thank you" and then disregard is polite enough. Even ignoring the advice completely with no reply isn`t particularly rude.
    Just sayin.
    Recalculating....

  36. #36
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    Much as we love our high end bikes, high risk storage sure seems to scream the need for a garage sale bike for commuting. I was gonna say several garage sale bikes but realize that one, even unlocked, would probably be fine.

    With so many bikes stolen in London, who the heck is buying them? Are the commuters basically trading bikes and fueling the thieves? I have always assumed that the low, low price on a stolen bike is a giveaway but perhaps the price isn't so low?

  37. #37
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    Find an old bike for cheap and Camouflage it

    ^^ Thats what i did. I ride a decent late 80's steel MTB i got for cheaper than dirt. Then I:

    1) Removed all the decals because some brands attract thieves more.
    2) Painted a custom acrylic rust patina everywhere rust usually forms on a frame.
    3) kept most components original except adding Kool Stops, Big Apple tires, nashbar "anti-theft" skewers that use an allen key.

    Nothing on the bike really shines/shouts steal me and i always D-Lock it in front of social places like coffee shops. The idea is, hopefully the thief will pass it up for the flashier bike parked nearby.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post

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    I like that lock and chain, looks beefy. I wonder how long until the hollow aluminum cross bars are sawed through though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 43st View Post
    Incorrect.. thieves have favorites depending on who they know and how fast they can off load an item. It's also a big reason why certain bikes are targeted and others left alone. For all they know it's your Time Life: Golden age of country collection under that blanket.
    if he got that collection, he'd stop stealing bikes.

    He'd be depressed as he kept hearing about girl cheating on their men from the music.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  40. #40
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    That was insane! I never put alot of thought behind how easy it would be.

    Here there are not many bikes, so likely not going to be much issue but I also will enter a store with the bike if there is no place to lock up at. Most places I'm not expecting much flak since they have carts available.

    At work I had attempted to talk my employer into a $70 wall mount hanging rack but they said they were too poor and to ask again in a year. So I bring it into the building and park it in an empty set of cubicles and have the backing of my sup to keep it there since I cannot lock it up outside. Eventually I will have to lock it up outside, when that happens I will lock it up on the enclosed patio.

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    Those guys killed a lot of locks with those big bolt cutters, but if you noticed, they were using their body weight against one of the handles that was grounded. I wonder if they would be as successful if they couldn't ground one of the handles? I bet the average person can't generate 20% of that body weight force pulling between their outstretched hands.

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    Dead post revival! Sorry folks, but I'm considering this lock as well. I've only got 2 bikes, a mountain bike and a road bike (no room in the apartment for a third cheapo commuter bike). I'll most likely be riding the road bike to work as I only live about 1 miles away.

    Unfortunately, the road bike is a carbon Trek Domane 4.5. Kinda flashy matte black and matte orange, white spokes. I haven't started this new job yet, so I'm not sure of my parking situation. Of course I'll try to take it inside if I can.

    OP, how has your locking system been working? Still have your bike?

    I've read poor things about Kryptonite's anti-theft policy. Anyone had luck with it?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    I was thinking of getting the FAHGETTABOUDIT chain + NY lock to secure my $5,500 bike on my roof rack while at work... Not so sure anymore. I'm open to suggestions!
    I suggest making sure that your homeowners/renters insurance covers your bike, if you're going to park out in the open regularly.


    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    I reckon they'll have to tear my roof rack apart in order to get to my bike, which I seriously doubt anyone will do in an open parking lot.
    I'm afraid you're wrong...


    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    No fool would dare hack away at my roof for a half hour using power tools. I should also add that my co-workers have good line of sight to my car and bike.
    It isn't going to take a half hour to cut through the aluminum crossbars and rails of your roofrack. It's going to take half a minute.

    Don't your co-workers have anything better to do than look out the window at your bike all day?

    My bike was stolen last year, and it was locked to a rack 10ft away from my office window while I was in a meeting elsewhere. Anybody looking out the window would've seen it happen. Nobody did.


    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    The links on that chain are 15mm, and 16mm on the shackle. I believe chains 14mm and below are prone to bolt cropper attacks.
    Duh, they won't cut the lock. They'll cut the roof rack.


    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    That looks like a pretty safe spot and lockup, but if you're leaving it on the car you really only need a lock a little stronger than the Thule crossbars, because those could be sawed through quite easily, allowing a thief to grab the bike and work on the locks at home.
    Exactly. Your weakest link isn't the LOCK, it's the roof rack. A big tin snips will go through your roof rack in seconds.

    Since my bike was stolen I park the same model bike (a new one) in the exact same place (lacking any good alternative), but I have a $200 18mm ABUS U-lock instead of a $50 ABUS cable lock. Now I worry they'll cut through the goddamned bike rack...


    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    Shut up. My bike won't get stolen.
    Repeat indefinitely, with hands over ears... LOL.

  44. #44
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    You understand this thread was started over a year ago?

    Anyways, zero issues. All is well. Also moved into a new office. My car is parked right at our front door, and my office is 10 feet away from that door. I completely forget about the bike when I'm at work.

    Let's all carry on with our life, yes?
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  45. #45
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    I usually take both wheels off and take it into the pub or restaurant, locking the frame up to the thing I'm locking it up on (Good U Lock). I could be wrong but not too often, but as others have said a partial bike is not worthy.

    MOST Thieves arent into selling frames and parts because it TAKES LONGER to do and the market is smaller. A complete bike is always easy to sell. I've taken my bike to the Manhattan, Huntington Beach, etc piers in SoCal and its always (the frame) still there at the bike rack. Looks like crap sitting there, LOL.
    Ride More, Eat More

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    Bike lock revival part two... Agree with the above poster, use a good D lock high enough off the ground that the bolt cutters can't leverage off the ground. And commute on a 400 dollar bike instead of a 4000 dollar one.

  47. #47
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    Kryptonite FAHGETTABOUDIT Cut in 10 seconds...

    id put your bike in the car, run locks thru the wheels (so they cant ride off with it) and lock it to the inside of your car. id also get a car alarm that can page you if anyone breaks into your car. id look into insurance too that would cover it

    or take a pos to work and save your good bike for the weekend

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    Is it me or has kryptonite's chain quality gone to crap over the last decade or so?

    I would use either ABUS or Pretector chains with ABUS or ABLOY or MulTlock or something like that. Sargent and Greenleaf if you got the green. The bicycle directed companies seem to make junk.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by lighty View Post
    Is it me or has kryptonite's chain quality gone to crap over the last decade or so?

    I would use either ABUS or Pretector chains with ABUS or ABLOY or MulTlock or something like that. Sargent and Greenleaf if you got the green. The bicycle directed companies seem to make junk.
    same quality it's always been. every time a popular manufacturer introduces something "new" into the lock mix, it works well on thieves for awhile...until the thieves figure out a method to break it. the only thing that really works is keeping your bike where thieves don't know where it is. if they don't know there's a bike, and they don't know where it is, they can't steal it.

    otherwise, anything is fair game with the right tools.

  50. #50
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    I thought their chains use to be made in Italy, but are now made in china.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by lighty View Post
    I thought their chains use to be made in Italy, but are now made in china.
    not anytime recently. always China AFAIK.

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    Get over your thread age-ist attitude dude. Old threads can be useful too!
    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    You understand this thread was started over a year ago?

    Anyways, zero issues. All is well. Also moved into a new office. My car is parked right at our front door, and my office is 10 feet away from that door. I completely forget about the bike when I'm at work.

    Let's all carry on with our life, yes?

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thimk View Post
    Anyways, zero issues. All is well. Also moved into a new office. My car is parked right at our front door, and my office is 10 feet away from that door. I completely forget about the bike when I'm at work.

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    Wouldn't the car alarm go off? Maybe adjust the sensitivity?

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    Well, that was more like 20 seconds, but still, it was pretty fast.

    I would never leave a bike unattended on a rack like that...

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by LemonDrops View Post
    Wouldn't the car alarm go off?
    And? By the time someone hears it, gets off their backside to see where it's coming from, come and told you and you get out of the door the bike will be sold on! If anyone bothers to react to the alarm at all, which is doubtful.

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    There was actually somebody sitting in the black car, two stalls away, and he/she jumps out as the thieves are leaving, but by then it was too late...

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    I transport my bike inside my car. My logic is that I can spot a roof/rear rack in a crowded parking lot very easily, with the bike inside, you'd have to at least be up close to see through the windows.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 43st View Post
    Incorrect.. thieves have favorites depending on who they know and how fast they can off load an item. It's also a big reason why certain bikes are targeted and others left alone. For all they know it's your Time Life: Golden age of country collection under that blanket.
    If you have, say, grey interior and you manage to get a piece of material that's a similar color,. like maybe some fleece from the fabric store, you should be able to somewhat conceal the bike. Thieves of opportunity are the worst. Make it look like just another car, complete with your alarm system and such, they're going for an easier mark. Ain't rocket surgery

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    Ever seen how people lock up motorcycles?

    A very tough security chain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lDcViM1EKc

    A very tough padlock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47uTBJP-Wak

    A bombproof ground anchor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-TiYLhHeaU

    If you want to bring a bike to work, cargo vans are available which have no rear window, no side windows and a permanent, opaque (i.e. steel sheeting) partition between the cab and the cargo area. If someone smashes a window, they only have access to the cab.

    For your home, alarm systems are available which will alert the police and the police will respond within 5-10 minutes. The security chain and lock listed above take at least 8 minutes to defeat.

    For the "cargo van at work" idea, phone apps are available which will alert you as soon as the van is tampered with. Use the security chain and padlock listed above, and you have 8 minutes to get out to your cargo van and confront the thief.

    High resolution security cameras are surprisingly affordable.

    Finally, you can hide a GPS unit in your bike which will call your phone when the bike is disturbed and geotrack any stolen bike.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by vadimhellbike View Post
    For your home, alarm systems are available which will alert the police and the police will respond within 5-10 minutes.
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.... :0)

    Where the heck do you live? Where I live the cops wouldn't show up in under ten minutes if you lived next door to the police station. You are doing well if they turn up at all. Maybe you'll get a phone call after twenty minutes asking if you still want them to come!

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    yeah, alarm systems are shit. thieves are gone before cops show up, and there's nothing left to help the cops track the bastards down. security cameras with battery backup and cloud storage are where it's at.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.... :0)

    Where the heck do you live? Where I live the cops wouldn't show up in under ten minutes if you lived next door to the police station. You are doing well if they turn up at all. Maybe you'll get a phone call after twenty minutes asking if you still want them to come!
    I live in the country myself. If I told 'em I have a perp held at gunpoint and I'm gonna kill him, it MAY speed things up. Say shots fired and they'd be there in about 10 minutes. Alarm system? 2 of 'em. They're furry and one wants a pet right now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.... :0)

    Where the heck do you live? Where I live the cops wouldn't show up in under ten minutes if you lived next door to the police station. You are doing well if they turn up at all. Maybe you'll get a phone call after twenty minutes asking if you still want them to come!
    I live in town. I was told that the average response time would be 8 minutes, but I have not had an occasion to test it.

    This is a paid service with a very expensive monthly fee. If the alarm goes off accidentally, there is a $150.00 fee that goes to the police department for wasting their time coming out. This is partially why I haven't tested it.

    I am not talking about the loud burglar alarms that just make noise. Commercial alarm systems are more sophisticated and designed to have the city police catch the burglars in the act.

    The monthly fee goes to the city for a service contract. Their end of the bargain is to respond to a burglary in progress as soon as the alarm is tripped. I would take this to mean that their dispatch would send the nearest unit to the scene.

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    The monthly fee goes to the city for a service contract. Their end of the bargain is to respond to a burglary in progress as soon as the alarm is tripped.
    So you pay for a service non paying customers should expect and demand whenever they pick up the phone and dial 911.
    got it.

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    You can't pick up the phone and dial 911 if you're not home. I was talking about burglary, not a robbery or home invasion.

    A non paying customer does it the low tech way. If they are home, I imagine that they would probably grab a gun before the phone. If they are not home, they have to hope that a neighbor calls in. What if the neighbors aren't home or don't notice?

    This is how a commercial burglar alarm works: the silent alarm is tripped, that alarm is connected to the police dispatch, and dispatch sends out a response for the burglary in progress. The "non paying customer" has no communication with the police when they are not home. A commercial burglar alarm is a really effective method for getting a perp convicted, not to mention keeping you from having your expensive bikes stolen.

    Use quality chains and padlocks in order to keep the thieves busy grinding until LE can arrive. Each of the chains and padlocks that I listed above will take a minimum of 8 minutes to defeat. If your alarm system cannot get an officer there in that time, use a second chain and padlock.

    Most of the padlocks, U-locks, cables and chains that people buy aren't even a challenge for a bad guy with large bolt cutters. Stay as many steps ahead of the thieves as you can, unless you can live with having your bikes stolen.

    Anybody who wants to steal your bike should have to get through several well thought out layers of security. Add enough layers and the prospective thief will either fail to steal your bike or be taken into custody, caught red handed. Either way, you still have your bikes.

    I have had stuff stolen before. Trust me, get proactive before it happens. Knowing that you could have prevented becoming a victim by implementing a few simple steps is even worse than having your stuff gone.
    Last edited by vadimhellbike; 11-27-2016 at 01:10 PM.

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    friend of mine had his bike stolen from the trunk of his G35. he takes it apart and stuffs it in there. no windows. all that means is someone was watching him put his bike in there. If someone wants what you have and are willing to risk it, they will get it. There are ways to slow them down or deter them.

    I did a test one time in a busy parking lot to prove to another friend that people do not care or notice theft. I parked my truck with my bike on the back and went into the store for a bit. I walked out suspiciously and started messing with the bike. pulled it off the rack and rode off. there was probably 15-20 going in and out of the store. not one hey stop! one person watched then walked away.

    I think one of my deterrents is that my bike costs a lot more than my truck. someone might not think the bike is worth it attached to a dirty beat up truck.

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