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  1. #1
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    Just bought a new commuter

    I got sick of wet rims that were getting chewed all-to-heck by road grit. Not to mention having little braking power when it's raining...which it tends to do here in Oregon. I also wanted something efficient that was more compliant than my rigid MTB.

    So, today I went to the LBS and bought one of these:



    The shop had a pile of Bontrager Select Disc wheels they got cheap so they sold me a set of those in exchange for the Richey rims that were on the bike. They just happened to have 2 sets of Avid BB7 Road disc brakes on sale. Before I left the shop I had also bought full fenders, a disc compatible rear rack and a pair of Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. They knocked 10% off everything but the bike and will have it ready for me on Friday.

    The reason I selected this bike: comfort. I rode things like the Scott Sub10 and similar disc equipped "urban" bikes and they are just as stiff and vibration prone as my old Fisher AL-1. They would be great bikes for ripping around town but I'm riding 28 miles/day on a highway and the vibration just gets to be annoying. I may also do some light touring and this bike should serve me well in that department too. And who knows...maybe I'll throw the cross tires back on it and take it up in the woods periodically.

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    SWEET. One of these days I'll jump on the CX commuter bandwagon, but for now I'm still spending time and money upgrading my rigid MTB commuter.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  3. #3
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    Yeah...I was doing that and ended up spending a lot of money and wound up with a bike I'm still not totally satisfied with. The Redline was more money than I really wanted to spend but I know I'll use it and enjoy it for a long time.

  4. #4
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I love my Trek. It's light, fast and maneuverable but yeah, it is getting costly. I put a longer quill and riser bars on, so I had to redo the cables but I screwed something up and couldn't get the derailleurs adjusted right. After fiddling around with it for a couple of days I finally gave up and brought it to a shop. But anyway, have fun with the Redline. That is one sweet ride!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  5. #5
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    Nice ride

    Gee, look what I bought for commuting when I moved to Portland.

    Glad to hear you left the stupid canti breaks at the LBS and got fenders too.
    Sounds like you found a shop where they like to build unique stuff, good choice.
    Maybe you could plug 'em here eh?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    Bike Shop Plug

    Corvallis Cyclery in Corvallis, Oregon.

    I bought my very first bike from them when I was 11. I worked all summer picking blueberries to get that Miyata Americana. Some of the same people still work there today over 30 years later!! They are an awesome bunch of guys and they really do a great job. There's not a salesman in the bunch. Some wrench more than others but they are all riders and long time enthusiasts. If you need a set of wheels built, Dan is approaching godlike status.

    The shop is crawling with mechanics - it seems like there are at least 5 people working whenever I'm in there. It's not surprising because every new bike that they sell gets a complete teardown and rebuild before it goes on the floor. They do this even with the low-end mass produced bikes. They told me once it is not uncommon for them to put a whole new bottom bracket in a brand new bike because the one from the factory was over torqued or cross threaded.

    They are also very good about finding creative ways to save their customers money. If you want more high-end parts, you might have to tell them that specifically because they will try to find the most budget-conscious solution that will meet your needs. They never try to steer you to the most expensive bike or accessory.

    Now that I think of it, with the exception of one, I have bought every new bike I have owned from that same shop. This is notable because there are 5 bike shops in our little town and they are all pretty good.

    My history of new bikes:

    1977: Miyata Americana (Corvallis Cyclery)
    1983: KHS Special (Rainbow Cyclery - now defunct)
    1988: Mountain Sport Montana (Corvallis Cyclery)
    1989: Fisher AL-1 (Corvallis Cyclery) I just sold that frame today.
    2009: Redline Conquest (Corvallis Cyclery)


    Bottom line: Corvallis Cyclery is an excellent shop. Don't expect a museum or boutique atmosphere...this is a bike shop. There are no fancy shiny parts in exotic glass cases. Just lots of bikes, lots of parts, lots of accessories.

    The only downside...they close too early. 5:30 every day. Considering that most of their customers work until 5 or 5:30, they are practically forcing people to go elsewhere. And when two of the other bike shops in town are just a block away and close at 6:30 and 7...well, do the math.

  7. #7
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    yeah the LBS I like is open 11-6 weekdays, 11-4 or 5 Saturdays, so not easy to actually reach. I eventually found it was worth it when I got there.

    Sweet ride, enjoy!

  8. #8
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I live in Eugene/Portland and I'm trying to figure out what you are all doing with gears. Sweet redline though. Cross bikes are sweet and redline has a great rep. I really like your tire choice too. How big of tires did you go with? How large of tires can you get to fit with fenders?

  9. #9
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    I got skinny planet bike fenders that will accomodate up to about 30mm I think. There's enough room for something bigger but I want a clean look. I think the tires I got are 28mm.

    I have been running the Marathons on my mountain bike commuter for about 1500 miles and I haven't had a single puncture related flat. I had a recent tube failure and inspected my rear tire carefully. I found about 5 pieces of glass buried deep in the rubber. I dug them out and they were all pressing up against the kevlar belt. Needless to say, I like those tires. The Marathon Plus is probably overkill with the extra puncture protection but I hate fixing flats in the rain.

    I had second thoughts about the frame size so I went back and rode a 54cm Conquest Sport today. It feels so much better than the 56. I can just about close my eyes and my hands fall right on the brake hoods. The drop position is not a stretch either. They are going to have to order in a 2009 but it should be ready by next Thursday.

    I'm sooooo pumped!!! Now I just have to figure out how I'm going to sleep until then.

  10. #10
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    I finally gave up on rim-brakes when my rear rim sidewall separated at high speed while I was riding down a steep hill. It was pretty scary but luckily did not result in a crash. I bought a Brodie Infinity with hydraulic discs and have been commuting on it for the last 3 years. The disc brakes are fantastic. They work great in wet or dry conditions, are much more powerful, and are very easy to modulate. I like not having to maintain brake cables as well. I think you are going to love your new ride. Is it steel?

  11. #11
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    Very nice rides, but am I the only one on the face of the earth who rides a reliable, sub-$500 commuter bike? I thought commuters were intended to spare your "good" bike.

  12. #12
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    I spend far more time aboard my commuter bike than on any of my other rides. I bought the best bike I could afford to commute on. I must confess though, I also have a nice road that I ride on weekends.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks
    I finally gave up on rim-brakes when my rear rim sidewall separated at high speed while I was riding down a steep hill. It was pretty scary but luckily did not result in a crash. I bought a Brodie Infinity with hydraulic discs and have been commuting on it for the last 3 years. The disc brakes are fantastic. They work great in wet or dry conditions, are much more powerful, and are very easy to modulate. I like not having to maintain brake cables as well. I think you are going to love your new ride. Is it steel?
    I'm glad you came through your wheel failure intact.

    The Redline is actually aluminum but it has s-bend seat stays so it is a pretty smooth ride. I have owned steel bikes in the past and since I spend a lot of time in the rain, rust becomes an issue.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlh
    Very nice rides, but am I the only one on the face of the earth who rides a reliable, sub-$500 commuter bike? I thought commuters were intended to spare your "good" bike.
    I've put 1500 miles since I started commuting in August. All of that was on sub-$500 bikes. I retired my 1989 Fisher AL-1 (which was $850 new) and just sold the frame on Friday. I hated to see it go but I know it would hang in my garage for years and never get used. It went to a woman who used to have but that was stolen.

    The number of highway miles I am logging makes me want to be more comfortable than I can on a rigid mountain bike frame. If I am happy with my ride, I will stick with it. So...I spent the money to have something that I really look forward to riding. It's all about what matters to you.

    I really considered a 29er but those are pretty stiff too and I wanted something with drop bars and fully integrated shifters. The Redline was just about the only thing I found that met all my needs. The amazing ride quality is just a bonus.

    I guess I should mention that my "good" mountain bike doesn't do road duty so in a way, I am meeting your criteria of saving that bike. But like Skooks said...if I'm going to spend 2 hours a day - every day - in the saddle...I want a nice bike to ride.

  15. #15
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Both of my bikes are sub 500.

  16. #16
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    Thats interesting, I've been considering a move to Corvallis. I've heard good things about the cycling there.

    Thanx for another.

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