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  1. #1
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    IWill someone help me please?

    I have a Raleigh SC30 that I am going to be using for commuting mainly. It has a ridged front fork and I would like to chame it to a set of forks that has shocks in it. Is that possible and is it possible to find something in a not so pricey range that will work on this bike? Any help will be appreciated.


  2. #2
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    It looks like that bike has a threaded headset. So to put a suspension fork on you would need to change the headset and stem. Much more trouble than its worth. Just put a bigger tire on the front if you feel you need a little cush. And angle the seat up a bit.
    read KNOBBY MEATS or be sadly ignorant of the mediocrity that is allowed to exist in the interwebs

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    +1 on fat slicks. Measure the clearance on the fork and rear stays to see if you can fit some Schwalbe Big Apples (26 x 2.35") or Maxxis Hookworms (26 x 2.5"). Balloon tires are the cheapest and easier "suspension mod" you can set up on your old rigid.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by the munts
    It looks like that bike has a threaded headset. So to put a suspension fork on you would need to change the headset and stem. Much more trouble than its worth. Just put a bigger tire on the front if you feel you need a little cush. And angle the seat up a bit.
    Threaded into the head-tube?

  5. #5
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    Threaded into the head-tube?
    Threaded into the headset. The headset is pressed into the headtube. check here
    read KNOBBY MEATS or be sadly ignorant of the mediocrity that is allowed to exist in the interwebs

  6. #6
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    It`s probably possible to put a suspension fork on your bike, but since the frame wasn`t designed for it, after a whole bunch of dinking around you`d end up with a badly handling chopper anyway. I agree with the other guys- your best bet is to leave it alone and enjoy it as is or look for a different bike. Before you start thinking your bike is junk because of its rigid fork, consider that a number of people start out with suspension forks and then swap to "suspension corrected" rigid forks due to the benefits you already have. Just sayin`.

  7. #7
    Another Retro Grouch
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    These guys are right. It's a nice bike, I'd ride it as is for a few weeks and see if you don't start feeling its love.

  8. #8
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    I agree. I generally fail to see the benefit of commuting on a soft fork... to each their own, but I would rather have a solid fork on the road.
    -Jeremy
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  9. #9
    BIG and Bald
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    Bigger tire up front and spend the rest of your $$$ on a suspension seat post.
    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  10. #10
    EXORCIZE
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    I totally agree to think twice before going with suspension. Besides the other reasons, it will sap your pedaling power, will be and feel heavier, look less cohesive, and be more of a theft magnet. Also, good suspension forks are friggin' expensive and the cheaper ones are not very useful, IMO.
    ride natty ride

  11. #11
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    I'll try to throw a little more detail your way as to why a shock absorbing fork won't work very well on that bike.

    Since it was designed for a rigid fork, the front of the frame is lower. A shock absorbing fork has to be taller to allow the wheel to move up and down. If you put one on that bike, it will lift the front end by a couple of inches. This also changes the angle that the whole frame sits at and will make the bike handle funny.

    Another thing to remember is that if you are looking for a low-cost suspension fork or a bike that has one, the fork tubes will usually be chrome plated. This isn't the best choice for a commuter that sees a lot of bad weather or parking outdoors because chrome will get rust spots which will cause the seals to leak.

    So, from a maintenance standpoint, the rigid fork is actually best.

    Like people here have said, some fat slick tires (ie: Schwalbe Big Apples) will roll easy and will have enough cush to make the ride more comfortable. They also don't flat easy.

    Good luck and good job on bike commuting!

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