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  1. #1
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    I've learned something today.....

    In honor of the ole Southpark line and my past two days, I decided to start this.

    I figure we all might learn something about commuting each day, however big or small. Would be nice to just compile them in a thread. We'll see what happens.

    Yesterday:

    My first commute in a week and a half (personal issues). Struggled on my way to work. Was pissed off at my out of shape self. Legs were sore during the day, and I was dreading my ride home. When I became winded approximately 1/5 of the way in, and prior to the giant hill that is my bane going home, I decided it could not be just my out of shape self. I checked to see if the fenders I just installed were rubbing. No dice. Maybe I AM just fat? Went for a little bit more to the bottom of the hill.... still struggling. Hop off. WTF? Spin my front tire no issues. Spin my rear.... stops in less than a second. Rear break was rubbing on one side. One tiny screw was making me feel shitty about myself, and overly sore.

    Learned: Don't be so quick to get down on yourself, if you are struggling. Make sure you aren't fighting a losing battle (against your fenders, brakes, chain etc)

    Today: Not such a long story. After having been hit a few weeks ago, I find myself much more appreciative of drivers that are courteous and respectful. Now I make my appreciation known. It shouldn't be that way, and it IS sad, but I will do it.

    Learned: Show appreciation for drivers that opt not to turn in front of you, or bully their way, or just let you go first. Give them the wave, thumbs up, props, nod, whatever works so they know you notice their respect for you. It rewards them for good behavior, is likely to make them do it again, and if there is someone with them or traffic is around someone else will see it too.

    Hope this turns out to be helpful. Lets hear it.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jflurett
    , I find myself much more appreciative of drivers that are courteous and respectful. Now I make my appreciation known. It shouldn't be that way, and it IS sad, but I will do it.
    ar it.
    it not sad and it should be that way.

  3. #3
    Riding makes me happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jflurett

    Learned: Show appreciation for drivers that opt not to turn in front of you, or bully their way, or just let you go first. Give them the wave, thumbs up, props, nod, whatever works so they know you notice their respect for you. It rewards them for good behavior, is likely to make them do it again, and if there is someone with them or traffic is around someone else will see it too.
    I'm all for the big thumbs up for courteous drivers. I ride out in the country sometimes and I'm always nice so they don't dump me in a ditch and leave me for the coyotes. I even wave them on if they are waiting behind me on a blind curve and I see that it is all clear.

    On the flip side, jerks that are uncourteous sometimes get a little bird action. If I am riding in the city and catch them at a stop somewhere I give them a water bottle squirt to the window. I probably shouldn't do stuff like that, but I get heated sometimes.

  4. #4
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    This is going to be really lame, but today I learned basically to TEST out newly installed equipment before doing a commute with it. On my MTB, I opted not to install a front derailer as I ride it only on the road and always stay on the large chain ring up front. Because of this, there is no guide for the chain and at times I have had the chain pop off due to the bike getting jarred one way or another. I looked around and finally decided to see if I could find a chain tensioner to keep it on a little easier since I didnt want to pony up for a full out chain guide.

    Against advice I ordered the Kore chain reactor because I found it really cheap. I installed it OK, but it was too cold last night to gear up and test it out (or so I thought) I did some dry-spins and everything looked good.

    Jump on it this morning and the first mile is OK, after that a tremendous racket that sounds like a flock of angry parakeets erupts from the device. Be it the cold or whatever, but the urethane roller was screeching along the metal pin that holds it on. I rode to work and it continued to get worse. By mile 3 I realized that the device had thrown my rear derailer alignment out of whack enough to start auto-shifting and not centering in the desired gear.

    At work I tried to fix it, but couldnt find an allen key the right size to take it off (I guess lesson #2 would be to bring special tools to remove or adjust new items on the first few rides). I limped back home with it on and listened to the angry parakeets while my bike kept doing this real neat upshift when I would stand up to pedal hard.

    As soon as I walked through the front door I took the POS off and tossed it in a corner.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by seosamh
    it not sad and it should be that way.

    I disagree. People don't deserve cookies for doing stuff they are supposed to.

    Do you give people thumbs up when you are in a car and they don't rear-end you?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jflurett
    I disagree. People don't deserve cookies for doing stuff they are supposed to.

    Do you give people thumbs up when you are in a car and they don't rear-end you?
    if you are in a car and someone lets you by/stops, you acknowledge them, it's good manners should be no different. i don't drive and even i know that.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helmsdini
    This is going to be really lame, but today I learned basically to TEST out newly installed equipment before doing a commute with it. On my MTB, I opted not to install a front derailer as I ride it only on the road and always stay on the large chain ring up front. Because of this, there is no guide for the chain and at times I have had the chain pop off due to the bike getting jarred one way or another. I looked around and finally decided to see if I could find a chain tensioner to keep it on a little easier since I didnt want to pony up for a full out chain guide.

    Against advice I ordered the Kore chain reactor because I found it really cheap. I installed it OK, but it was too cold last night to gear up and test it out (or so I thought) I did some dry-spins and everything looked good.

    Jump on it this morning and the first mile is OK, after that a tremendous racket that sounds like a flock of angry parakeets erupts from the device. Be it the cold or whatever, but the urethane roller was screeching along the metal pin that holds it on. I rode to work and it continued to get worse. By mile 3 I realized that the device had thrown my rear derailer alignment out of whack enough to start auto-shifting and not centering in the desired gear.

    At work I tried to fix it, but couldnt find an allen key the right size to take it off (I guess lesson #2 would be to bring special tools to remove or adjust new items on the first few rides). I limped back home with it on and listened to the angry parakeets while my bike kept doing this real neat upshift when I would stand up to pedal hard.

    As soon as I walked through the front door I took the POS off and tossed it in a corner.

    Hah, angry parakeets.

    Not lame. We all have to learn by effing up.

    After installing my fenders (rear isn't quick release) I can see that I'm going to get my ass handed to me when I get a rear flat.

  8. #8
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Don't try to trackstand at a traffic light unless you are really good at it AND really fast at clipping out. Yup...pretty damn embarrassing.

  9. #9
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    As I learned on my last commute on the 22nd of last month:

    Don't wear gloves that interfere with your feedback at the brake levers; it's not the flying endo that hurts, but that sudden stop at the end....
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  10. #10
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    I'm around a military base, so a majority of the traffic that I face on the way to/from work is fairly respectful. As a soldier myself, I know that on base we slow down for people running along the shoulders of the road, or a group of soldiers in formation. That same respect is carried over to off-post driving as well, for the most part anyways; not always.

    When I ride to work I can see that almost everyone gets over an entire lane, or they slow down significantly enough that I can hear their vehicle slowing down.

    If someone is close to me, or they cut me off, then I go about my business. I don't rarely acknowledge them because their actions aren't worth my energy. I obey the traffic rules like the cars have to, at busy intersections anyways, and give way to every car that is coming my way. They can kill me with their car if they don't see me!

  11. #11
    me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bo55Diesel

    On the flip side, jerks that are uncourteous sometimes get a little bird action. If I am riding in the city and catch them at a stop somewhere I give them a water bottle squirt to the window. I probably shouldn't do stuff like that, but I get heated sometimes.
    I am quite the opposite. Good people get a kind open hand wave. Jerks get a big thumbs up as a show of " Great job Einstein???".

  12. #12
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    I try and be as nice as I can to drivers. I will wave them past if I have a free lane, will let them go first at lights and wave if I see them waiting for me at a stop sign.

  13. #13
    I Ride for Donuts
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    last week I learned that all 10 of my fingers actually turn into thumbs when changing a tube in single digit temperatures in the dark.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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