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  1. #1
    Wearin down the sideknobs
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    If you haven't said "wow" today...

    ...I have a question just for you.


    Would a 10" bungee cord hooked to saddle rails and routed beneath a seatpost rack increase the carrying potential of said seatpost rack?

    I'm happy with my seatpost rack in the commuter role and now I want to take it touring. It's a Topeak MTX rated for 20 lbs. You can guess from the question that I'm a cheapskate (a/k/a married with a 10 month-old). If I'm barking up the wrong tree at least use your time, while on this topic, to help me come up with creative ways to extend the usefulness of this rack and not just shoot it down out of laziness.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRXPilot
    Would a 10" bungee cord hooked to saddle rails and routed beneath a seatpost rack increase the carrying potential of said seatpost rack?
    technically, maybe.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  3. #3
    nathan bay
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    If that is the same one I had it will hold more than it is rated for. If it's the one that takes the trunk bag and you want my unused trunk bag I'll send it to you. free..since you are a cheapskate.

  4. #4
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    1. 20 lb weight limit was a number engineers were comfortable commiting to lawyers on. (Actual load capacity will be higher...probably 25%?)

    2. If you are looking to carry 50 lbs, you have to look at the physics of having that much weight suspended on a lever the length of that beam. (Gravity..it's not just a good idea, it's the LAW)

    3. How fond are you of having your rack spin you around in your saddle?

    4. Seatpost racks have their place, just not for touring. Once you buy a proper touring rack (frame mount), your seatpost rack is relegated to a role on your backup bike, a friends bike, or your wife's bike. (My experience)

    all FWIW...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dir-T's Avatar
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    A friend of mine used to ride with a seatpost rack for mtb trips. It eventually broke, not because he exceeded the weight limit but because the constant bouncing/vibrating made the rack crack right at the mount. I doubt an elastic bungee would prevent that because it would stretch as the rack flexed.

    I think you may be onto something but you need to use something that is rigid and won't stretch.

  6. #6
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    It seems that if you were going to do that, you wouldn't want a bungee cord. If you want to create an extra support the closest alternative would be rope. It could be tied to length, and would support at least some extra load. It seems a bungee would just stretch, and could never become the load bearing member you are looking for.

    I'm with you on the cheap alternatives. If it works, use it.

  7. #7
    Wearin down the sideknobs
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    See, now I'm smelling the creative smoke. I like rope but it's got to somehow be quick release-ish. I was at Homer Depot this afternoon and came up with 15 ways to make it super strong, but nothing to keep the quick release of the original rack.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    Oh just buy a real rack.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Oh just buy a real rack.
    AMEN, brother

  10. #10
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
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    i love my rack!



    cant say the same for no quick release......
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  11. #11
    Recreational Racer
    Reputation: Jvan_wert's Avatar
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    Home Depot? Quick release? okay here is what you do.
    1. go back to home depot
    2. buy some steel cable ( it's in the hardware section by the chain and rope.
    3. buy some swedges or swags for said cable
    4. buy a small turn buckle for said cable
    alright after the shopping is done figure out the length of the cable that you need to go all the way around the rack and and seat rails. subtract the length of the turn buckle. add an inch or two to each end for a swagged loop. put it all together and use the turn buckle to take up the slack. the turn buckle should have an eyelet on one end and a hook on the other. wala you have a rack support. now go to the store and pick up a twelve pack of beer and a box of diapers. Strap down load with bungee cord and test it out. If it work great have a seat, admire your work, have a beer, change a diaper.
    “Let me 'splain. No, there is too much. Let me sum up.”

  12. #12
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
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    has anyone done that before , if so got pics?
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  13. #13
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    Here you go:



    Middle of the page:
    http://www.mcmaster.com/#cable-clevises/=18o1fi

    You can use that as your "Quick Release" because it unscrews pretty easily. Run your cable or rope to the "D" part. That way, all you have to do to attach it is put the shackle in place.

  14. #14
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    Ditto on the "don't use a bungee" comment. To really increase the carrying capacity, you need a rigid line, cable, or similar.

    That said, I wouldn't do it. In addition to trying to get too much out of your rack, you're now putting at least half of that weight way higher up on the seat post (pulling back and down on the rear of your seat...this means more stress on the seatpost and frame at the seat clamp area.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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