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Thread: IF you could...

  1. #1
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    IF you could...

    ...what kind of new (commuter) bike would you go out and buy right now and why? Cost doesn't matter, just curious to see which bikes people would pick. If you'd rather have an older bike that's cool too.

    As for me, I love the way the Specialized Vienna Deluxe 3 looks, and it comes with fenders, internal hub, chainguard, rack and generator hub stock, so not a whole lot to worry about. Plus, it looks really comfy to me.

    Thoughts?
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    Last edited by m121038; 11-15-2008 at 06:52 PM.

  2. #2
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    http://www.ecovelo.info/2008/09/26/moots-comooter

    moots comooter


    its a bargain at 8750.00

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    You rather put a velcro on your pants, than paying the extra labor to the mecanic that will work on your bike with this chain guard...

    the hub generator makes extra friction that you need to compensate with your legs muscles...

    Specialized often uses some non-standard components of their own design to oblige you to their brand. What happens if you need a back order part?

    Commuter bikes should offer an option of higher handle bar than this. Some people want to be seated to have a better view, this one is a bit down foreward. This fork is already cut when you buy the bike, so extras will apply if you want a higher handle bar &/or a different stem.

    The only company I know who is really on the spot for perfect comfort case by case with best quality/price ratio, is Velocycle: http://www.velocycle.com, this is my opinion, I ride 5 different of their bikes, & I would not ride any other now.

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    ...what kind of new (commuter) bike would you go out and buy right now and why?
    A blue one!




    Ok, j/k, I would build up a custom Soma Smoothie ES at sub-18 pounds (before accessories). Open Pro Ceramics, etc. I like 'em fast.

    Next year I *am* getting the Smoothie ES frame and the IRD Mosaic fork... the fancy parts kit will have to come more gradually however

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    Thanks for the feedback, checking them out now

    Honestly I don't know too much about bikes (hence seeing what people would want) so I appreciate that, I didn't know Specialized used many non-standard parts.

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    Alright, I'll admit that I'm more of a sucker for a bike's color than anything else...

    yellowboy: Just a bit curious, but which bikes do you have? I browsed through their online catalog but didn't see too many different cycles. I like the "a la carte" option, it definitely seems the way to go. The prices were a lot lower than I expected though, any way to find out more about them short of going to Canada?

  7. #7
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowboy
    You rather put a velcro on your pants, than paying the extra labor to the mecanic that will work on your bike with this chain guard...

    the hub generator makes extra friction that you need to compensate with your legs muscles...

    Specialized often uses some non-standard components of their own design to oblige you to their brand. What happens if you need a back order part?

    Commuter bikes should offer an option of higher handle bar than this. Some people want to be seated to have a better view, this one is a bit down foreward. This fork is already cut when you buy the bike, so extras will apply if you want a higher handle bar &/or a different stem.

    The only company I know who is really on the spot for perfect comfort case by case with best quality/price ratio, is Velocycle: http://www.velocycle.com, this is my opinion, I ride 5 different of their bikes, & I would not ride any other now.
    Sheesh! Everybody has different wants and needs the good thing is that there are plenty of choices for all of us!
    Chain guards: take three hours to remove? It`s no big deal, if you want one get one.
    Dyno hubs: Not nearly as inefficient as they used to be. With the light off, you`d never know you were spinning the magnets. They are a fool-proof, always available, no need to plan ahead option. I`ve had one for about 18 months and I`m sold for life.
    Specialized nonstandard components. Bummer, but it`s part of life- they are certainly not the only ones who play that game (Cannondale, Rivendell, Santana...)

    My dream commuter would be one of Sacha White`s creations. Maybe an IG version of this one:


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    A serious man.
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    http://www.scottusa.com/us_en/produc...1719/scale_ltd

    This will be my dream bike for commuting. Change it to slick and it will be Fast and furious. Help me save a lot of travelling time with it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BEETROOT
    took the words right out of my mouth

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    Wouldn't use it everyday, but if cost didn't matter I'd have one of these in my collection.

  12. #12
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    I'm a pretty simple guy so I wouldn't want anything considered "boutique" or outside the norm. Ever since the Specialized Crosstrail came out, I've been attracted to it.

    I'd add a rigid fork, upgrade the components, and of course throw on all of the best commuter goodies and accessories...nice light system and racks, mounted camera, air horn, self-inflatable tires, oil slick and mini-missle launchers!!!
    Eat to Live...not the other way around

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    Heh... a german hub dynamo w/ blinding LED headlight from Peter White for my daily driver would cost about the same as a surly steamroller complete for a lightweight alternative to my existing 2 bikes.

    But $$ be damned, a big dummy would be the answer for me, and that would probably not reduce the average weight of my little fleet.

  14. #14
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    Salsa Ala Carte with high-pressure-capable 1.5 slicks and a good set of full-wrap fenders.

    Last edited by carbuncle; 11-17-2008 at 06:22 AM.

  15. #15
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    Since we're dealing in 'what-if' here....

    2006 Schwinn SS DBX w/ Thudbuster ST post. Less than 24lb, disc brakes, and the required cush for my bad back. Liked the Scott SUB series, but they don't have enough top tube.... Redline's 'cross bike w/ disc tabs would be another choice, again w/ the Thud.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  16. #16
    ride like you stole it
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    Bakfiets all the way. Not very practical for a full on commuter but It'd be awesome for when I go running errands.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  17. #17
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    I have been drooling over the Gary Fisher Mendota lately and also the Giant Seek 1

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    i would most likely build up a Surly, i really like the way they look and i think the steel frame would give a nice ride

  19. #19
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    The Moots gets my vote


  20. #20
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    That Vanilla, but with discs and maybe an 8 speed IG hub.

    Or anything custom.

    But then I'd have to start wondering why my nicest bike is a commuter build exclusively. I'd want to ride it all of the time!

    So I'd get a custom monstercross/adventure tourer 29er, much like the new Salsa Fargo. But custom. I like what I've seen of Signal Cycle' stuff, so maybe I'd try and get them to do it.

  21. #21
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    It's really nice to own a top-dollar commuter- but I have lost too many already. Thieves will NEVER pass a chance to grab a nice commuter......locked or not. Why do you think Pawn Shops have all the sweet commuter bikes? In fact, I have always found a better commuter at Pawn Shops, while searching for my stolen one. I repeated this pattern over and over until I realized I was crapping up a tree(and I live in affluent Fremont, CA!). The day I got a cheap commuter- was the day nobody wanted to steal it. Who wants to steal a double-locked Roadmaster? I hate riding the bike, but it got me to my job for many months, without incident. I don't care what bike you ride- there is ALWAYS someone else casing your ride out, for that day they finally make their move.

    Commuter bikes lost to theft:

    1) Trek Soho - Someone used liquid nitrogen and destroyed the combo number pads, to grab this bike- my all-time favorite.
    2) Electra Townie - Two dopers cut the bike rack, to this bike. Witnesses saw them circling the bike and called cops....when cops arrived, they were GONE.
    3) Cannondale Comfort 700 - Chained this to a thin steel parking sign. Thief bent the sign over, and slid locked bike away.
    4) Gary Fisher Zebrano - Another victim of quick hands, and bolt cutters.

    Bike thieves will PASS on cheap bikes, securely locked. But they will take the TIME to creatively get a high-end bike, at all costs.
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 11-17-2008 at 12:57 PM.
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

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    I'd keep my Cross Check, with a few modifications. I think the complete build is already close to a perfect commuter. Once you add lights, racks, fenders, and panniers, you're almost done.

    The only major change I'd make is weld in some disc tabs to the frame and fork.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    It's really nice to own a top-dollar commuter- but I have lost too many already. Thieves will NEVER pass a chance to grab a nice commuter......locked or not. Why do think Pawn Shops have all the sweet commuter bikes? In fact, I have always found a better commuter at Pawn Shops, while searching for my stolen one. I repeated this pattern over and over until I realized I was crapping up a tree(and I live in affluent Fremont, CA!). The day I got a cheap commuter, was the day nobody wanted to steal it. Who wants to steal a double-locked Roadmaster? I hate riding the bike- but it got me to my job for many months, without incident. I don't care what bike you ride- there is ALWAYS someone else casing your ride out, for that day they finally make their move.

    Commuter bikes lost to theft:

    1) Trek Solo - Someone used liquid nitrogen and destroyed the combo number pads, to grab this bike- my all-time favorite.
    2) Electra Townie - Two dopers cut the bike rack, to this bike. Witnesses saw them circling the bike and called cops....when cops arrived, they were GONE.
    3) Cannondale Comfort 700 - Chained this to a thin steel parking sign. Thief bent the sign over, and slid locked bike away.
    4) Gary Fisher Zebrano - Another victim of quick hands, and bolt cutters.

    Bike thieves will PASS on cheap bikes, securely locked. But they will take the TIME to creatively get a high-end bike, at all costs.
    Excellent point. I have heard about people getting quality fitting frames and so on and scuffing them up and re-painting them or trashing them to look like junk (scuffing name-brands off cranks & components, etc.). I have a trek Soho that I sort of hold my breath about too. I love to ride it, but I know it is definitely a target. You could probably get creative and even re-brand a nice bike with huffy stickers or something after the scuff n paint.. that is if you ride more for utility than appearance.

  24. #24
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    id go with a new van dessel country road bob...great tire clearance, disc brakes and SS, what more do you need...plus its soooo purdy

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    A Cheap One

    I agree that a nice commuter bike is a target for thieves, and I'd rather spare myself the anxiety, heartache and cost of losing a bike I really cared about. I'm constantly on the lookout for cheap ($100 or less) bikes that I can use around town. Right now I have a cool old Cannondale that I bought used and have commuted on all summer and fall. I have toyed with the idea of buying a newer, nicer bike (maybe like a Fisher Mendota) and using it when I am not going to be leaving it unattended for hours, but for right now, my cheap bike works fine.
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    $ no object

    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Sheesh! Everybody has different wants and needs the good thing is that there are plenty of choices for all of us!
    Chain guards: take three hours to remove? It`s no big deal, if you want one get one.
    Dyno hubs: Not nearly as inefficient as they used to be. With the light off, you`d never know you were spinning the magnets. They are a fool-proof, always available, no need to plan ahead option. I`ve had one for about 18 months and I`m sold for life.
    Specialized nonstandard components. Bummer, but it`s part of life- they are certainly not the only ones who play that game (Cannondale, Rivendell, Santana...)

    My dream commuter would be one of Sacha White`s creations. Maybe an IG version of this one:


    winner

    otherwise my ibis hakkalugi is pretty perfect. needs some walnut fenders

  27. #27
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    ... and if we just ...

    Specialized nonstandard components. Bummer, but it`s part of life?

    No way!

    I have traveled with my Velocycle bike all over the world I asked just for the fun of it, if the bike shops I bumped into had some components for my bike, & they all had some in stock according to my bike's specs sizes...

    Velocycle bikes use the most standard size parts available, therefor, there are no reason why a company like Spcialized or Cannondale or any others who invent parts sizes for nothing, can get my business!

    Getting your bike custom built according to your particular case, & not paying more than any other brand, is really the way to go in my point of view...& the only guys I know who can do this at this point, is Velocycle in St-jean-sur-richelieu in Quebec, Canada: http://www.velocycle.com/index.php?s...x=11&langue=en

  28. #28
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    yellowboy... can you contribute anything that doesn't mention velocycle?
    You have 11 posts so far and every single one of them has a link to that website.

    No offense mate, but it looks a bit suspect.

  29. #29
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    I completely understand the philosophy behind commuting on a junker...but those things just won't stand up to me anymore! Part of my job a few years ago was setting up an outdoor (locked) display of bikes that W-M wanted to 'blow out'. When about five sold in a month, they told us to clear it away, so we had to re-hang all the bikes in the ceiling. The 'good' part was, they were all outside, and could be taken in the building at the opposite end of the parking lot. The bad part was, when I when to pedal the first one, the stamped steel chainrings skipped a complete half-revolution of the pedals! 'Bout lost a gonad that day....

    Had a rigid Huffy that I started to commute on, back in 2000...it was 3 years old by then, so quality was 'a touch higher' than today. But that Huffy would fold under me today, too. I'll risk riding some good stuff, just so I CAN ride.

    Then, too, I can take my bike inside with me....
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  30. #30
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    Yeah, I guess the theft aspect gets to be important in a lot of areas. I`m very lucky in that respect- I just leave my commuter leaning against the back wall unlocked at home and a cable lock around the TT at work. I had one bike stolen from me, and it was probably the only "nice" bike I`ve ever had. It was a two month old Univega Sportour (12 speed!) that I left locked outside the bowling alley when I was in high school. Before I left the bowling alley, I got picked up for some teenage idiot stuff, spent a weekend in our local kiddie jail and a week of house arrest and when I was done with THAT, the bike was gone. Go figure.

  31. #31
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    I miss my old Schwinn Sierra. It was a 94 and it was that point when Schwinn just started to reinvent themselves to get good (before Pacific got them). Though it was an MTB, it was a dang light cro-mo frame with and those old Scott AT-3 bars were great, even if they did look a little crazy. I road that thing over lots of Colorado winter and summer for the better part of two years and have never been as comfortable on the road and mountain on the same bike ever since.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
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  32. #32
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    No hesitation... I'd go right back out and buy another Surly Cross-Check, and a rack to go with it.

  33. #33
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    +1 for the Soma Smoothie ES

    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon
    A blue one!




    Ok, j/k, I would build up a custom Soma Smoothie ES at sub-18 pounds (before accessories). Open Pro Ceramics, etc. I like 'em fast.

    Next year I *am* getting the Smoothie ES frame and the IRD Mosaic fork... the fancy parts kit will have to come more gradually however

    I own a Soma Smoothie ES and I use it for commuting. It's stable, smooth, comfortable, and fast. It has room for fairly wide tires and fenders. It's a lot of fun to ride!

    Bike Setup:
    Soma Smoothie ES 64cm frame
    Bontrager Satellite Plus fork
    Shimano Ultegra 10 speed with long-cage GS rear derailleur and 12-27 cassette
    Shimano FC-R700 compact 34-50 double crankset
    Shimano BR-R650 brake calipers
    Hand-built wheels with 32 hole Mavic T520 rims
    Fizik Aliante Gamma saddle
    Speedplay Frog pedals
    Louis Garneau MTB shoes
    Last edited by ab138501; 12-26-2009 at 08:55 PM.

  34. #34
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Rather than get a sweet bike, I want a 20 mile tight and twisty single track loop put in, with a huge climb and overlook for the ride home. Then I could just have a 'cog and probably be happier.

  35. #35
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    I think I'll add "theft no object" to "cost no object," since given that theft is an issue in Seattle, I can't see commuting on anything nicer than my old Raleigh.

    If I weren't worried about theft, I'd want one of the following...
    Trek Portland
    That disc-brake LeMond
    the Salsa road/cross/disc frame

    If cost and theft are an issue but I was less broke, maybe the Kona Dew Drop.

    I'd want to add full fenders and a light rack to any of the above.

    A commuter is anything you commute on - some people may want a comfortable bike with high handle bars. I want a fast, fun, sporty bike that's more forgiving of bad weather, rough roads, and carrying my hand tools. Something just a little more comfortable than my 23mm-tired racing bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  36. #36
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    I really like blacksheep bikes:

    http://www.blacksheepbikes.com/

    the EON, Speedster, stellar would be awesome.

    On a more attainable note I'd love to have a tricross, or an old Ti GT Xizang.

  37. #37
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    Well, Ilive in Toronto, so theft is always an issue... So is crap weather and salted roads n the winter. So I'd stick with the new 29er version of my current beater/errand/commuter bike - the Kona Smoke. Its heavy, ugly, but comfortable, cheap and reliable.

    If I though theft was no issue, then I'd get a custom bike built up from Retrotec, or maybe True North (local)...

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ab138501
    I own a Soma Smoothie ES and I use it for commuting. It's stable, smooth, comfortable, and fast. It has room for fairly wide tires and fenders. It's a lot of fun to ride!

    Bike Setup:
    Soma Smoothie ES 64cm frame
    Bontrager Satellite Plus fork
    Shimano Ultegra 10 speed with long-cage GS rear derailleur and 12-27 cassette
    Shimano FC-R700 compact 34-50 double crankset
    Shimano BR-R650 brake calipers
    Hand-built wheels with 32 hole Mavic T520 rims
    Fizik Aliante Gamma saddle
    Speedplay Frog pedals
    Louis Garneau MTB shoes
    I did eventually get my Smoothie ES too (but a silver one, not a blue one ).

    58cm frame
    IRD Mosaic 57 carbon fork
    Random mix of 9-speed Shimano stuff
    Mavic Open Pro rims on Ultegra hubs
    Shimano SPD pedals for commuting

    Our climate's not very rainy, so I ditch the fenders in the summer and put on some light tires. In terms of speed, it's within shouting distance of my raceday bike, but much more versatile. I don't feel guilty if this one gets a little dirty or gets a few paint chips, unlike my race bike It's not a great sprinter, but cruises nicely.





    It's also got a better visibility solution, which is nice for those after-work training rides. Silver reflective tape blends reasonably well with the paint:


  39. #39
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    Oh man, that Blck Sheep "play" BMX Crusier is the best looking bike I've ever seen.
    C'mon Megaball. That Moots would have my feet rubbing the front hub on every turn.

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