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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm I need some cheap ways to stay warm.

    Ok I usually keep my ridding to the warmer weather, I think the colddest I rod in was 55 degrees. Iv been itching to go for a blast throught the city and down the trails but with the chance of me getting laid of soon im tring to use what i got and buy as little and as cheap as possible. I need advice from head to toe. I dont have clip pedals so i ussually ride with regular sneakers so I need to know socks what kind and how many. I have them mechanic gloves but i dont think they wil keep my hands warms and what should i wear for pants and shirt jacket ect. ? I also need somthing for my face.
    I search the site but there is so much on here I couldent find excatly what I was looking for.
    I would appreciate any input you guys have.


    Thanks
    Jeff

  2. #2
    BIKE!!
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    Three Cheap Ideas

    For your feet:

    Use a zip-lock bag or a plastic shopping bag. Stick your foot (w/ sock) in the bag and then into the shoe. You could cut off the overhang if there is a lot (depends on size of bag). It does work very well instead of buying booties.

    For your head:

    Cut of the sleeve of an old t-shirt. Where that on your head under your helmet. It keeps your ears warm and still allows some of the heat to vent out through the top.

    For your hands:

    Wal-Mart has neopreme ice fishing gloves in the fishing section. They are under 10 bucks and work great!

    Hope the ideas help a bit. Most of the cycling gear is well worth the money though once you save up!

  3. #3
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    My experience has been the gear that was designed for the purpose works best. Check out the online retailers. They always have closeouts on warm gear.

    PS, Your grammar was painful to read!
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  4. #4
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by WolfmansBrother8
    Hope the ideas help a bit. Most of the cycling gear is well worth the money though once you save up!
    Thanks for the helpfull info

    Quote Originally Posted by pop_martian
    My experience has been the gear that was designed for the purpose works best. Check out the online retailers. They always have closeouts on warm gear.

    PS, Your grammar was painful to read!
    Thanks Im not sure if its somthing i want to do all the time. If I enjoy it and get pepole to ride with me the I will buy better stuff later.
    I am very smart but also lazy so when i post from my cell it gets ugly some times



    Anybody else have some input. I need away to keep my face warm.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjeffa
    Thanks for the helpfull info


    Thanks Im not sure if its somthing i want to do all the time. If I enjoy it and get pepole to ride with me the I will buy better stuff later.
    I am very smart but also lazy so when i post from my cell it gets ugly some times



    Anybody else have some input. I need away to keep my face warm.
    I use one of these on the coldest of days, such as today where it was in the twenties for my commute. I am sure you could find cheaper ones as well. REI had some for as cheap as 15 dollars.
    http://www.rei.com/product/632422
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  6. #6
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    A few more:

    Insert a layer of newspaper over your chest, between the topmost and next layer. You can remove it if you get too hot, but it helps cut the wind and cold.

    Get some cheap wool gloves at a department store (less than $5), and wear those under your other windproof gloves.

    Find some way to get a merino wool base layer next to your skin.

  7. #7
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    For Your Feet-

    Since you're not using clipless, the world's your oyster as far as footwear. Get a cheap pair of work boots (Goodwill, if nothing else) a size or so up from what you usually wear, to allow room for a heavy pair (or two) of wool (NOT cotton) socks.

    I usually wrap the front part of my foot with heavy-duty aluminum foil (over the socks). It stops the wind, and reflects a certain amount of heat back at your toes.

    Other than that, a set of polypro long underwear. If you keep your legs warm,the blood will still be warm when it reaches your feet. If you don't, the toes are gonna be complaining.

  8. #8
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    thanks for all the great info guys

  9. #9
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    If you have a good base, the rest doesn't matter as much. Get some thin wool/merino sweaters from Goodwill. Maybe some sort of tights to go under whatever pants you are wearing. Any windbreaker over this will keep the wind out. You can do this for very cheap.

    I wear a merino wool sweater, a thin pair of merino socks under knee high wool socks, tights, wool pants and a windbreaker. Found some cheap ski gloves and a thin hat. I'm toasty in this down to 15-20 degrees.

    Oh yea, and I grow a beard in the winter. Keeps my face nice and warm.
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  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjeffa
    Ok I usually keep my ridding to the warmer weather, I think the colddest I rod in was 55 degrees.
    55 Fahrenheit? I think that is cool enough to put on a long sleeved shirt. Maybe cover your legs too.

    How "cold" are you thinking you might try?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfmansBrother8

    Cut of the sleeve of an old t-shirt. Where that on your head under your helmet. It keeps your ears warm and still allows some of the heat to vent out through the top.

    :

    I wouldn't try that with a cotton t-shirt. If you sweat like me, it will be soaked after a good climb and then you'll freeze. Polyester would be oK, or if you don't sweat then you might get away with cotton.

  12. #12
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    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  13. #13
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    I used the following coupon for Sports Authority on a Canari Windbreaker. $15 for a cycling specific jacket is a great deal. Fits nicely and keeps me warm (but I haven't ridden under 48 degrees yet). The windbreaker isn't shown on-line, but my store had a few in stock.

    http://forums.slickdeals.net/showthr...id=0&t=1056939

    The $10 Champion C9 wicking shirts from Target work great as a base layer, then a wool sweater under the jacket and you'd be nice and toasty.

  14. #14
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    Yeah, 55F had me wondering that, too; last winter, my coldest commute was -5F. Hurt a little....

    Hunting socks. Long johns, pref. polypropylene. Microfiber or microfleece balaclava & winter cap. Regular winter gloves, thinsulate works well.

    All of this can be had at Wal-Fart; the big trick is LAYERING!
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  15. #15
    ...from parts unknown
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    55 is cold!!!???.

    For cheap gloves, try waterproof or chemical resistant work gloves. The coating will stop the wind (and rain), and if you size them a tad large, you can wear some cheap liner gloves inside them.
    The inexpensive clear cycling raincoats (Garneau, Giordana, etc.) will add a lot of warm at minimal cost.
    You don't need a lot of insulation, the main thing is to stop wind penetration. Once you stop the wind, the body heat you are generating combined with a suitable amount of insulation will keep you warm. In many cases preventing overheating while cold/cool weather cycling is more of an issue than staying warm. As always, stay away from cotton, stick with synthetics or wool.
    As a somewhat biased(!) retailer, I would recommend sticking with cycling or cool weather aerobic activity clothing as much as practical/affordable.

  16. #16
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    Pedal faster... it helps me an its 10 below. Oh and a sh!t load of clothes.
    If it ain't broken... why the hell you fixin it!

    KONA rules!!

    If you miss the tranny... don't look down.

  17. #17
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    I think he said the coldest he has rode in so far is 55, but he is looking to ride at colder temps like we have right now.


    FWIW, This is what I have been using. I dont really see the need in cutting corners a great deal on this stuff as most of it can be had cheap. Either you wear what you would typically wear outside in the winter and dont worry about it, or you buy cycling specific gear.

    This is my setup, most of it was purchased very cheaply. This is what I wore today in 20 degree temps on my 3 mile commute and I was toasty:

    Performance brand century jacket: I use this as an outer shell. it is wind and water resistant, plus it is high-vis. I bought it on sale for about 27$ or so. It is a light jacket... nothing more than a windbreaker.

    under the jacket I wear a sweatshirt of some type, under that I wore a long-sleeve T shirt today, and my base layer was nothing more than a regular T-shirt.

    For pants I use bluejeans. Thats it. If it is really really cold I throw long johns or thermals on under the jeans. Today with the windchill in the teens I rode in plain old bluejeans and my legs werent overly cold.

    Hands I use a pair of endura gloves I got on sale for 25$, they are cycling specific, but I would assume ANY nice thinsulated glove will work here as long as it keeps the wind off. Mittens work best, but you can get creative and experiment.

    Feet I wore plain old white athletic socks, my nike MTB shoes, and some Avenir booties over them. I got the booties for 20$ shipped from fleabay and they are just simple neoprene jobs but they keep my feet warm. Since you are using standard pedals footwear can really be anything you want- snow boots, work boots, whatever, thick socks, no socks- you decide.

    Head: I have a 10$ balaclava that I bought from performance or nashbar (cant remember). It works fine if it is REALLY cold. I didnt need it today. I simply wore a regular old sock-cap, adjusted my helmet out larger and used it under there. My face was fine for the three mile jaunt. If you have longer to go any sort of skimask or balaclava will do.

    As you can see there really isnt much black magic here, its mostly just common items that anyone would use or have access to. I have a total of 82$ invested in the cycling-specific stuff I just mentioned and except for the booties there isnt much there that cant be found in the "civilian" market.

  18. #18
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    Tons of good ideas here:
    http://www.icebike.org/

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Tons of good ideas here:
    http://www.icebike.org/

    Awesome site, thanks for posting! that part about knowing "how much is enough" is dead-on. that method of measurement is pretty much what I do each morning but I hadnt explicitly read about it before. First thing when I go outside I can tell if I am layered too light or heavy by how I feel. If I am chilly in my mid-section immediately I need to add something else, if I am warm and comfy just standing around, I will be an easy-bake oven soon and need to shed something. If I am just warm enough to KNOW and maybe even feel slightly that it is definitely cold outside, I am good to go and that little bit of chill will be shaken off by my cardio.

  20. #20
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    Try thrift stores. It might take some digging, but good gear can be had for very small money (I scored a very well made wool baclava this afternoon at Thrift Town for four bucks.) Consider hitting some estate sales and watch your local craigslist. Good luck....

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    55 Fahrenheit? I think that is cool enough to put on a long sleeved shirt. Maybe cover your legs too.

    How "cold" are you thinking you might try?
    No it's not. 55F isn't cold. It's 20 degrees out and I haven't even started rocking pants. Knickers and tall socks. Long sleeve base layer, coat, hat, lobster gloves, Lake MXZ302. I ride in -30F. I ride in whatever temperature it gets down to. I have to. Cars are for the weak and selfish.

  22. #22
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    How long is your commute? I tried the plastic bag trick and after a bit of time, I ended up with a plastic bag full of water around my feet, which made them colder. I'd try finding thin wool socks and use multiple layers. If you get shoes, get some that are a size larger than you normally wear so that they are comfortable when you add extra socks

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjeffa
    Ok I usually keep my ridding to the warmer weather, I think the colddest I rod in was 55 degrees. Iv been itching to go for a blast throught the city and down the trails but with the chance of me getting laid of soon im tring to use what i got and buy as little and as cheap as possible. I need advice from head to toe. I dont have clip pedals so i ussually ride with regular sneakers so I need to know socks what kind and how many. I have them mechanic gloves but i dont think they wil keep my hands warms and what should i wear for pants and shirt jacket ect. ? I also need somthing for my face.
    I search the site but there is so much on here I couldent find excatly what I was looking for.
    I would appreciate any input you guys have.


    Thanks
    Jeff

    Here are some things I use.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1

    For base layers, I just go to Target or Kohls and buy their cheap poly pro stuff. Target also does some cheap 1/4 zip poly pro and fleece stuff that works well for a middle layer. For your outer layer I would suggest buying something decent. I recently bought a jacket made by Lou at Foxwear. Here is the link www.foxwear.net The jacket is very nice. and keeps me pretty darn warm, I used it the other day in 10F with two layers and was pretty happy. The material on the sides is breathable and at times I was a bit cold from those vents, but that could be solved by throwing a wind proof vest over top of the jacket. Overall I am very happy with the product, and Lou was awesome to deal with.

    For Gloves, I suggest either going with Gore Bike wear, or go back to Cabelas and buy some gortex gloves with Thinsulate lining. I have no association to Cabelas except they started in Nebraska and I have a huge store located about 50mi from my house.

    For foot wear, you are way better off then those of us who use clipless. Just use something with stiff sole. I like to use two or three socks if my shoes will accept that much insulation.

    For legs, you can pick up some cheap wind breaker pants at most sporting good stores, or use polypro insulation long johns under normal jeans. Again, Cabelas carries the polortec stuff and a cheaper brand called MTP that I was issued when I was in the military. The MTP stuff works well.

    NO COTTON anywhere on your body.

    Wool, is great but pricey. Poly pro stuff will stink when saturated with sweat, but if you have provisions to shower at work or your coworkers don't notice then you are cool.

    I hope that helps.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfmansBrother8
    For your feet:
    For your hands:

    Wal-Mart has neopreme ice fishing gloves in the fishing section. They are under 10 bucks and work great!
    :
    Thanks for the tip on the gloves, I'm always needing a few pair and these look great for some of the cold, long rides to come this winter.
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  25. #25
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    I agree, stay away from the cotton! Polyester is good and cheap, try a cruise through the thrift stores or the VV, they usually have some sporty stuff that works for biking. I picked up some GoreTex pants for $10 at the VV, they're the best for rain! All my winter commuting stuff was bought on the cheap except my coat, it is waterproof, windproof and has great venting (cuffs, pits, back). One problem you don't want to have is getting too warm, then sweating and freezing.
    For under my helmet I picked up a thin Louis Garneau polyester balaclava ($15 or so), haven't been cold yet (I wear 2 of em when it's real cold)
    Another big factor is length of commute, my first winter was an hour, my feet felt like bricks when I got to work. Now I switch to platform pedals and wear a pair of short boots with a thin felt liner when it's real cold (+5F is my limit), they work great!
    My commute now is a half hour, hardly on the bike long enough to get cold!!

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