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  1. #10976
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Nice pic CB.

    Rodar if the TSA throws your ass in jail because your lost patch kit is still in your pannier and accidentally take the flammable glue through security your on your own buddy

    Nice train pic Jordy. I never get tired of trains.

  2. #10977
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Wonder if my wife "put away" my patching bottle in some obscure location after I left it out?

    Will the tube from any aerosol lube or cleaner fit into a chain lube bottle?

    Talk about thinking the cup is half full...

    The patch kit will only turn up after the little bottle is broken, and the glue has hardened....

    What ever little tube you find.....will not fit.

  3. #10978
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    Woodway,

    Yes, it is that Blue Diamond. These trails are about ten miles from my house. I suspect I should ride my bike to the trailhead from my house, but I never do. I despise riding streets on my mountain bikes. Only dirt riding for them. Every Saturday morning I catch the sunrise on those big, red mountains in the pic you posted. If you hit the trail from Blue Diamond, three miles later you'll be in front of and fairly close to these mountains. A glorious site to be sure.

    Found the perfect fix to the seat post rack. I removed it and loaded up a backpack. Part of the problem I was having with the rack is that I tightened it so hard it bent the heck out of my seat post. Not being able to buy a new and better seat post until the weekend, I decided to give the backpack a try. If this works out, I won't even replace the seat post, as I was able to pound it back to a doable position. If I'm going to keep with the rack, I'll need a stronger post that can actually take a little tightening force.

    Commute in okay and commute home less than okay, all because of my rack slanting down and rubbing on the back tire over every medium sized bump. Very, very annoying. Gotta say, though, my bike sure looks zippy with just a headlight and taillight and I'm really looking forward to tomorrow's ride. I figure I can absorb the extra weight of the back pack and especially so since I'm down thirty pounds since starting this commuting thing.

    Sorry about the flats, Rodar. Flat week was last week for me.

  4. #10979
    Squeaky Wheel
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    vegascruiser - I've ridden the Blue Diamond trails (Cottonwood Canyon?) twice. That photo is my wife when we were out there this past January. Rented a bike from the little bike shop in Blue Diamond (nice guy who runs that shop) and just headed out and had fun. Great trails for sure and really a different sort of riding than we get up here in the Pacific Northwest. I can see why you like riding them so much.

    I tried a backpack when I first started commuting but after about a month I was sick of it. My commute is longer than many at 36 miles RT and after a week of wearing that backpack I was really feeling it. I would think that in the vegas heat you'll be feeling it too, but everyone is different in that regard.

  5. #10980
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    vegascruiser - I've ridden the Blue Diamond trails (Cottonwood Canyon?) twice. That photo is my wife when we were out there this past January. Rented a bike from the little bike shop in Blue Diamond (nice guy who runs that shop) and just headed out and had fun. Great trails for sure and really a different sort of riding than we get up here in the Pacific Northwest. I can see why you like riding them so much.

    I tried a backpack when I first started commuting but after about a month I was sick of it. My commute is longer than many at 36 miles RT and after a week of wearing that backpack I was really feeling it. I would think that in the vegas heat you'll be feeling it too, but everyone is different in that regard.
    Yep. Cottonwood Canyon, Redrock, Blue Diamond--basically all the same thing. I've been told there's about 150 miles of trails in the area, though I usually stick to my familiar thirty to forty miles. I do 95% of my riding alone out there, as most of my buddies who do/will ride don't do so very often. The guy at the bike shop is named Chris and he's a really nice for sure. Got some really cold days out there this past January and I can even remember my water bottle spout freezing over on several weekends. Boy would I love to ride the Pacific Northwest. Bet it's beautiful.

    I'm thinking the backpack might suck, but with the hot season winding down it might be doable. I think I'm going to like the clutter-free feeling of a bike with no panniers. The backpack will likely hamper my ability to transport critters home for the kids though. But my wife has put her foot down on the critters now anyway.

  6. #10981
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    The patch kit will only turn up after the little bottle is broken, and the glue has hardened....

    What ever little tube you find.....will not fit.
    I supspect you`re right with your first prediction. The second one I thought would be wrong, but it`s looking better for you than for me- brought home three different tubes from aerosol cans at work, all different sizes, and all of them too big!

    Woodway, I`ll have a patch kit in my checked luggage one way or the other. If the TSA guys try to confiscate it, I`ll whoop out a contraband Dasani bottle and threaten to start drowning people

    I wore backpacks for my first few years of MTBing. Found a way to avoid them and have been much happier without. That said, they do work, and are always an option. In fact, I hear that Jeep driving cyclists even PREFER backpacks! But they`re all whackos
    Recalculating....

  7. #10982
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    Quote Originally Posted by vegascruiser View Post
    ... I suspect I should ride my bike to the trailhead from my house, but I never do. I despise riding streets on my mountain bikes. Only dirt riding for them. ...
    That would kill me, I'm the opposite, I despise driving the mountain bikes anywhere I could ride to in under 1/2 hour.

    I got up early to ride into work in the rain, in the dark, with my wife.

  8. #10983
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    Good ride in today. Perfect weather. Starting to get dark/cold enough in the mornings to have me thinking about where my arm warmers and lights are though :-/
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  9. #10984
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    I busted out the arm warmers this week myself. Still in shorts, with no headlight....but it's coming.

    Backpack all the way! I hate stuff hanging off of the bike. A water bottle cage is a huge decision for me. Don't like going there. I'll take a sweaty back any day. Once you have racks and panniers and seat bags and what-not hanging off of the bike, you can't ride it like it was meant to be ridden. That's my theory at least.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  10. #10985
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    A water bottle cage is a huge decision for me. ..., you can't ride it like it was meant to be ridden. That's my theory at least.
    Really watch a UCI XC moutain bike race they all use water bottles and cages..

    I use the water bottle and cage for up to a hard 11/2 hour ride.

    Anything longer I need a fill up place or a camel back.

  11. #10986
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    Took yesterday off from work and the bike - have a nasty chest and head cold and it was my birthday, so I thought if I'm gonna feel like crap on my birthday I'm gonna stay in bed. It was a nice change of pace.

    Back on the bike today. 42 degrees this AM. Calm as can be. The ride was slow and painful with my lungs feeling like I am a smoker again. Not fun. My wife is just getting over her bout with the crud, so I figure I have a few more days before I'm completely clear.

    In the past I've used backpacks for the commute, but have been using panniers for the last year or so. I like the panniers, though I'll be going back to the backpack at least on Fridays, so I can make the commute for my teaching gig with my laptop. I don't trust panniers enough to put anything valuable and breakable in them. I've broken too many of them in the short time I've been using them.

    I agree that using a backpack rather than panniers does allow one to ride a bit more aggressively, if the desire should hit. I've ridden a lot of singletrack over the winter with my panniers attached, but in the summer when the trails are rooty and rocky, I tend to either avoid them or ride so gingerly so as to not destroy the panniers, that I might as well have not ridden the single track at all. Though, be careful with a backpack on single track as I have gotten it caught on a tree branch before and gotten pulled off the bike. Like a cartoon.

    Picture from my Friday ride: How was your commute today?-9681095004_ca518a1eb4_b.jpg

    How was your commute today?-9677889233_f29f0612fa_b.jpg

  12. #10987
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I busted out the arm warmers this week myself. Still in shorts, with no headlight....but it's coming.

    Backpack all the way! I hate stuff hanging off of the bike. A water bottle cage is a huge decision for me. Don't like going there. I'll take a sweaty back any day. Once you have racks and panniers and seat bags and what-not hanging off of the bike, you can't ride it like it was meant to be ridden. That's my theory at least.
    I completely agree with this. I have a couple of backpacks that have breathable pads that kind of help. Those are both tactical "bug out" or daypacks. They are meant for all day wear and are quite comfy if you fit them correctly. Plus they hold enough food for the day, med pack, change of clothes (my whole camo uniform and boots fit), 3L of water, bike pump, tube, tools, and you wont even notice it after a while.

    This is also an excellent way to lose weight lol. Ive been getting used to the trail bike the past couple of days and the 35ish pound bike really gives me a workout!

  13. #10988
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Really watch a UCI XC moutain bike race they all use water bottles and cages.
    Good for them

    I have bottle/cage, and I do use them occasionally...more typically on the road when I forego bringing tools, etc. For MTB I have the camelbak stocked with a tube, tire levers, multitool, pump, and water. Just would much rather have all that lashed to my back than dangling on the bike.

    I can see just packing a bottle in a race situation and just not bringing the tools and what-not.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  14. #10989
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryptoroxx View Post
    I have a couple of backpacks that have breathable pads that kind of help.
    This statement makes me wonder about the Osprey packs with internal frames and a mesh that holds the pack completely away from your back. Does anybody here ride with something like that? I have a crush on Osprey products, used to fondle them up in REI and trip out on the lightness. It`s like holding a hologram- you can SEE it in your hands, but they have no discernable weight, whooooaa! Now I`m careful to avoid that part of the store because I`m afraid one will follow me home even though I really have no use for it.
    Recalculating....

  15. #10990
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    Nothing on the back unless I have to. Frame bag all the way, or other bike packing gear. I dont have to carry much, lunch, phone, wallet, occasional beer. Never going back! ;p

  16. #10991
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    If I need to pack heavy on my MTB for a family ride or the like I'll wear my Osprey day pack (Stratos 36 I think). The suspension is amazing for keeping the load from sagging awkwardly or poking into my back. I don't have any distinct memories of feeling a breeze on my back, but I also don't think my back was covered in sweat either. It's been a while. My regular pack is a Raptor 10, which has no suspension and leaves my back quite sweaty.

  17. #10992
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    Re: How was your commute today?

    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    This statement makes me wonder about the Osprey packs with internal frames and a mesh that holds the pack completely away from your back. Does anybody here ride with something like that? I have a crush on Osprey products, used to fondle them up in REI and trip out on the lightness. It`s like holding a hologram- you can SEE it in your hands, but they have no discernable weight, whooooaa! Now I`m careful to avoid that part of the store because I`m afraid one will follow me home even though I really have no use for it.
    Took a look at their pack tech. I would say that their packs would be superior to what I wear for moisture wicking/breathability as mine are more bulletproof and then made comfortable lol. They definitely look pretty sturdy for their fabric selection. I would think they are a good hiker/biker pack.





    Beamed from my dumbphone

  18. #10993
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    Passed a dead raccoon that was the size of a small bear cub. The sucker must have been 40-50lbs.

  19. #10994
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Passed a dead raccoon that was the size of a small bear cub. The sucker must have been 40-50lbs.
    You passed it? I would've thought that qualified as supper!

    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    This statement makes me wonder about the Osprey packs with internal frames and a mesh that holds the pack completely away from your back. Does anybody here ride with something like that? I have a crush on Osprey products, used to fondle them up in REI and trip out on the lightness. It`s like holding a hologram- you can SEE it in your hands, but they have no discernable weight, whooooaa! Now I`m careful to avoid that part of the store because I`m afraid one will follow me home even though I really have no use for it.
    Mine has the mesh and the first winter I noticed it was downright chilly on my back, so you know it works in summer. Mine is discontinued but they still use the mesh on some. The pad things are not nearly as good. One is airscape one is airspeed, I forget which is which.

    Frost warnings here at the campground tonight, good thing I brought the dog.

  20. #10995
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    Too greasy. Besides, I first noticed it a few days ago. Aged beef is good, 3 day old sun cured raccoon road kill, not so much.

  21. #10996
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    I am mixed on the backpack but will stick with it for now. I am determined to make this work. One mistake I made last night was tossing everything from my panniers into my backpack. Got into work nicely and barely noticed the pack was there (down hill ride and 75F). Ride home pretty much sucked. In the hundreds and all uphill. However, immediately upon getting home I lightened my load. Stuck my tool bag under my seat, threw the hand pump from my mountain bike into the pack (had a foot pump in my pannier), and wrapped my chain and lock around my frame. Saw no reason to carry bungees without panniers--so out they went. Threw away two Clif bars that expired in the spring. Instead of sockets and a ratchet, went with one crescent wrench (trail tools make no sense on a Walmart bike). Instead of two extra tubes, I'll roll with one--beside, got an extra tube in my locker at work anyway. In this fashion, I was able to weed a lot of weight from my backpack. I am really digging the clutter free feeling my bike has now and the sudden ability to bunny hop curbs if the desire arises. I have to admit, my style of riding before was often based on babying my panniers.

  22. #10997
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    This statement makes me wonder about the Osprey packs with internal frames and a mesh that holds the pack completely away from your back. Does anybody here ride with something like that? I have a crush on Osprey products, used to fondle them up in REI and trip out on the lightness. It`s like holding a hologram- you can SEE it in your hands, but they have no discernable weight, whooooaa! Now I`m careful to avoid that part of the store because I`m afraid one will follow me home even though I really have no use for it.
    I have two of that style pack. I have an Osprey Atmos 65 that I use for backpacking, internal frame with the mesh back so you get lots of air flow. Helps keep your back cool quite a bit. I also have a 30L pack I commute with. It's REI brand, forget the model, but I really like it a lot. I will commute with it no matter how hot it gets. Sure my back gets sweaty, but it does with no backpack too. I would take pictures of the packs but I'm at the coffee shop right now and don't have them with me. If I think of it tonight I will.

  23. #10998
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    Hurrah. The ride in this morning was slightly off best marks but, thanks to my new Marathon Plus rear tire, puncture and leak-free! It has been a real chore keeping air in the rear tire with all the glass and other nastiness out there on the highway median.

    Bike Ride Profile | 49miles near St. Francisville | Times and Records | Strava

    The Schwalbe is definitely a little draggy (It's 800 grams, after all) but I am loving the certainty.

  24. #10999
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    I saw this on my ride to work this morning. Pretty cool...

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How was your commute today?-deer-3.jpg  

    Last edited by JChasse; 09-09-2013 at 11:22 AM.

  25. #11000
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    That is pretty cool. What keeps them in the pen? It looks like they could hop over it like it wasn't there.

    Speaking of pretty cool, winter is coming. It was right around 40 this morning. I've had mid-winter rides that were warmer.

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