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  1. #8201
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    Pretty easy to take the pogies on and off. It is only too warm for me usually on the way home, partly because it is all uphill. I usually just ride with my hands out of the pogies in the middle of the bars and hope I don't need the brakes.

  2. #8202
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    ^^ Yeah, only about 5 secs to get the pogies off, just loosen a spring cordlock thingy that snugs it to the bar & pull off. Maybe 10 secs to get on, just because you have to make sure it slips over the trigger shifters. Ok, if you only used them 10x, saving 10 fingers each time, that would only be like a dollar a finger, or something like that. But seriously, I would be surprised at anyone who tried them and didn't use them more often than that.

  3. #8203
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    Double commute for me today, since I've got a moderately sick puppy at home who could use an extra bathroom break.

    So after about 3 weeks of solid -15C temperatures, we're finally back around freezing for a little while. So a nice warm, slushy, mucky day, and my lunchhour ride was my first commute with daylight in...a month or so? Good stuff.

  4. #8204
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    "sick as a dog" didn't become common nomenclature for nothin'.

    On the pogies... I'm pretty happy with the Lobsters down to low single digits...and we don't go below zero for more than a few days in a typical winter.... what is the temp range that the pogies are 'comfortable' for most folks? (I seem to have good circulation or something, because lots of people complain about the PI Lobsters down around the teens, but I don't get tingly with them until 7 or 8 degrees F)
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  5. #8205
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    started packing up to head to Indy for the holidays. planning to do the Polar Bear ride with the mayor on Jan 5 on my commuter.
    I wondered how nutsy it would be to commute in just to do that ride. A 2 hour round trip to clebrate bicycle commuting.

    I put a congrats on the defense thread. You are now a certified expert on the thesis topic. Love the glimpse of beaver tail and later confirmation that is what had wandered by the video trap. Nice for wild pigs to come by and make it 'boaring'. Love how the armadillos take their own path.


    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I had taken off the pogies because they'll be too hot this afternoon in the 40's, even without gloves.
    The Bar Mitts aren't that warm. 40 F with fingerless gloves isn't too hot.

    BrianMc

  6. #8206
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    A lot of sucking and heavy breathing this morning. Threw on a new chain last night, the old one measured due but not overdue, and of course it worked perfectly in the stand but chainsuck hit before I even left my yard. Thinking maybe I had not effectively removed the factory grease & relubed, I went back in for a touch up, but it did not really help. It worked fine in the middle ring, so I went with that the w**** way.
    Sounds like a stiff link. Usually the one you put back together if you used a chain tool. backpedal on the stand slowly and watch for one that doesn't straighten back out all the way. You take the factory lube off? I call that a maintenance free week.
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I tried out the Lizard Skins Blizzard (part neoprene but fleecy inside) gloves I got for 14.99 off gearscan and was pleasantly surprised that my hands were warm and dry. It was not a downpour, so I hesitate to call them waterproof, but pretty nice for a cold rain. I had taken off the pogies because they'll be too hot this afternoon in the 40's, even without gloves.
    I'm going to try to resist the urge to get those. My wife is OK with my buying a few bikes a year (29er due in Wed, obsessively checking Fedex tracking for updates, check) but my never ending quest for the perfect gloves.... I want to try pogies but I mentally have trouble spending the money they want for them for a folded piece of cloth with some Velcro. It's too bad too because my hands are cold a lot.

    My gear is just about dry from this morning. Time to go out and get soggy again.

  7. #8207
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    They were definitely both pissed. The first one because I didn't "respect his authority", because he was in the wrong. The second one because I started asking him about the laptop issue and that is a bit of a touchy subject since that officer ran down that pedestrian.

    Honestly they need some fire under their ass. Out of the 5 states and dozen cities I have lived in I have never seen such an ineffective police force. And, as far as I can seen most of them are clearly anti-bike. Out of the 7 times I have been hit, and one time I was assaulted by the diver after being hit, none of the cops have even been remotely helpful. And I have actually learned that they have broken protocol in a few cases. Don't get me wrong, I hate CM too, but if you can't help a guy that is just trying to get home from work then what good are you.

    I have actually been thinking about organizing a protest or something but with my temper and mentality can't see it going well.


    Oh dude, some of the bus drivers are terrible. I constantly have issues with them buzzing me, or pulling into the bike lane RIGHT in front of me, or riding my ass (and even honking at me).

    I actually got in a yelling match with a driver one morning. I was going straight through a light and for some reason the driver thought it was a good idea to pull up along side me, in the left lane, then try to take a right with me in the way. I hit my zound and he stopped but as I passed he threw open his little slider and let loose. Sometimes this city is unbelievable.
    How do you like the Zound?

    This looks pretty cool: Loud Bicycle: Car horns for cyclists by Jonathan Lansey — Kickstarter
    Work to Ride - Ride to Work
    There's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing...

  8. #8208
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post

    I'm going to try to resist the urge to get those. My wife is OK with my buying a few bikes a year (29er due in Wed, obsessively checking Fedex tracking for updates, check) but my never ending quest for the perfect gloves.... I want to try pogies but I mentally have trouble spending the money they want for them for a folded piece of cloth with some Velcro. It's too bad too because my hands are cold a lot.
    If your hands are cold, you should like them. I like them because I don't like the feel that I get with thick gloves, so I can use a much thinner glove, fingerless, or none at all under the pogies. I use bar mitts usually, and also have an older pair of Maddens that are fleece lined.

  9. #8209
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I wondered how nutsy it would be to commute in just to do that ride. A 2 hour round trip to clebrate bicycle commuting.

    I put a congrats on the defense thread. You are now a certified expert on the thesis topic. Love the glimpse of beaver tail and later confirmation that is what had wandered by the video trap. Nice for wild pigs to come by and make it 'boaring'. Love how the armadillos take their own path.
    LOL, a 2 hour trip to ride 10 miles. sounds like an efficient plan.

  10. #8210
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    In one word: cold. Was 8f when I rolled this morning. New neoprene gloves were great except they don't breathe so one ends up with damp gloves for the ride home, but the hands were toasty. I haven't ridden knobby tires on pavement for a very long time and it took some getting used to them and the studs, my speed is definitely slower but I'll get used to it soon enough. Looking forward to really needing the tires.

  11. #8211
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    mtbxplorer: Maybe something for next year?

    Most Radical set up CB, Post'em up here!

    Presents issues in locking up the bike. though.

    BrianMc

  12. #8212
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    mtbxplorer: Maybe something for next year?

    Most Radical set up CB, Post'em up here!
    BrianMc
    Boat-towing is pretty cool, but I don't know that I could get mine back uphill to my house. If they opened that nearby reservoir to boats I might be tempted to try.

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    what is the temp range that the pogies are 'comfortable' for most folks?
    I use mine from about freezing down to -10F, just changing if I wear a glove, or what glove I wear inside them. I have the dogwood designs regulars, but they make a more insulated version for Alaskan expeditions at -40, etc. From your glove descriptions, I'm guessing you wouldn't want them until the 20's maybe.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I wondered how nutsy it would be to commute in just to do that ride. A 2 hour round trip to clebrate bicycle commuting. BrianMc
    I saw some coverage last year of that ride, which was on a real cold day. Loved this pic of a woman in her 70's, I think I posted it over in the WL.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  13. #8213
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    Another great commute today. A balmy 26 F when I left home. The snow we got over the weekend has not really set up yet as the temps are a bit warm yet, so it was still soft and the perfect surface for the fatty. The sky was overcast so I didn't even have to use my headlight other than on the lowest setting to let other cyclists see me coming at them. A great ride.

  14. #8214
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    I honestly have no memory of the actual riding part of my last couple commutes...got a new audiobook
    Holy cow...I'm here already?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #8215
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    New bike is here! Technically I could ride it home but I'll take some time to set it up for me. So I guess it will ride home with the wife. I got a hold of the owner of the LBS that just closed and picked up a pair of 9er Gazza Extreme 294s that will be going on soon. I've got a busy night tonight but hopefully I can take it tomorrow since it's suppose to freeze up tonight.

    Oh, and the commute was fine Raining to start but cleared by about 1/2 way.

    What format do you get your audio books in? That might be different for the more boring winter road commutes.

  16. #8216
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    This was an MP3 download... usually just get them on iTunes, so they're mp3 or m4b or whatever they call their audiobooks... I learned that if you download an mp3 file and just re-name it "m4b", iTunes will put it in the audiobook section.

    I've gotten a few from library websites too... sometimes you can just download audiobooks for free, just like checking out a book from the library.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  17. #8217
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    Melted snow from yesterday's rain is now ice on pavement ! Lucky not much, only small patches here and there, but at least nothing wet ! Save the chain, ride the ice !

    I'm more concerned with driver's loosing control and hitting me than me crashing ahah
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  18. #8218
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    ^^I'm an audiobook addict, and I get most of them online from the library. You download a free overdrive media software via the library site, and then you can check out books in either WMA or mp3 format. The WMAs take up less room. So you download the book from the website to your computer and then using the overdrive software, transfer it to your ipod. I don't try to concentrate on a story on the bike, but I love them for yardwork, painting, driving, housecleaning, etc. I can even plug the ipod into some special hearing protectors to listen while mowing. You can get an even better selecction if you have a friend with a library card from another system.

  19. #8219
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    My library system doesn't do WMA and the stupid, stupid overdrive software doesn't like my Android phone for MP3s. I'd even be willing to install some Overdrive software on my phone to make it happen, but no dice.

  20. #8220
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    Going to work this morning was perfectly pleasant, temp was ~18F and my feet were a little chilly but not to bad overall.

    The way home was rather eventful. Watched a bozo in a Jeep Wrangler rear and some poor folks in a mini van waiting to turn left on a side street and then another mile down the road I got my first "gay" shout from some classless individual in an SUV.

  21. #8221
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    My daily commute is ~4.5 miles there and 5.5 miles home. Longer coming back to avoid climbing the steeper streets. The morning has me descending ~500 feet and climbing less than 100.

    Today I had a pedal come apart on the downhill. Glad I did not have to climb that way. was able to fix it for the ride home.

    Around 30F AM and 38F PM today. Not bad. New tires arrived to get me through the coming snow and ice.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  22. #8222
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    ^ I've got a newish cartridge bearing pedal that got crunchy last friday, so I took it apart to service it and found that the nut on the end of the spindle is stripped. I can't tighten it, but I also can't get it off, so now I can't get the spindle out. I put some grease in, closed everything up, and the crunchiness was gone and it spins fine. But in the back of my mind I'm wondering if/when whatever is left of the nut is going to pack it in, and the pedal will come flying off the spindle.

  23. #8223
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    It was nice out when I got up, but the wind has picked up since sundown. Check of the forecast looks like it`s a wet storm comming in- probably not much snow, but I`m sure it`ll be icy for a few days. Since I just finished repairing the damage from last week`s black ice incedent, I guess I ought to stud up tonight.

    My books are still paperback. They go well with my quill stems and canti brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    New bike is here! Technically I could ride it home but I'll take some time to set it up for me.
    Yeah! So, it came in pretty much assembled? My last new bike did- honestly it took some of the fun out of the deal, but it WAS nice to be able to ride within minutes and not go scrounging for all the little miscelaneous stuff that I wouldn`t have thought to have on hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Today I had a pedal come apart on the downhill. Glad I did not have to climb that way. was able to fix it for the ride home.
    Sounds like it could have been painfull!

    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ I've got a newish cartridge bearing pedal that got crunchy last friday, so I took it apart to service it and found that the nut on the end of the spindle is stripped. I can't tighten it, but I also can't get it off, so now I can't get the spindle out. I put some grease in, closed everything up, and the crunchiness was gone and it spins fine. But in the back of my mind I'm wondering if/when whatever is left of the nut is going to pack it in, and the pedal will come flying off the spindle.
    I have a pedal in that condition on my folder. In hindsight, I`m pretty sure I stripped the left handed threads by torquing the crap out of it while trying to get it apart- it wasn`t easy! In my defense, I have other pedals of the same brand/different model that use right handed threads on both sides with a Nylock. I`ve taken those apart many times to regrease the "nonserviceable" bearings over the past five years or so, and thought they`d be the same. Maybe not, though.
    Recalculating....

  24. #8224
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I have a pedal in that condition on my folder. In hindsight, I`m pretty sure I stripped the left handed threads by torquing the crap out of it while trying to get it apart- it wasn`t easy!
    Is that actually a thing? I'd wondered about that the first time I took apart a cartridge pedal, but have only seen the nylock ones. This pedal is drive-side, so normal thread where it connects to the crank, which I guess would mean reverse-thread on the spindle end if I'm getting my rotation torques right?

    Anyway, this one apparently came pre-stripped from the store/factory. I think it's over a year old, but it barely has any miles on it, which is annoying.

  25. #8225
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    Good commute

    Was a little nippy for Phoenix area at 34 F. But I passed the 3000 mile mark for the year on the way home which made the day extra special !

  26. #8226
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    I used to never use lights or anything, I dont know if it was wanting to be incognito or just the "bike lights are lame" thought, but getting a bit older, sort of have more sense to use lights. Will never wear a reflective vest though
    First bicycle commute in a few weeks today, felt pretty good, a bit chilly though

  27. #8227
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    Way to go, Slopro

    Newf, you got me to thinking about that danged pedal again, so I googled around and found this:
    Do you ever clean and lube pedals? [Archive] - Bike Forums
    I thought it was interresting, but it doesn`t seem universal. In my case, both sets of pedals are Wellgo pinned platforms, both have bushings on the "inboard" and and tiny cartridge ball bearings on the "outboard" end. The older pedals have locknuts and both nuts are definitley RH for both pedals. The newer ones may or may not use locknuts (don`t remember offhand), but I betcha one of them had LH threads (which of them that was also escapes my memory right now). Since I can get aftermarket fancy-schmancy spindles for that model for about the same price as a new pair of pedals, I`ll probably try to drill off the end of the spindle the next time they start clicking on me, then order new spindles if the operation succeeds.
    Recalculating....

  28. #8228
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    A bit icy, has me wanting for snow for sure. I took a trail down some old railroad tracks on my way home yesterday that dropped me off a few blocks down of where I usually cross. The crossing guard for the school stopped me to talk, an older lady who has lived here (Berlin NH) all of her life. Just couldn't believe that I ride every day, couldn't believe that I do it in the snow, couldn't believe that I can ride my bike back up the street I live on (steep). "good for you" she says "you must have some good legs". I told her I cant believe that she can stand out in the cold holding a sign, at least I am moving! I'm particularly fond of the older generation anyway, but she is a good one.

  29. #8229
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottg07 View Post
    I used to never use lights or anything, I dont know if it was wanting to be incognito or just the "bike lights are lame" thought, but getting a bit older, sort of have more sense to use lights. Will never wear a reflective vest though
    First bicycle commute in a few weeks today, felt pretty good, a bit chilly though
    I thought that way too for quite a while but finally decided I already look like a complete dork on the bike and a reflective vest isn't gonna make or break my fashion statement but it might keep me from getting completely destroyed by a semi-truck on a rural highway at 6:00am when it's still pitch black out.

  30. #8230
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Yeah! So, it came in pretty much assembled? My last new bike did- honestly it took some of the fun out of the deal, but it WAS nice to be able to ride within minutes and not go scrounging for all the little miscelaneous stuff that I wouldn`t have thought to have on hand.
    I actually sprung to have it built. Supposedly it was either that or having it "Professionally" assembled an a LBS or it would void the warranty. I wasn't' sure how many pieces it would be in if I didn't get it assembled. It was pretty much like any other bike I have bought off the internet. Needed to put on the wheels, handlebars & seat.

    I got to ride it in this morning on the dark trails. I can't help but feel like I'm riding a horse so I can't say I fell in love with the 9er on the first ride. And for some reason, despite way up in the air on those wagon wheels I bounced the peddles off more rocks today than in the last year. It might take some time to get to know each other.

    But it is purdy and shiny...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How was your commute today?-2012-12-12-07.23.09.jpg  

    How was your commute today?-2012-12-12-07.21.51.jpg  


  31. #8231
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottg07 View Post
    I used to never use lights or anything, I dont know if it was wanting to be incognito or just the "bike lights are lame" thought, but getting a bit older, sort of have more sense to use lights. Will never wear a reflective vest though
    First bicycle commute in a few weeks today, felt pretty good, a bit chilly though
    Got to have lights!! Especially of you are going to follow the proper rules of riding a bike with traffic. I got a Lazer Urbanizer helmet that has built in lights front and back which really increase my visibility. With the blinking lights on my bike as well, people sometimes think I'm a police officer, but I know that I'm seen!!!

  32. #8232
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    Looks fun bedwards!

    We were getting some wet snow when I went to bed, but it deteriorated to freezing rain at some point overnight, and then stopped... so a cold dry commute with some very slick roads this morning. This would have been a much more interesting post if I hadn't gotten the studs this year. I almost forgot I was riding in ice until I got the back wheel to slip a bit when I stood up on a climb.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  33. #8233
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMatson View Post
    I thought that way too for quite a while but finally decided I already look like a complete dork on the bike and a reflective vest isn't gonna make or break my fashion statement but it might keep me from getting completely destroyed by a semi-truck on a rural highway at 6:00am when it's still pitch black out.
    Pretty much. If you're wearing a helmet then you already look like a dork to 99% of the population. Might as well commit to it.

  34. #8234
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    In my case, both sets of pedals are Wellgo pinned platforms, both have bushings on the "inboard" and and tiny cartridge ball bearings on the "outboard" end. The older pedals have locknuts and both nuts are definitley RH for both pedals.
    Thanks for that link. From there it looks like if one side is going to be reverse threaded then it will be the driveside. These are wellgo knockoffs, and the other 2 or 3 I've serviced were wellgos too. Weird.

    I swore off the loose-ball pedals after I took one apart, and discovered that it didn't have lockwashers, so it was basically impossible to service all for the sake of saving a fraction of a cent on a washer. I even scavenged through the co-op's parts bins trying find a replacement but wasn't successful. Stupid pedals.

  35. #8235
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    Is it weird that I've never serviced a set of pedals? Granted, I've only been riding bikes seriously since the mid 80's...but I've never had one give me any trouble. I bought the pedals that are on my mountain bike in 1998, and other than moving them from bike to bike and adjusting the cleat tension, I've never touched them.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  36. #8236
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    Got fed up with not riding. Rode. Amazing how long it takes to get everything together again, and how oddly intimidated I was by riding to work when I've done it at least 100 times already. New goggles worked well, although I wimped out and wore sunglasses until I was off the road (and out of the public eye, for the most part). No wind applied to my eyes, but enough ventilation that there was no fog.

    Pretty sure the helmet's just for show at this point. It sits so high on my head with my hood up that I doubt it would do much if I crashed unless I pointed my head forward to ram it directly into whatever I hit, which doesn't sound like a great plan from a neck/spine perspective. Even with it "down" on my head I have doubts about how effective a normal bike helmet is in a crash. as the coverage on the front and sides seems minimal. The only time I ever had a big bike crash and needed the helmet (in the summer before 5th grade) I skipped/slid down the road on my face instead.

    Behold my dorky goggles:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How was your commute today?-img_20121212_105109.jpg  


  37. #8237
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    I always wear my dorky vest, almost always wear the dorky hat with it. Partly for saftey, but mostly just because I relish dorkiness

    Xplorer (no relation to afore mentioned dorkiness), did you get your chain suck fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Supposedly it was either that or having it "Professionally" assembled an a LBS or it would void the warranty.

    I can't help but feel like I'm riding a horse so I can't say I fell in love with the 9er on the first ride. And for some reason, despite way up in the air on those wagon wheels I bounced the peddles off more rocks today than in the last year.
    Can`t say as I blame the manufacturers for making the warranty dependent on a pro assembly. Do FS bikes usually have more pedal strike than HTs? I`m going to have to rent one one of these summers. And it looks like you went with a double crankset- smaller than a road compact though, isn`t it? Hope so!

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Is it weird that I've never serviced a set of pedals? Granted, I've only been riding bikes seriously since the mid 80's...but I've never had one give me any trouble.
    I guess you`re just lucky that way. I`ve never had any trouble with quill pedals (opened a few up just to see what they look like, and stuffed a little grease in while I was at it). had two pairs of CB Smarties (cheapo version of Candies) go to hell, couldn`t redo them for some forgotten reason. My first pair of Wellgos started clicking a few years after I bought them, grease quiets them up for about 6 months to a year per treatment. Several pairs of other BMX pedals have given me no troubles, but I don`t think I`ve put many miles on any of them.
    Recalculating....

  38. #8238
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    Sanath, I have that complaint about a lot of helmets too.. currently using a Bell Metro, and it seems to have better side/back coverage, and feels more like you're "in" it, rather than it just being "on top". When it gets really cold, I wear my snowboard helmet (that my wife made me buy after I broke my leg snowboarding...as if wearing a helmet is somehow going to keep me from breaking my leg again in the future). The snowboard helmet is warm, has very good coverage, has ear warming flaps that are removeable, and supposedly meets all of the same standards that bike helmets meet. It's a great alternative in the winter. Would work well with your dorky goggles too.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  39. #8239
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    Today was brutal. We got about 5 inches of fresh snow overnight with more on the way. I broke trail for 90% of my ride today. The snow was quite heavy and wet and even with the fatties aired way down, I was still floundering in some places - particularly where the trees had sluffed off. By my ride home tonight, there could be up to a foot of fresh snow. At least the temps are nice - upper 20's

  40. #8240
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Sanath, I have that complaint about a lot of helmets too.. currently using a Bell Metro, and it seems to have better side/back coverage, and feels more like you're "in" it, rather than it just being "on top". When it gets really cold, I wear my snowboard helmet (that my wife made me buy after I broke my leg snowboarding...as if wearing a helmet is somehow going to keep me from breaking my leg again in the future). The snowboard helmet is warm, has very good coverage, has ear warming flaps that are removeable, and supposedly meets all of the same standards that bike helmets meet. It's a great alternative in the winter. Would work well with your dorky goggles too.
    I'm trying to avoid spending $60 on a winter-specific helmet when I'm going to stop riding as soon as the snow/ice gets serious (if it ever does, at this rate). I was hoping to pick up one on clearance in the spring, for next year.

  41. #8241
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    But it is purdy and shiny...
    That is purdy! Enjoy! Which LBS closed?

    I dropped someone off at the airport this a.m. and did not do it on the bike. Also took her dog home for a week, so I'll be driving more so she's not home alone so long. Our upcoming holiday party also requires driving, so I'll be missing some bikecommutes, but should have some extra energy for some weekend rec rides with the dog.

    I have not taken a closer look at the chainsuck, but as luck would have it there is a drivetrain workshop tonight I was considering, so maybe it can be a patient there if there is room for me.

  42. #8242
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Can`t say as I blame the manufacturers for making the warranty dependent on a pro assembly. Do FS bikes usually have more pedal strike than HTs? I`m going to have to rent one one of these summers. And it looks like you went with a double crankset- smaller than a road compact though, isn`t it? Hope so!
    It is exactly the same bike as my other FS but in a 9er version. The other bike is still in the shop but when it comes out I'll have to check the clearance. It's a double and a 10 speed rear - my first. I didn't' run out of gears on my normal hilly route. Probably cause the cranks are so long

    MTXB, the one in Windham closed after 2 years. He's got piles of bike parts in TOTAL disarray that I'm pretty interested in.

    I've re-greased and tightened one set of pedals. Eventually the rivets were so loose I retired them.

    OK, I'll join in the dorky photo contest (should almost be it's own thread?) Actually, I look pretty cool
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How was your commute today?-bikedork.jpg  


  43. #8243
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    ^^ What is that face sheild? Link please? I like my 'clava, and I don't like those neoprene ski face shields, but it looks like that might be one I could live with. Does it go way down on the neck like a 'clava, or is that another item covering yer neck?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  44. #8244
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Is it weird that I've never serviced a set of pedals?
    This is the first time I've actually had pedals go crunchy bad...even though these barely had any miles on them. But it looks like some grease fixed them up...even if I'll never be able to fully service them.

    Last spring I just wanted to know how the cartridge pedals worked, so I took a few of mine apart to clean and regrease them. It's really easy, although after just looking at rebuild kits online, some driveside spindles are reverse-threaded and some aren't. That's ridiculous.

    And I've rebuilt a few ancient loose-bearing pedals at the co-op. It's insanely fiddly work, but weirdly satisfying. But because of that, once when I was trying to track down a mystery clicking noise I took apart a perfectly good set of loose-bearing pedals, only to discover that I'd never be able to readjust them again because they didn't have a lock washer. Stupid pedals.

  45. #8245
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    ^^ What is that face sheild? Link please? I like my 'clava, and I don't like those neoprene ski face shields, but it looks like that might be one I could live with. Does it go way down on the neck like a 'clava, or is that another item covering yer neck?
    The brand is Serius, I like it because it has closes with velcro on the back. I put it over my helmet straps and it doesn't feel like I'm wearing a neck brace like other clavas. This might be the same one but I can't tell if it pulls over or has velcro. I think they have them in EMS stores. I've got a similar one from Gator.

    The double pane glasses/goggles from Amazon are amazing. They just don't' fog.

  46. #8246
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    Pedals: I have relubed a number of them a number of times. The classic early 70's Campys are still going strong on the errand bike. The two-sided Wellgos took a hit in the accident. So I replaced them with Shimano PD A520 one siders. The Welgos can go back on for boots when the temps get there not too far from now.They have a click in them since they were 6 months old which comes and goes. Now hey are off I can hammer the one back into shape and fix the click.
    :
    Helmets and vests keep us differentiated from 7-11 hold-up people.

    Nice bike Bedwards. Replacing all the torn clothing and gear cost me a +1. Next Christmas.

    BrianMc

  47. #8247
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    Helmets and vests keep us differentiated from 7-11 hold-up people.
    Haha, I'd rather look like a dork than a criminal.

  48. #8248
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    Got a short 8 mile ride in today. I need to adjust the new pedals to the lowest clamp setting. The Soma New Xpress tires do ride smoother that Pasela Tourguards. I will up their pressure 5 pounds to increase the crispness of handling and get a bit more snakebite protection. The difference feels like I put on 35s. I found some nails in the area where I got flatted. Possible the sharp head of one did the damage. Possible thst a car bumped some out from the road edge. I will cut if wider, just in case.

    Only the gouged areas have scabs still. the left hand tyes better and no pain holding hte bar, but he knuckles are still a bit sore, the swelling is enough to keep the ring from coming off, and the purple color is still there if you compare to the right hand. The chest aches with each breath once I get aerobic. Whether a cracked rib or pectoral ligaments, it is on the decline. So now to build miles and speed back up.

    BrianMc

  49. #8249
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    Congrats on getting back out there, Brian. Smell the roses and take it easy for a bit, non need to rush. I will try to posrep you but I think its maxxed out.

  50. #8250
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    Ohoh, are we having a dockets helmet outfit contest ?

    If so, check mine out

    How was your commute today?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1355380331.079878.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

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