Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 185
  1. #1
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,055

    How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?

    Lets be honest, In spite of their speed (And stability at speed)Road bikes Ride like jackhammers and corner like cruise ships.

    Mountain bikes maneuver like... well, Mountain goats. and ride like sofa's.

    But the mountain bike is sluggish, Usually far too easy to spin gearing on and annoyingly heavy.

    So lets get theoretical, what's the best way to build something meant to go real fast on asphalt, that has enough of a contact patch with the road to cut a sharp turn at speed (without skidding out.) that offers a forgiving enough ride?

    My idea? Lightweight 29'er with cruiser slicks. probably rigid, with a road bike drive train.

    Something like the Niner EMD9.

    your thoughts?

    I'm guessing the Cross Check gets mentioned by the second reply.

  2. #2
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,803
    My friend bought one of these full carbon cross bikes. Light and fast, 34mm tires, and yes, he commutes on it.

    How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?-bianchicavaria-_sram_.jpg

    Cavaria | Bianchi USA

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    My friend bought one of these full carbon cross bikes. Light and fast, 34mm tires, and yes, he commutes on it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bianchiCavaria-_SRAM_.jpg 
Views:	14884 
Size:	94.4 KB 
ID:	777743

    Cavaria | Bianchi USA
    I expected something more exotic.

    Looks like a regular 10 speed road bike to me.

    Me and a buddy went on a mission to build hybrid road/mountain.

    We did this on the cheap and its turned out to be more fun than we ever imagined.

    Ok they are not 3 thousand dollar bikes but i have to tell you the level of fun surpassed what we expected.

    Ok so we ended up buying gt karakoram frames.
    A medium and a xl.

    Both 29er s

    Low down.

    We used 720 am bars with 1 and 2 in risers.
    8 speed cassettes, shimano and sram with hyperglide.
    Hallowtech cranks
    A slightly larger chain ring up front. Ended up with two chain rings up front.
    Pc 830 chains that we cut to exact length.
    X.4 shifters and derailuers with a long cage and swaped out pullys for sealed bearings.
    Sswaped out wheels for some dtswiss dh class
    Schwable marathon tyres at 35c up front and 40c on back because these are hardtails.
    We stuck with flat pedals and went with deity's
    We did buy some carbon seatposts but that all the carbon we used.
    Answer dj stems.
    Forks are x-fusion slide 29
    cane creek seal hed stak
    shimano external bb

    I gotta tell you guys. These bikes are kinda funny lookin but omg they are fun.
    we kept the old wheel set with kendas for off trail stuff but for the most part its been a blast, fast, smooth and we can pull off 30 miles rides like its nothing.

    Most fun i have had on bikes in like for ever.


    Total cost is around 1400.00

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    29

    Re: How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?

    This isn't a hard bike to find these days; you are basically looking for a common commuter. 29er is overkill, and about 35-40mm is fine. Steel is real.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Straz85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,331
    I'm not sure I understand the "corner like cruise ships" comment...my road bike will out corner my mountain bike or commuter (Cross Check) any day of the week....

  6. #6
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by Straz85 View Post
    I'm not sure I understand the "corner like cruise ships" comment...my road bike will out corner my mountain bike or commuter (Cross Check) any day of the week....
    I would agree. On asphalt my road bike will corner as good or better than my XC mountain bike with slicks.

  7. #7
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,055
    My EXISTING commuter is a rigid steel 26'er that comes in just over 26 pounds and rides on 2.15 Big Apples. And its not a bad bike. at all. I can hook a corner at relatively high speeds with it. It's just not a bike that particularly likes speed. When I've ridden road bikes with 28mm tires it always felt like the back end was trying to get away from me in sharp turns. more than once it actually slid out from under me.

    Mind you I am by no means "used to" a road bike. because every time I've ridden one I've found the ride too unforgiving.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    My EXISTING commuter is a rigid steel 26'er that comes in just over 26 pounds and rides on 2.15 Big Apples...
    My "speedy" bike is my rigid steel 26er with BAs. It feels speedy because it's a singlespeed that's geared pretty high, the bars are way below the saddle, and my other two bikes are pigs. So those are my simple suggestions - make yours an ss, play with the geo (maybe drop bars?), or just get a slower bike to make this one feel faster.

  9. #9
    sheep in FOX clothing
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,153
    On small low-frequency bumps typical of rough roads, my carbon mountain bike with 700x23C tires (and the fork locked out) rides harsher than my carbon road bike* on 700x23C tires.

    Not much harsher, but a bit.

    *Not actually mine

  10. #10
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,055
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    My "speedy" bike is my rigid steel 26er with BAs. It feels speedy because it's a singlespeed that's geared pretty high, the bars are way below the saddle, and my other two bikes are pigs. So those are my simple suggestions - make yours an ss, play with the geo (maybe drop bars?), or just get a slower bike to make this one feel faster.
    xD, Valid idea. I've played with drops on the soma before, but they've never felt right. right now its got a 660mm flat bar with virtually no rise. its still a bit tall but for the bike it feels like a good compromise. the biggest thing slowing my bike down is gearing... actually it's me. but after me it's gearing. But This bike is about to Become my girlfriends commuter. meaning I get a new bike. So... THE DREAMING BEGINS.

    *EDIT
    The reason it matters that it's going to be my girlfriends bike is the fact that she is very much a novice to the sport. so ease of fit and relaxing the handling are what matters most on it now.

  11. #11
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,260
    700c wheeled hybrid is it. Still wont be faster, or handle as well as a road bike. YMMV

  12. #12
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,443
    Drop bar 29er.
    Pick a 29er. Make it a road bike.

    I've done 2:



    How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?-picture1.jpg
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,351
    I was waiting for you, CB.

    On thing that I find, is that on a route with lots of stop-n-go I enjoy my 26ers. I notice the extra effort it takes to spin up my 29er (even though it has better wheels and tires than my 26ers), and that makes the 26ers feel zippier. That's a quirk of my typical commute though, where my longest run without stopping is half a mile, and there are plenty of spots where I have to stop every block.

  14. #14
    I Ride for Donuts
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,443
    ^^I only stop to take pictures
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    29

    Re: How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    My EXISTING commuter is a rigid steel 26'er that comes in just over 26 pounds and rides on 2.15 Big Apples. And its not a bad bike. at all. I can hook a corner at relatively high speeds with it. It's just not a bike that particularly likes speed. When I've ridden road bikes with 28mm tires it always felt like the back end was trying to get away from me in sharp turns. more than once it actually slid out from under me.

    Mind you I am by no means "used to" a road bike. because every time I've ridden one I've found the ride too unforgiving.
    Sounds like a really lousy set of tires. That's simply not normal.

  16. #16
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,055
    really? while I cant name the model of tires, I tried a bike with moderately worn Michelin's, fresh specializeds and sad bontragers.

    the specializeds were the best.

    I just... I want zoom zoom at this point! but more rally car zoom than ferrari zoom

    If that made any sense at all.

  17. #17
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,290
    I disagree with both parts of your opening line.

    As with mountain bikes, part of getting a good ride and traction out of a road bike is tuning tire pressure. My 'A' road bike gets 80 and 95. (23 mm tires.) My commuter gets 80 and 102. It has bigger tires, but I also carry a load on it and strap a couple locks to the rack, so I've sometimes had trouble with pinch flats on it, that I haven't had come up on the one I only ride for fun or training.

    I guess I'd also ask if you feel that jackhammer thing all the time, or just when you plow through a section of particularly bad pavement. As with mountain bikes, you need to post when the going gets rough.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
    A God Without A Name
    Reputation: Agwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,055
    because of my weight (260+) i tend to ride a bit higher in the pressures. I tend to inflate to MAX recommended PSI then back off till I find a sweet zone. for the one road bike I was on for more than an afternoon (The specialized... I want to say Roubaix? no idea.) I was at around 105 in the rear and 100 in the front. I don't remember his exact tire size. but I'd put it at around 28. not the stock rubbers but still specialized.

    with my weight pinch flats and torn casings tend to happen if I run at the pressures a 170 pound person does.

    With the roubaix, on the streets I commute (suburban and surface) that jackhammer was at the slightest bump. I always felt at the edge of control. I did check my fit on the bike, and while not ideal it was more than good enough to get an idea of it. my turning radius was enormous and traction was abysmal.

    so lets start with what I'd like. Lighter weight, tons of acceleration, turns on a dime. lets me haulass when I want to but rides smooth enough my wrists and posterior don't kill me 20 miles in.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    29

    Re: How do we build ourselves a fast road bike... that isn't a road bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    really?
    Yes, it really is not normal to have the back wheel skid out on every corner when running a road bike on asphalt. I would guess that given your weight, the tires were severely underinflated. (For 28s I'd start at about 130 pounds.) For a lower pressure you'd need a bigger tire (like the 35s I suggested earlier). For a built bike, look at something like the Jamis Bosanova. There's a good market these days for that sort of bike, with relaxed road geometry, ability to mount larger tires, fender & rack mounts, etc.--you're not really describing something novel. You'll generally find the manufacturers filing them under something like urban/commuter/multi-use.

  20. #20
    Squeaky Wheel
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,945
    Titanium Cross Bike. Goes fast, rugged but lightweight, disc brakes for wet weather, attachment points for all your commuting goodies.


  21. #21
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,178
    Seems to me like there are a lot of road bikes out there now that will take wider tires. I can fit 35's on my Casseroll, and that has regular road brakes (long reach).
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  22. #22
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,290
    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    because of my weight (260+) i tend to ride a bit higher in the pressures. I tend to inflate to MAX recommended PSI then back off till I find a sweet zone. for the one road bike I was on for more than an afternoon (The specialized... I want to say Roubaix? no idea.) I was at around 105 in the rear and 100 in the front. I don't remember his exact tire size. but I'd put it at around 28. not the stock rubbers but still specialized.

    with my weight pinch flats and torn casings tend to happen if I run at the pressures a 170 pound person does.

    With the roubaix, on the streets I commute (suburban and surface) that jackhammer was at the slightest bump. I always felt at the edge of control. I did check my fit on the bike, and while not ideal it was more than good enough to get an idea of it. my turning radius was enormous and traction was abysmal.

    so lets start with what I'd like. Lighter weight, tons of acceleration, turns on a dime. lets me haulass when I want to but rides smooth enough my wrists and posterior don't kill me 20 miles in.
    Don't you already have a road bike? I forget what it was...

    Anyway, IMO you need to keep going bigger on the tires until you find something big enough to let you use less than max pressure. I think you need to let go of "light" from the bike and understand that acceleration comes mostly from you, hauling ass comes mostly from you and also from getting you out of the wind, and handling comes to a large degree from you, but you need not to be fighting the bike.

    What's the biggest road tire you've tried? They're available up to 40 mm or so - touring tires at that point. They're not all "fast," but the truth is that it doesn't make all that much difference. The Schwalbe Marathon is popular with a lot of people. Looks like Maxxis goes pretty wide on some slick hybrid tires.

    The next problem is that you need a frame that clears them. You can do a 29er like CommuterBoy's, you can do a cyclocross or touring bike, you can do something from Rivendell, you get a couple options in Surly (Cross Check for a narrower tire and, supposedly, quicker-handling bike, LHT lets you go up to a 2.1" tire if you do the 26" version) the Salsa Fargo may have "Agwan" written all over it, I think Jamis has something... as vmps says, this is not such a rare type of bike.

    If I were having your problem with being able to get a smooth ride, what I'd be looking for is the ability to fit a big enough tire to use "my" pressure. What I'd be trying to keep from a road bike would be the drop bars - these are a big part of sustaining higher cruising speeds on the flats and also contribute to comfort on a longer ride and accelerations - and some aspects of the geometry, particularly a top tube length that plays well with drop bars, a steep head tube relative to a mountain bike (though it's really only about a degree) and a bit lower bottom bracket, again relative to a mountain bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,333
    The smoother ride is achieved with frame inserts Specialized calls them Zertz....I have riden a bike with them it was an older Tricross...

    Seems like this is the model nowadays.

    Specialized Bicycle Components

  24. #24
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,661
    I am a big fan of bikes that bend or break stereotypes.

    I have an On-One Pompetamine that is really a road bike that I built up with wheels durable enough for the trails (Shimano 29er - M529 or somesuch -specific hubs with bigger flanges for strength and reflective Velocity Dyad rims).

    DSCN2682

    It does handle like a road bike, though. Slow speed turns are not a strength. But if you lean into a turn with some speed, it'll carve. As pictured, it's got 32mm tires. I have 38's with more tread that I can put on it if I want. It's SS right now, but I'm considering making it 1x, maybe using an IGH for a new rear wheel build or putting a cassette and derailleur on it for a more traditional 1x build.

    I have fun with this bike. I don't have fun with it the same way I have fun with a mtb, though, so I don't want it to be one.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TwoHeadsBrewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,835
    I'll just throw another wrench into the mix based on some riding I've been doing lately. I'd like a bike that has an ~80mm suspension fork, a road bike like pedaling position, drop bars, and 700x32c tires. I'm sure I could build one up like this, but the pedaling position and efficiency is pretty important.

    The reason why is that there are several pavement/dirt road rides in my area that offer great fitness challenges. I've ridden them on the road bike but have to be really careful about pinch flats going down and end up with numb hands/feet on the fast dirt descents. On the flip side, I've taken my MTB up there which is fantastic on the dirt sections but a heavy tank and inefficient pedaling position on the road, plus non-aero position and low geared. A cross bike is not going to cut it, I basically have a cross bike now with 23c road tires on it.

    Here's one of those rides. About 50% nice pavement, 25% terrible pavement, and 25% dirt roads

    Honey Run -> Sawmill - > Centerville - A bike ride in Chico, California
    "Got everything you need?"

Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Wanting to build a cross bike from and older road bike?
    By Drummerboy1975 in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-15-2012, 03:56 PM
  2. How much fast will i be on a road bike?
    By gbowen444 in forum Commuting
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: 10-23-2012, 07:28 PM
  3. Mountain bike frame companies that build road frames
    By misctwo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 08-26-2011, 06:02 PM
  4. #23: Road bike for a fast mtb lady...
    By MDEnvEngr in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-19-2011, 08:56 PM
  5. New Bike for XC mountain biking, travel, off-road and road touring
    By wheels_replace_horses in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-29-2009, 07:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •