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  1. #1
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    Helmets Used More but Not Necessarily Helping


  2. #2
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    What they are comparing is number of brain injuries relative to percentage of people wearing helmets without relating it to the increase (if any) in the number of participants in these sports.

    Without knowing that number, there is no way to assess effectiveness. Brain injuries might increase 100% over a set time but if participants increased by 150% then helmets might be effective but outpaced slightly by faster, riskier behavior.

    Any way thanks for posting.

  3. #3
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    ^^ Here is that number, the skier visits (includes snowboarders) in the U.S. has gone down since 2003, the year compared in the article, so it doesn't look like an increase in participation explains the increased brain injuries.

    • United States: number of skier visits 2000-2013 | Statistic

  4. #4
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    Re: Helmets Used More but Not Necessarily Helping

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    ^^ Here is that number, the skier visits (includes snowboarders) in the U.S. has gone down since 2003, the year compared in the article, so it doesn't look like an increase in participation explains the increased brain injuries.

    • United States: number of skier visits 2000-2013 | Statistic
    Interesting. Thanks for the link.

  5. #5
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    The amount of people I see on bikes without helmets is mind numbing. I would say about 1 out of every 6 or 7 has a helmet on. Mostly guys, hardly ever women. I see a lot of bikers on campus, and I know that they are just going class to class, but it just shocks me to see them, and then on the sidewalk as well. Battling the foot traffic seems worse than the cars on the road.
    '13 FELT TK3 48:15
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  6. #6
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    To get a full understanding of the benefit (if any) of wearing a helmet, you need to look at each type, and speed of the injury or incident. I would wager that the increase in helmet wearing has also increased the amount of risk people will take. Wearing a helmet does not make you invincible.

  7. #7
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    The increase in helmet use has had positive results. Experts say helmets have reduced the numbers of less serious head injuries, like scalp lacerations, by 30 percent to 50 percent, and Schumacher’s doctors say he would not have survived his fall had he not worn a helmet. But growing evidence indicates that helmets do not prevent some more serious injuries, like the tearing of delicate brain tissue, said Jasper Shealy, a professor emeritus at Rochester Institute of Technology.
    I think this is pretty telling. So wearing a helmet doesn't necessarily eliminate all injury. It reduces some types of injuries. And for injuries that would result in more immediate death, they may be traded for something else.

    So the key is to look at the types of injuries sustained (with and without helmets), determine why those injuries are occurring, and then work to improve protective equipment. That's part of the idea behind the MIPS tech that's showing up in various helmets. Some folks found that helmets aren't protecting against certain types of injuries and did some tests to figure out what they could do. This article really only gives lip-service to MIPS tech.

    It goes into some detail regarding the rotational forces that cause many injuries to folks who are wearing helmets, but doesn't describe MIPS tech enough for people to realize that MIPS tech reduces those rotational forces enough to reduce injury occurrence.

    It's kindof a half-assed article on the topic, really.

  8. #8
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    Having sacrificed a helmet, having added some scars, and having saved my scalp, I am happy to wear one. I could have done without a concussion. though. No other vehicle, just me falling due to a front flat in a turn at about 19 mph. So it doesn't take much to exceed a cycling helmet's limits to protect us from serious brain injury.

    Head first at a car
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  9. #9
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    helmets are NOT designed to prevent brain injury. the are designed to keep your skull in one piece, to prevent death. I supposed "death" would be considered a severe brain injury, but anyone who things that wearing a helmet is going to prevent a concussion has been misinformed.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    It's kindof a half-assed article on the topic, really.
    Aren't all articles on this topic? people don't like wearing helmets, so when they see a click-bait article that says something negative about helmets, they jump on it and then feel good about themselves for engaging in risky behaviors without protection. one could make a fortune selling ads on sites with similar articles about condoms.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    helmets are NOT designed to prevent brain injury.
    Agreed. I regret that but I suspect my neck muscles won't support one that would.

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    the are designed to keep your skull in one piece, to prevent death. I supposed "death" would be considered a severe brain injury, but anyone who things that wearing a helmet is going to prevent a concussion has been misinformed.
    If a mere fall got my bell rung that well on a minor impact, split the helmet, and crushed the liner, then my point is the helmet is useless for even moderate impacts and brain death is highly likely if you don't tuck and roll but go headfirst into an oncoming motor vehicle. So no, I don't think they are up to stopping brain death in even moderate collisions, or my little incident would not have done that much damage to my helmet or me. Still happy to have a normal head of hair, or waht p[asses for one at my age.

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