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  1. #1
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    Helmet mirror with an mtb twist

    First off, a disclaimer because I'm talking about a company my son just started. I'm hopping around all my favorite spots on the web to help spread the word...

    That said, go check out rvgbike(dot)com or Rearview Gear on FB.

    It's just now hitting the market, but we've been testing these since last fall. It's a killer design. What makes it cool for mtb'ers is the detachable mount. Literally, ride across town to get to the trailhead, pop it off and shove it in your pocket, ride some trail, then pop it back on when you head home. It uses a spoke for an arm, like the classic Chuck Harris mirrors and other variants, so it has no joints like all the plastic ones that are a PIA. And I've tried them all. The "don't have to readjust it" part is the clincher. Well, after the "take it off and put it back without missing a pedal stroke" part.

    He sells regular black ones on the site as well as whatever custom colors or decals they have made up at the time. They'll also make one with your logo or decal, but that's option's not on the website yet so you'd have to email them. They're on ebay as well.

  2. #2
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    I like it!

    Cycling Mirrors - Home

    It looks nice, Tym. So, the spoke arm does ALL the adjustment? No pivot ball thingy in there? I don`t understand exactly how the base-arm connection works, and don`t see any pics of the base on the website. I guess the base is just a piece of plastic with the magnet imbedded into it? Does it register with the arm somehow so that it can`t rotate gradually down while riding?

    It just so happens that my current mirror is wearing out (plastic ball and socket) and doesn`t hold its adjustment well any more, so a few more cussing sessions along the highway shoulder and I`ll be ready to replace it! Maybe will go with Rearview this time around.
    Recalculating....

  3. #3
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    Hi,

    Yes, we need to get some pics of the mount posted. There are two small neodymium magnets, one in the base of the arm and one in the mounting plate. The arm base has two aluminum pins that fit into holes in the mounting plate to keep it from rotating. The mounting plate itself is attached to the helmet with double sided tape. We found two tapes that work very well - servo tape from the RC car world, and the 3M tape made to hold on auto body panels. We went with the servo tape because if you need to remove it, for instance to put it on a new helmet, it comes off in one piece unlike the foam stuff.

    The mount is very stable. We've done a lot of ride testing, but there aren't any long downhills around here so we've hung a helmet out of a car sunroof going down the highway at 60mph+. It seems the mirror itself just doesn't create enough drag to dislodge it from the helmet. We also created a vibration torture test made from an old hedge trimmer. It ran until we got tired of listening to it after fifteen minutes, no problems.

    Due to the spring of the arm, it will detach from impact if you were to drop your helmet, or get in a crash. We've tested this as well, dropping it until we simply got tired of trying to break it. (we should probably retire that helmet, LOL)

    And yes, the arm does all the adjustment. Once you get it aimed it stays there, unless you do something to bend it. You can bend a 18-8 stainless spoke a lot, before fatiguing it, so it should never be a problem.

    Frankly, I like take-a-look mirrors and their adjustments, but all the rest with ball sockets never worked well for me. My son had a Chuck Harris mirror and the rigid arm just makes more sense. Unless you share a helmet with someone else - highly unlikely - there's just no need to readjust a helmet mirror.

  4. #4
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tym Tucker View Post
    Due to the spring of the arm, it will detach from impact if you were to drop your helmet, or get in a crash. We've tested this as well, dropping it until we simply got tired of trying to break it. (we should probably retire that helmet, LOL)
    Haha! So then you just lose it instead of losing it AND breaking it!

    Seriously though, it does sound good- a pair of pins ought to do just fine for keeping it from moving in relation to the base. Have previously used Take a Look (not bad), Third Eye (couldn`t ever get it adjusted), now on my second Cycle Aware Heads Up- all mounted to glassses frame. I like the idea of helmet mounted better, but as far as I know, none could be removed and installed on a regular basis. I`ll try yours next time around. As a side note, I credit the extra long mirror surface on the Heads Up with making it easier to aim than the Third Eye. If RVG offered a slightly bigger mirror as an option, I`d prefer that route, but willing to try the standard one anyway because it does look like a winner. Good luck with the start up!

    EDIT: in case you don`t know, the Commuting subforum on bikeforums.net has a much bigger audience than mtbr. And mirrors are a frequent discusion on the Crazyguyonabike (bike touring specialty site) forum. if you register on CGOAB, you can also list yourself under "resources" with no worries about Spam Patrol knocking you out.
    Recalculating....

  5. #5
    Give it a crank
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    That's pretty clever, it's definitely better than other mirrors out there. I had a 2-joint one for a while that required constant realignment during a ride. I may have to get one of these, thanks for posting!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn-Rider View Post
    That's pretty clever, it's definitely better than other mirrors out there. I had a 2-joint one for a while that required constant realignment during a ride. I may have to get one of these, thanks for posting!
    I have had three of these. One required constant adjustment, one would resist any change except when the helmet was stored, and the current one, They eventually break at the mirror-pivot connection. I have a spare on hand, so it will be awhile yet for this idea. I have to wrap the sticky mount with electrical tape and it needs to be refreshed. This system sounds good.

    BrianMc

  7. #7
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    Thanks! I was planning on posting at bikeforums, did that this evening, but forgot about CGOAB...

    The mirrors we use are 1.5" dia., which is pretty big. I wish I still had a Cycle Aware around to measure it; seems like about that tall but not as wide? Lemme know if my memory is failing me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn-Rider View Post
    That's pretty clever, it's definitely better than other mirrors out there. I had a 2-joint one for a while that required constant realignment during a ride. I may have to get one of these, thanks for posting!
    Give it a try. Nothing more annoying than your mirror moving. The first time I tested a prototype was a 40 mile part road, part singletrack ride with killer headwinds on the road sections. After all the hassle with previous mirrors moving around all I could think of was "nailed it!"

  9. #9
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    hi tym,

    i ordered one just now

    joel

  10. #10
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    I`ve had mine for about two months now, and keep meaning to report on it (you know how that goes). It`s pretty slick! Takes a while to dial in, but it`s worth the trouble. It pops off instantly and always goes back in exactly the same place. I just need to remember to stuff it in my pocket when I park and walk into a store or something. I`ve gotten back on the bike a few times after hanging my helmet from the stem and don`t notice until I go to look back that it isn`t on the helmet any more. The first time that happened, I made a U-turn and searched the ground only to realize that it was stuck to my headtube! Since then I skip the U-turn and look immediately on the bike- so far it hasn`t fallen any further than my fork crown.
    Recalculating....

  11. #11
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    Any studies made about the risks/benefits of a powerful magnet near your brain? I read somewhere that it can cure depression but I guess that would be redundant when you're biking.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I`ve had mine for about two months now, and keep meaning to report on it (you know how that goes). It`s pretty slick! Takes a while to dial in, but it`s worth the trouble. It pops off instantly and always goes back in exactly the same place. I just need to remember to stuff it in my pocket when I park and walk into a store or something. I`ve gotten back on the bike a few times after hanging my helmet from the stem and don`t notice until I go to look back that it isn`t on the helmet any more. The first time that happened, I made a U-turn and searched the ground only to realize that it was stuck to my headtube! Since then I skip the U-turn and look immediately on the bike- so far it hasn`t fallen any further than my fork crown.
    nice, thanks for the followup!

    i am glad to hear that it is working out for you

    joel

  13. #13
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    i wanted to give a BIG thumbs up for this product.

    once i 'tuned' it so i could actually see over my shoulder.... i have to say, this is really a great product.

    lane changes and just checking my six o'clock postion is sooooo much easier.

    i was pushing my bike up a pretty steep trail that was rutted, pot holed and was crazy rocky and i used it to check if anything big was following me up - lol.

    joel

  14. #14
    weirdo
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    So, you`re using it on the trail? Wow!
    Just curious if that`s your first mirror.
    Recalculating....

  15. #15
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    yes, first mirror.

    the trail i was on before it got ugly was a hiking/horse trail so very easy going.

    the climb was to steep and nasty for me so i had to push my bike up.

    so, i left the mirror on.

    joel

  16. #16
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    Link to his product?

  17. #17

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