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  1. #1
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    Hack for keeping hands warm

    After reading about vapor barriers on here, I decided to give it a shot. I found that in the really cold temps some of my gloves simply are not up to par. Also, when I would ride and sweat the gloves would take a LONG TIME to get dry again and in most cases I would find myself riding home in wet gloves which made the trek miserably cold.

    I picked up some one-size-fits-all plastic food service gloves:



    Now, each time I ride I slip some of the food service gloves on first and then throw my regular gloves on. What I have discovered is that my hands generally stay much more toasty doing this and my gloves stay dry. As for the effects on my hands in relation to the bike, I noticed that I dont even feel the plastic once I slide my regular gloves on. The plastic is a bit more slick on the inside of the glove than your hand would be so there is just a little more slippage, but I have never had my hand slide off the grip or anything while using these gloves and notice no real difference in physical capabilities with them on.

    These gloves can be picked up really cheap and are readily available. Just thought I would pass the info and this little "trick" along.
    Last edited by Helmsdini; 02-05-2009 at 03:54 PM.
    -Jeremy
    08 Redline D440
    Nashbar 'cross frankenbike
    11 Scott CR1

  2. #2
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    Double

  3. #3
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    I use the $1 little black stretchy gloves and outer gloves that are big. I've tried plastic/latex gloves, but do not like them. My hands sweat alot, but the little black gloves do not absorb moisture very well, so it goes through them and into the glove, but I don't feel it. If I need to take off my gloves but they don't have time to dry, slipping my hands in with the little black gloves prevents me from feeling the wetness inside my outer glove.

    Pretty happy with this system.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    I use the $1 little black stretchy gloves and outer gloves that are big. I've tried plastic/latex gloves, but do not like them. My hands sweat alot, but the little black gloves do not absorb moisture very well, so it goes through them and into the glove, but I don't feel it. If I need to take off my gloves but they don't have time to dry, slipping my hands in with the little black gloves prevents me from feeling the wetness inside my outer glove.

    Pretty happy with this system.
    +1

    I use thin wool gloves that are just over a dollar for 2 pair as glove liners. Then I put my regular gloves over those. Works really well for me.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for this post, Helmsdini. I have been moderately interested by vapour barriers as well but haven't experimented with them. I've got some gloves from the lab here at work and I'm going to try the system on the way home tonight ( in like 5 minutes, or as soon as I get of this damn internet thing ).
    I have been mostly successful so far with wool liners, especially for commuting where you can get the liner dry between commutes, but the vapour barrier is a whole different idea and I'm looking forward to seeing how it works.
    Cheers, Dave

  6. #6
    jrm
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    Fox Polaris gloves

    [I think there snowmobile gloves but they work.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dskunk
    Thanks for this post, Helmsdini. I have been moderately interested by vapour barriers as well but haven't experimented with them. I've got some gloves from the lab here at work and I'm going to try the system on the way home tonight ( in like 5 minutes, or as soon as I get of this damn internet thing ).
    I have been mostly successful so far with wool liners, especially for commuting where you can get the liner dry between commutes, but the vapour barrier is a whole different idea and I'm looking forward to seeing how it works.

    Any results? It took me a few days to confirm that they were keeping me warmer- I find that hands and feet are finicky. Sometimes I will be hot (core temp) and my extremities are freezing- other times I will be cold with toasty hands and feet. Sometimes just out of nowhere my hands will get cold on a ride. I suppose it is just my capillaries trying to regulate my core by forcing blood into/ out of my limbs (at least that is what I have heard)
    -Jeremy
    08 Redline D440
    Nashbar 'cross frankenbike
    11 Scott CR1

  8. #8
    More than a little slow
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helmsdini
    Any results?
    I don't think I've tried them enough to really say. For an hour commute in -10 C weather my hands have been warm the whole time but then just wearing gloves works at that temp too. I was hoping to try out the VBs on a longer weekend ride which is where I'm hoping there will be a big advantage. I've had to cancel the last couple of weekends of riding though (outside anyway).
    One thing I found really interesting was that although my hands were soaking wet at the end of the ride, they dried off in like seconds.

    Guess we won't have to worry about cold hands soon enough
    Cheers, Dave

  9. #9
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Dakine snoboard mittens over my biking gloves works well for me. If you get the thin ones, you'll have no trouble shifting, braking, etc. They act as a great wind barrier and will keep your hand dry when it's raining.

    Might be overkill for some, but I have trouble keeping my hands warm sitting at my desk in the office so I really like this solution and have never had cold hands, even when the the temps have dropped into the low 20's/high teens.

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