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Thread: GreenWheel

  1. #1
    pedal pusher
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    GreenWheel

    Personally, I'd rather pedal on my own, but for those who have longer commutes and don't want to show up to work sweaty everyday, this might be a viable option.

    Link: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29259226/


  2. #2
    trail rat
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    Soon as they get a 29er version, I'm all over it.....

    Not my cup of tea, really, but anything that gets cars off the road to save fossil fuels, even a little, is good in my book.
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  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=slocaus]Soon as they get a 29er version, I'm all over it..... [QUOTE]

    Given that the entire system is built into the hub and can be laced to any rim, I'd say there already is a 29" version. And a 24" version, and 650b, etc.

  4. #4
    MTT
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    Have you seen this thing? Could be the future of commuting and/ or mountain biking? Pricey now, but I imagine they will come down. As I get older this thing looks better every year................MTT

    http://www.optibike.com/

  5. #5
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Not into MAB myself, but it looks like a vast improvement over current electric set-ups. As stated previously, anything to get people out of cars and onto bikes!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  6. #6
    trail rat
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    @ Fungazi - Yeah, I know it can be done. I was just tongue in cheek. Cool concept, I still love to push my own pedals though.

    @MTT - The Optibike is nice. That me be my choice when I get old. I'll turn 60 in April, give me 10 years or so and I will give it serious consideration.
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  7. #7
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    A different shade of green

    The big problem with electric assist is the regulations that they have as opposed to gas. 20 mph vs. 30 mph is huge in IMNSHO. I can pedal my bike at 20 without assist but to maintain 30 no way. The Greenwheel is a good effort though and will be useful for some in the burgeoning Low Speed Vehicle movement, especially in the folding bike apt. dweller/commute to the train marketplace.

    I get 150+ mpg with this bike and can average 30 with it. However pedaling with resistance stops about 26mph on this bike mainly due to the 20" wheel. You can assist going up hills though and maintain the 26 mph by relieving the motor at that time. You don't have to pedal but you will drop about 4 mph and I like to pedal as much as possible just because I like to pedal. But I also am getting more and more addicted to the speed and keeping up with the flow of traffic
    DSC01155.JPG

    The blue bike's human drivetrain links in to the motor's drive via a jackshaft with a 5:1 reduction box on the motor. I have a Sach's dual drive on the rear for a total of 21spd's but my ability to shift the motor drive makes the bike illegal to operate under federal laws and most all of the states that requires an automatic transmission for motorized bicycles either electric or ICE.

    The second generation takes the human/motor interface one step further and makes the bike legal. By separating the motor drive from the human drive system via a simple belt and pulley with idler that runs directly off the crank. This creates a single speed motor drive that meets federal requirements and is 95% efficient. The blue bikes drive is probably more like 60% or so because of the drag of all gears and jackshaft. It is noisy too because of the gears and the pulley system is virtually silent. Combined with a muffled 4 stroke 35cc engine you get a pretty darn quiet machine. Because the motor is direct drive when the idler is engaged you also get compression braking when you let off the gas and can bump start at will.

    On the human side we can do what we want for gearing and have it set up so that at 30 mph we can still be pedaling with resistance. We are using a Schlumpf high speed drive on the prototype but will be using a double chainring set up on future models due to the high cost of the Schlumpf. So think of this bike as a tandem with a 7lb Nelson Vails as the stoker that never gets tired. Because of the new interface with some spirited pedaling one can achieve 200mpg averaging 30mph. Carrying gear........
    DSC01157.JPG
    And yes Slocaus, those are 29" wheels......
    The future is not google-able. William Gibson

  8. #8
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    http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=21
    http://ebikes.ca/

    My projected build:
    Bike: 10mm dropouts, steel, disc,

    LiFePO4 36V 20Ah with charger for $460 : http://www.pingbattery.com/
    Crystalyte 407 rear wheel 26" for $280 : http://ebike.ca/
    Crystalyte 36V 20A peddle first controller for $95
    Twist throttle for $15
    eLogger V3 + LCD for $110 or Cycle Analyst for $135

  9. #9
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    Okay, so I imagine I will be shunned by some in the biking community for getting into my latest venture; an electric bike.

    What? an electric bike? Well, I took an ordinary commuter bike, threw a big battery on the back and brushless motor hub up front. It has a solid state (electronic) controller that goes between the battery and the motor, and Cycle Analyst to meter my usage (speed, amp hours used, watts, voltage, etc).

    Why in the world would I do this??? Well, I've been taking the bus into work everyday for the past three years, and I usually spend about two hours a day going back and forth. My goal was to get my on way commute on this bike down to under a half hour, and my best time yet is 27 minutes. By going back and for on this bike I get an hour of my life back everyday. Not bad. I'm a pretty strong biker, but I don't have shower facilities at work and I'd rather save my legs for the trail instead of the road.

    What's it like? It isn't super torqueeee, but it is pretty dang powerful. When I take off from an intersection, I usually start of pedaling (not necessary)and I blow the cars away. On flat ground I've topped out at 34 mph, and the range is around 25 miles.

    I spent several weeks researching what I wanted out of a bike on www.endless-sphere.com, and purchased my kit from www.comcycle-usa.com.

    What do I have wrapped up in this beast? I spent $450 for the bike (REI - Novara Buzz - with chromoly fork and disk brakes), $900 for the 600W BMC electric motor hub and controller w/ thumb throttle, $900 for the 48v 15 ah LiFePO4 battery, and $145 for the Cycle Analyst (stand alone). Sure I coulda got a motorcycle/scooter, but I at the traffic signals I go to the head of the class, because I cruise down the bike lane.

    Here's video of my project:

    Last edited by u2metoo; 09-08-2009 at 09:24 PM.

  10. #10
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Well I'm not a huge MAB person myself, but I think what you've done is pretty cool. It's certainly faster than taking the bus (ugh) and a lot better than driving. Your rapid acceleration is due to the utter lightness of your rig, something almost any motorcyclist understands!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  11. #11
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I'm holding out for the 250cc two stroke version with an 18 inch back wheel and a 21 inch front, and about 12 inches of suspension travel....
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  12. #12
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    Whoa, I'm guessing that braking forces of a front hub motor must increase significantly with the added mass. I would personally be concerned about stresses to brake mounts, head tube, headset, fork crown areas. The OP rear mounted hub motor looks, to me anyway, more sensible as the a) the rear triangle is structurally stronger than a fork and b) most of the braking forces on a bicycle is applied at the front.
    I'm gravity challenged, adrenaline deficient, and looking for that endorphine high. Shout out, I'll move out of the way. :-)

  13. #13
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by u2metoo
    Okay, so I imagine I will be shunned by some in the biking community for getting into my latest venture; an electric bike.
    Nah- you`ll be OK with electric. You only get shunned when you try to work internal combustion into the mix Ask MABman about that.

    Sounds cool to me, too (electric OR I.C.). Pogliaghi might be right about the stresses on the fork though. Keep us posted.

    The assisted bike that I personally found most interresting had the motor, drive wheel, and battery all incorporated into a modified single wheel trailer. I don`t remember what forum I saw it on- maybe here.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogliaghi
    Whoa, I'm guessing that braking forces of a front hub motor must increase significantly with the added mass. I would personally be concerned about stresses to brake mounts, head tube, headset, fork crown areas. The OP rear mounted hub motor looks, to me anyway, more sensible as the a) the rear triangle is structurally stronger than a fork and b) most of the braking forces on a bicycle is applied at the front.
    What I don't want to happen is to have the axle rotate in the drop outs. Bad things. This is the primary safety issue with most of the peeps running a front hub. That and spinning out when starting off on gravel.

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