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  1. #1
    endorphinmachine
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    Going rigid, a couple of questions

    Good day.
    Finally decided to swap the old "fork" for a rigid one.
    A couple of questions:
    This is my bike (frame rather, as the only things left from stock are the fork, the headset, and the frame itself, I have a 2008 model, but they don't differ really).
    I picked 2 forks from CRC, the Kinesis Crosslight 3 and Crosslight Pro Carbon. The first question is the height. I can't find any info on that, and I'm afraid it would alter the geometry if significantly shorter.
    The second question is the headset. The stock headset on my bike is an FSA TH-888, a simple threadless one. Both forks require an integrated headset. What would be a good choice for me? There are many headsets available at CRC, but I'm not really in the know when it comes to headsets.

    Hope I can get some tips from you guys! Thanks in advance,
    Art.
    If you think that I'm a fool who'll go for any line, then honey, put down all your money, you win every time...

  2. #2
    a lazy pedaler
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    I'm pretty sure that if your frame doesn't have an integrated headset yet you can't put one on it...but someone will chime in to confirm that...or not.

    regarding height...if your fork has 63mm of travel..you should be ok with something close to 413mm Axle-To-Crown length...well, probably a bit shorter...never bigger than that since those are meant for a 80 mm travel fork replacement...for your reference if it was a 100mm travel fork you should go to a 453mm Axle-To-Crown length...so...may be something around 380mm?
    Last edited by martinsillo; 04-20-2011 at 07:40 AM.

  3. #3
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Never Heard Of This

    Quote Originally Posted by alksv
    Both forks require an integrated headset.
    Where did you get that information?
    Those forks should work fine with any 1 1/8" threadless headset.

    @ martinsillo
    Correct. Integrated headset has to do with the frame's head tube design. That frame will not accept an integrated headset.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  4. #4
    a lazy pedaler
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    a quick search result that most cyclocroish forks are around 390-400mm axle to crown so I guess you should be just fine with one of those.

  5. #5
    endorphinmachine
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    Thank you guys! I think I'm set then. I guess the line "11/8” Integrated – 648g [inc. h.set tensioner]" was misleading as I thought it required an integrated headset. Thanks again!
    If you think that I'm a fool who'll go for any line, then honey, put down all your money, you win every time...

  6. #6
    ride the moment
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    So I'm just gonna put this put there and if you don't like it you just send it right back... Those are some pretty spendy forks to go on an otherwise not-so-spendy commuter. I got a nice Tange fork installed for $60 at my LBS. That bike is a solid commuter, but i wouldn't bother putting a carbon cyclocross fork on it.
    Just because you read a book it don't make you conscious. - MC Lush

  7. #7
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
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    ^^I was thinking the same thing and was going to link to a recent thread where a couple inexpensive forks were mentioned, but I didn't find that thread right off.

  8. #8
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    My guess would be somewhere in the range of 420-440 a/c since the HT is raised up higher for the sys fork, just looking at the curved top and bottom tubes. Looking at the relation from top of the tire to bottom of HT, putting a 390-400 a/c fork on it will lower the front end down to much.

    Would be nice if CRC put a/c on their website specs...

    I would put the frame in a bike stand, set the bike level per the specs and than take an a/c measurement.

    just saying, this is my guess due to the frame being designed around a suspension fork and looking at other Marin hybrid rigid frames, the frames are different.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    The forks can only require an integrated headset aesthetically. To function, the headset's crown race needs to fit on the fork properly. It doesn't care how the fork is shaped below the enlarged part it fits on.

    However, I don't think either of those forks would be a good choice for that bike. On another site, I found the axle-crown for the Kinesis Crosslight quoted at 410mm. Which might be great for a mountain bike with 26" wheels, but I suspect it's going to steepen your Marin quite a lot.

    Did you ever take a measurement? It's the only way to really know what you need in a rigid fork. You want to get pretty close to your bike's current axle-crown height at sag, or you'll notice a change in handling. Alternatively, maybe you want to change the handling. I wouldn't go more than 10-15mm at a time, though.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Basically you want a fork that's "suspension corrected". It will simply increase the axle to crown length. Otherwise your head able is going to be steepened and the steering will be quicker, the bike might feel twitchy and won't be as stable at higher speeds. Your best bet is to look at 29er mountain bike forks, not road or CX.

  11. #11
    a lazy pedaler
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    alksv! check what Andrw and Straz said!!! I was thinking 26rs! my bad! sorry!

  12. #12
    endorphinmachine
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    Thanks for the help, guys!
    I measured the a/c and it's ~450 in lockout and travels to around 420 when on.
    I will try the Crosslight 3 fork, and if I feel the handling is too twitchy and uncomfortable, I will just swap it to my old rigid bike and install the sus fork back. I always wanted to ride in a "more aero" position, and maybe I will like the lower handlebar with this fork.

    We'll see in a couple of weeks when the order arrives. I will post an update, maybe someone in the same situation will get something out of it. Again, thanks for all the help!
    If you think that I'm a fool who'll go for any line, then honey, put down all your money, you win every time...

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Don't forget that until you're using a longish -17 degree stem, flipped down, at the bottom of the spacer stack, you still have a fair amount of adjustability above the head tube. Dirt drops, a moustache bar, an inverted riser, etc, can get you lower too.

    I'll be curious to see how it goes with the handling change.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
    endorphinmachine
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    Thanks for the tips, Andrew. Of course I understand there are options to go lower, but with the heavy city traffic, there's a lot of braking and triggering, often at the same time, that I feel a flat bar is a more comfortable and safer option for me. I'm also curious about the handling change, and I think I will enjoy faster response and weight reduction. I will certainly chime in once I install the fork. My only fear at this point is if the frame with a 1.1/8 threadless head will accept the fork.
    If you think that I'm a fool who'll go for any line, then honey, put down all your money, you win every time...

  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I don't think it's that important whether you drop the front end by going to a shorter fork or by lower the handlebars - you still end up in a lower riding position. However, one of them will alter the bike's handling tendencies by quite a lot, while the other mostly just moves the dude on top of it. If you don't want to change your riding position and you go to a shorter A-C, you'll need more spacers, a higher-angle stem, risers, etc.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
    endorphinmachine
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    Reporting as promised. Swapped the fork a couple of days ago. Didn't change anything else (same amount of spacers, same stem position). At this point, I can say with confidence that this was one of the best changes I made to the bike. The handling is more responsive, the bike feels quite a bit lighter, with better acceleration and handling. The fork behaves even better on bad roads than the sus fork in lockout. Overall, I'm really happy with it, enjoying the ride more than ever. The dropout eyelets for fenders are a great bonus too!
    If you think that I'm a fool who'll go for any line, then honey, put down all your money, you win every time...

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