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  1. #1
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    Frozen Butt... among other things

    So, I've been off the bike since the temperature here plummeted earlier this week, mostly due to my hands freezing almost instantly. A pair of bar-mitts came in today,and I peddled around for about half an hour, now my butt and other things are frozen. I've not got any fit problems from the saddle, no blood-flow issue. Its a flat out cold butt issue. You guys got any ancient cycling secrets to solve this?

    Saddle: Selle Anatomica Titanico X
    Base: Underarmour Cold-Gear leggings
    Pants: 5.11 Tac-Lite Pro

  2. #2
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    aside from being comfortable, a chamois also provides a degree of insulation

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    Guess I'll give 'em a shot again. Never really found them to increase comfort, but this coldness of the posterior is a whole new kettle of cold, cold fish. Maybe I need to talk Patagonia into making some boxer-briefs out of R1.

  4. #4
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    You also don't say what temp range you're dealing with. The simplest answer is if part of your body is cold, you need another layer. What that layer should be depends on the temp range, and any additional factors that might be at play, including moisture, wind, etc.

    Looking at the gear you're using specifically, I'm going to suggest that it's either wind or moisture (or both) that's causing your butt problems. The stuff you're wearing isn't exactly intended for bike use. Sometimes, that doesn't matter that much, but in these kinds of conditions, I find it to be very helpful. It's hard to beat an insulated pair of bike tights with wind/precip barrier panels in bad weather for maximum functionality with minimal excess bulk. I have hobbled by for years by layering non-bike stuff with regular cycling shorts, but I'm finding it woefully inadequate these days. You can still layer stuff with the bike tights if you find that necessary for one reason or another.

  5. #5
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    34*F
    52% Humidity

    The problem lies in the fact that any insulation on my butt is getting crushed and given the free airflow underneath the saddle, convection is robbing my posterior. As far as the general viability of the bottom layers, I wear these particular layers while hiking easily down to the 20's with high winds. The base-layer is, apart from the butt/saddle union perfect for the weather/activity level today.

    As stated I'm going to dig out my chamois and see if that superfluous butt padding will nix the problem. Failing that, I'm tempted to buy a CCF sleeping pad at Walmart and go all arts-and-crafts on the underside of the saddle. I doubt I'd be having this problem with the average saddle since there's substantial enough material to mitigate convection through the saddle.

    Thanks again man!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpmonkey View Post
    34*F
    52% Humidity

    given the free airflow underneath the saddle, convection is robbing my posterior.
    Geez 34 f is not cold...

    But if convection is the problem...get some bike tights with the wind proof front and the really light breathable rear....then put on some standard bike shorts with chamois under the tights...

    This set up takes me down to -20C easy...

  7. #7
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    In the cold i usually throw on a pair of jogging pants over my work pants. They work as windbreaker since i find that wind is the root of the cold not really the temp itself. At least for me anyway.

  8. #8
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    Ok, so let me clarify this a bit. I'm not cold, not even remotely cold. My legs are warm, I had to loosen up the upper layers after a while to cool off. My butt and genitals were cold, they and they alone. I have a solid understanding of how to dress in all manner of inclement weather including cold, rain, high wind, high humidity and even some etc. Due to the fact that while riding, the body-weight being transferred through your butt to the saddle serves to compress any insulation you have. Even though there are 3 layers (base/outer/saddle) between my bum and the wind, due to the fact the saddle is one thin layer of leather, convection robs that very specific area of warmth. Nate's suggestion of chamois is much more appropriate to the conversation than pants to block the wind (which will do absolutely nothing for the part of my body on the saddle, which is being robbed of heat by conduction through the layers out to the saddle, which is subsequently being robbed of heat by convection, which due to its thin, thin nature is easily victimized by convection.)

  9. #9
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    Just a thought, with the clothes you wore and being in the cycling position, were they drawn tight around your waist/butt reducing their insulative qualities?

    Seems like at 34 with tights and trousers on you should have been sweaty, not cold...

  10. #10
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    No they aren't tight in the waist/butt, I described the mechanics behind the issue up above. It's basically a cyclists version of the hammockers CBS.

  11. #11
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    perhaps you need a cold weather saddle, something a little thicker to stop the loss from the breeze?
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

  12. #12
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    t0pcat,

    Yeah, that's why I'm thinking about getting a CCF sleep pad from walmart and carving it up. Wouldn't be hard to cut it to the shape of the saddle and sandwich it between the rail and the seat.

  13. #13
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    Frozen Butt... among other things

    Well I guess you have it all figured out then

  14. #14
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    Got a couple things to try anyway nate. I appreciate your help. I'll be rollin' around in the chamois a bit tomorrow.

  15. #15
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    pinched nerve
    2014 Nail Trail 29er

  16. #16
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    There's a difference between numbness from a pinched nerve, and well, when you're butt and gentlemens area is just flat cold to the touch.

  17. #17
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    Took her out for a spin, chamois nailed it. Thanks Nate.

  18. #18
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    I can't remember the last time I rode without a chamois. I would imagine that it would feel very weird. Summer and winter, any time I get on the bike to ride more than a mile, I am putting one on.
    '13 FELT TK3 / '09 Jamis Sonik
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  19. #19
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    Funny, I'm kinda the opposite, but right now they are making my butt/groin happy and not ice-cubes.

  20. #20
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    A quality wool base layer is important. I commute every day no matter the temperature or conditions. The worse, the better, right!? I use the 3/4 knicker from Icebreaker, or an 10+year old knicker from Burton. Over that a windproof and water resistant full winter bib (currently a 2005 model Pearl Izumi). The outer layer is army surplus wool knickers for temps under 20F. Over 20F, I wear wind stopping knickers from Swrve.

    Lastly, a long shell that covers the bottom helps keep airflow to a minimum. Get something with a draw cord to cinch around the waist.

    For cold hands: get two pairs of gloves (and use liners for colder temps) and keep one pair between the base and mid- layers. When your hands get cold, stop and switch gloves. Toasty comfort.

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