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  1. #1
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    Five ways that (car) commuting ages you

    5 Ways That Commuting Ages You

    Just in case you needed a reminder of some of the reasons bike commuting is wonderful.

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    neat

    But I just read an article on CNN about the 10 longest commuting city....none were close to an hour on average....longest I think was 39 minutes in New York.

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    Here's one. For example...if you commute by car just 1hr RT x 5 days/week x 49 weeks/yr x 40 years working = 9800 hours = 408 full days you have aged (and not enjoyed) for no good reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Here's one. For example...if you commute by car just 1hr RT x 5 days/week x 49 weeks/yr x 40 years working = 9800 hours = 408 full days you have aged (and not enjoyed) for no good reason.
    1 hour 5 days a week is 5 hours a week by car at 50 km/hr equals 50 km....at 25 km (flat average speed that is 2 hours RT by bike.

    That is 10 hours per week of riding, that will require a significant training program to avoid muscle imbalances and pain in the long term.

  5. #5
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    THis article says a lot about the crazed drivers i encounter on my bike commute. Poor suckers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    1 hour 5 days a week is 5 hours a week by car at 50 km/hr equals 50 km....at 25 km (flat average speed that is 2 hours RT by bike.

    That is 10 hours per week of riding, that will require a significant training program to avoid muscle imbalances and pain in the long term.
    This is very true, and people seem to gloss over it quite a bit. My ankles start hurting after a while, and I need to take a week or two off commuting. I love riding a bike, but I love being able to walk more.

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    quick search showed .26 bike fatalities per million hours for bikes and .47 fatalities per million hours for cars...

    Given the time ratio of 2 to 1 in favour of cars bikes a re slightly more deadly than cars....

    Of course the benefits from improved cardio vascular health exceed these riskd.....

    Or do they?

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    Well at least in the neatherlands (location of study)

    Maybe not so much in say New York?

    Data synthesis

    We quantified the impact on all-cause mortality when 500,000 people would make a transition from car to bicycle for short trips on a daily basis in the Netherlands. We have expressed mortality impacts in life-years gained or lost, using life table calculations. For individuals who shift from car to bicycle, we estimated that beneficial effects of increased physical activity are substantially larger (314 months gained) than the potential mortality effect of increased inhaled air pollution doses (0.840 days lost) and the increase in traffic accidents (59 days lost). Societal benefits are even larger because of a modest reduction in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions and traffic accidents.

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    It doesn't have to be one or the other though. You could bike twice a week and drive the other, drive half way and bike the rest of the way, or combine with public transportation.

    I started out biking once a week, now I typically bike 3-4 days a week, occasional "perfect" weeks when weather permits.

    I'm much happier now than when I had to drive over an hour to work each way, working closer to home made a huge difference in quality of life.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    1 hour 5 days a week is 5 hours a week by car at 50 km/hr equals 50 km....at 25 km (flat average speed that is 2 hours RT by bike.

    That is 10 hours per week of riding, that will require a significant training program to avoid muscle imbalances and pain in the long term.
    Stretching everyday is not that hard. It's a 15-20 minute routine that helps everyone, regardless of their mode of transportation. Ten hours a week on a bike is hardly enough to require a "significant training program." To a professional cyclist (one who requires a "significant training program"), ten hours of saddle time is about a-day-and-a-half's training.

    Sitting for ten hours a week is far worse than ten hours of physical activity a week.

    I'll take some aches and pains over heart-disease, obesity, and other health complications related to a sedentary lifestyle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Sitting for ten hours a week is far worse than ten hours of physical activity a week.

    I'll take some aches and pains over heart-disease, obesity, and other health complications related to a sedentary lifestyle.
    Amen brother

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Stretching everyday is not that hard. It's a 15-20 minute routine that helps everyone, regardless of their mode of transportation. Ten hours a week on a bike is hardly enough to require a "significant training program." To a professional cyclist (one who requires a "significant training program"), ten hours of saddle time is about a-day-and-a-half's training.

    Sitting for ten hours a week is far worse than ten hours of physical activity a week.

    I'll take some aches and pains over heart-disease, obesity, and other health complications related to a sedentary lifestyle.
    Yes and if you are not doing the right things correctly and regularly you will have significant issues after 10 years, and especially as you approach retirement.

    BTW those aches and pains can become incapacitating

    Adn yes 10 hours a week at an average of 25 km/h does take a significant training program.

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    Quick search

    https://www.bhf.org.uk/~/media/files...ainingplan.pdf

    Geez an advanced training plan that has about 7.5 hours a week of riding....

    and most of that is a long easy on Sunday....


    Yes going hard for 2hours a day, is gonna hurt. every week no missing.

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    Doesn't sound like much of a training program if it involves less time in the saddle than my commute/explore/fun saddle time. Maybe I should look into racing. I hear the Cat. 6 races are really competitive.

    Better yet, I'll buy a car and sell all my bikes. That way I won't have to worry about a lean, fit, sometime achey, body in my twilight years; because I'll die of obesity, cardio-vascular failure, complications of diabetes, and stress (mostly from being stuck in traffic and working more to pay for insurance, registration, fuel and maintenance) before than. That is if I'm not first killed by another motorist. Which is more likely at my current age than all of the above ailments put together.

    What happens when you take a tangent to its limit? It goes to inanity... inanity? I mean infinity. Yes. Infinity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Better yet, I'll buy a car and sell all my bikes. That way I won't have to worry about a lean, fit, sometime achey, body in my twilight years; because I'll die of obesity, cardio-vascular failure, complications of diabetes, and stress (mostly from being stuck in traffic and working more to pay for insurance, registration, fuel and maintenance) before than. That is if I'm not first killed by another motorist. Which is more likely at my current age than all of the above ailments put together.
    Why do some people figure it is an either/or proposition....

    Ride hard, have a solid training plan and live a vital crisp old age without muscle aches and pains, excessive arthritis, and potential enlarged heart syndromes???

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    All this banter ignores a fairly big issue. People live so far from work now precisely because of cars.

    If bicycling was a more heavily emphasized and more commonly used mode of transport, I'm going to guess that folks would choose to live closer to where they work.

    -gasp- and what about walking? That mode of transport will encourage people to live even closer to where they work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    All this banter ignores a fairly big issue. People live so far from work now precisely because of cars.

    If bicycling was a more heavily emphasized and more commonly used mode of transport, I'm going to guess that folks would choose to live closer to where they work.

    -gasp- and what about walking? That mode of transport will encourage people to live even closer to where they work.
    A downtown high rise condo project is in the permitting process with a good chance of sucess....no car parking well be provided at all....not sure about bikes?

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    I agree with all of these things. I went from a job where I could commute to work by bike fairly easily to a job where it isn't an option.

    The amount of money I spend on gas and time I waste in traffic is driving me crazy.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    A downtown high rise condo project is in the permitting process with a good chance of sucess....no car parking well be provided at all....not sure about bikes?
    There's one in my city that has begun construction. Car parking is being provided (because there's also a mix of retail going in), but the building is getting bike storage and a bike maintenance facility for residents, too. One of the members of the local mtb club works for the developer, and he says that all of their residential projects include bike facilities like that among the other amenities (pool, fitness room, etc) now.

    Across the street, Cummins (the diesel engine folks) are building a new HQ. That company has actually been quite supportive of bicycles, and a few times a year, they supply a ton of volunteer labor for local mtb trails. Both new buildings are going in right along the Cultural Trail, and right next to the "Bike Hub", which offers a full service bike shop, bike rentals, and bike storage, as well as the biggest bike share station in the city. Those bicycle amenities were big reasons why both projects are ongoing right now. I do not know if Cummins is installing their own bicycle amenities or not.

    It's becoming increasingly easy to be carless living in downtown Indianapolis, and I have friends who live exactly that way. I live 7mi from downtown. I'm still within a pretty reasonable range to ride there and back, but unfortunately, I don't work downtown. I live over 20 miles from where I work on the other side of town. My wife works 15mi the other way, so right now we're kinda in an optimal spot to minimize both of our commutes.

    I am actively seeking something much closer to home (and also that pays better). I ride to work sometimes. I don't ride more frequently, not because of the work of riding, but because of the time. If I drive, I'm ~20 min away. If I ride, it's more like an hour and a half. Each way. That takes away from time to do other things. Preparing cheaper, healthier meals at home. Riding my mtb. Spending time with my wife. Exercising my dogs.

    My wife and I both used to live less than 5 miles from work. Holy sweet mother was it heaven to have such short commutes.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    1 hour 5 days a week is 5 hours a week by car at 50 km/hr equals 50 km....at 25 km (flat average speed that is 2 hours RT by bike.

    That is 10 hours per week of riding, that will require a significant training program to avoid muscle imbalances and pain in the long term.
    So far I am OK, thanks. I don't see 10 hours/week of bikecommuting (not crazy fast) as too tough. That said, I don't feel obligated to ride every day either, if I have conflicts. I feel better exercising regularly via bikecommuting rather than being a "weekend warrior" overdoing it without a good base. I am too old (53 soon) for that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    So far I am OK, thanks. I don't see 10 hours/week of bikecommuting (not crazy fast) as too tough. That said, I don't feel obligated to ride every day either, if I have conflicts. I feel better exercising regularly via bikecommuting rather than being a "weekend warrior" overdoing it without a good base. I am too old (53 soon) for that.
    it is the stretching and strength building the muscles not used fully when biking that I am referring to.

    And yes not going hard all the time is the very start of a training plan.

    And it all matters more when the ship as long sailed past the port of 53.

  22. #22
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    Tl;Dr

    BUT, as you approach the speed of light, time slows. So the faster you go, the longer you'll live. It's science!


    However if you live your entire life on an airplane you can only expect to live a tiny fraction of a second longer than your clone down on the ground. Buy a really fast bike then to even it out.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    it is the stretching and strength building the muscles not used fully when biking that I am referring to.
    Must admit I am lazy on the formal stretching etc. Probably saved somewhat by walking or snowshoeing with the dog before and after the bikecommute, usually 2 miles/day (people miles).

  24. #24
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    In other news, "The Sky is Blue." I cant remember the name of the character in Repo Man who said, "The more you drive, the less intelligent you are."
    Tequila tonight, tomorrow we ride!

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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Train View Post
    In other news, "The Sky is Blue." I cant remember the name of the character in Repo Man who said, "The more you drive, the less intelligent you are."
    Second time I've seen that Repo Man quote today.

    Also, the sky is chartreuse.

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