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  1. #1
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    Cummuting and Folding Bikes

    The cummuter Rail where I live is stuck in the dark ages and only allows Folding bikes... Whats the best one... Dahon... I am looking for something in the style of a Cross country bike...

  2. #2
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    The 'best' one might have to be decided by your budget. Dahon and Downtube offer pretty good value for a reasonable price. Dahon probably has the widest product line of folding bikes.

    A lot of folks consider the Bike Fridays to be the best made, but of course there's a price for that.

    The most convenient fold and tiniest size for a really rideable folding bike seems to belong to the Bromptons, but they are also a higher-priced line.

    I won't even discuss the barely-rideable novelties that trade on being the very smallest. They don't serve for more than very short distances on the smoothest of surfaces.

  3. #3
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Camfan, you`re welcome to ask here, but I think you`ll get more info from the folders subforum on bfnet:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=221

  4. #4
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    I tried a modern Dahon 20" wheeled bike and didn't like it. It felt flimsy, not like it would fall apart, but the rigidity of it while pedaling was poor. It also doesn't have the rolling abilities of a road bike with 700c wheels. In reality, a folding bike is not very portable. It's awkward to carry and there's no easy way to carry it, thus making it feel heavy. I'll stick with a full sized bike for now.

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newaccount
    I tried a modern Dahon 20" wheeled bike and didn't like it. It felt flimsy, not like it would fall apart, but the rigidity of it while pedaling was poor. It also doesn't have the rolling abilities of a road bike with 700c wheels. In reality, a folding bike is not very portable. It's awkward to carry and there's no easy way to carry it, thus making it feel heavy. I'll stick with a full sized bike for now.
    I would imagine the BF models pretty much take care of that flimsiness- for a price. Crazyguy features several journals with people doing long distance tours on them.
    Yeah, they don`t look like they`re very easy to lug around on and off of commuter busses. Probably more suited to throwing in the trunk of your car (or checked once on a Greyhound) for a weekend getaway. I`ve never tried one at all, but I like the idea for those weekend trips.

  6. #6
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    I have a Bike Friday Pocket Rocket and it is every bit as fast as my Merlin road bike. The thing just screams along. If you didn't look down, you wouldn't know you weren't on a full sized wheel road machine. It looks like a clown bike, but it performs very nicely. The only thing is that if you stand and mash or sit and pull back firmly, there is some flex in the handlebar area.

    They also make bikes that are more touring oriented like the Pocket Crusoe and New World Tourist that use the same effective wheel diameter (both 20 inches: 409c vs 451c) that use V as opposed to caliper brakes.

    Note that none of these would replace a mountain bike for offroad. A 20" wheel just won't deal with offroad obstacles or go up and down curbs like a normal bike. For nomral potholes and the like on a road, basic gravel, or bike path, however they do quite well.
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  7. #7
    weirdo
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    Tscheezy, if you keep talking like that, you`re gonna cost me some money.

  8. #8
    PCC
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    I thought about this bike but it is a bit out of my price range and, for the money, it's really heavy.

  9. #9
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    I fully support folding bike as a commuter use.

    When weather is fine, just cycle on the road. If poor weather, just ride to nearest the train station and fold them up.



    When it's time to go, is time to go.
    Fate rarely calls upon us at a moment of our choosing

  10. #10
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    The Bike Friday Tikit is worth a look. It's the fastest-folding and -unfolding bike I've ever seen. (Search Youtube for some videos). The Tikit is designed specifically for those who bike to and from a train or a bus.

    I've test-ridden some Bike Friday models, and also a Brompton. I have good opinions about both those brands.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    The Bike Friday Tikit is worth a look. It's the fastest-folding and -unfolding bike I've ever seen. (Search Youtube for some videos). The Tikit is designed specifically for those who bike to and from a train or a bus.

    I've test-ridden some Bike Friday models, and also a Brompton. I have good opinions about both those brands.
    Here's the video of the Tikit.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQscBxx7wLE

    The pedals fold up too.
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  12. #12
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    consider the Xootr/Swift

    I ride a Swift folder fixed gear. It took a little getting used to coming off of a 700c fixed gear, but after two years on it I wonder how I ever got along without it. The bike handles a 26 mile RT commute with aplomb, and when the rains start, I fold it up and duck into the subway. You can buy one new (8 speed) for under $700. Or you can do what I did and order the frame/fork/seatpost/stem direct from Peter Reich, then put together a custom project. I looked at a number of folders before going with the Swift: Brompton, Dahon, Airnimal, Birdy, Bike Friday. They each have something different to offer. I new I wanted a bike that used nonproprietary components and that would handle he rigors of fixed gear riding. That left me with the Airnimal, the Friday or the Swift (although Dahon has an option that works, I know now). Requiring the bike to fold easily without tools left me with the Swift. The Swift could easily be set up with off road (BMX) tires and v brakes. I don't know that I would feel comfortable taking any folding bike with a long stempost over the rough stuff, but my Swift is easy to hop up curbs and the like. Good luck with your search.
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  13. #13
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    Fixed Dahon?

    [QUOTE=buddhak I wanted a bike that used nonproprietary components and that would handle he rigors of fixed gear riding. That left me with the Airnimal, the Friday or the Swift (although Dahon has an option that works, I know now). [/QUOTE]

    Which Dahon will take a fixed gear?

  14. #14
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    Dahon Cadenza Solo is a fixed/single speed bike.

    It come with a flip-flop hub and bull-horn handlebar
    When it's time to go, is time to go.
    Fate rarely calls upon us at a moment of our choosing

  15. #15
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    Wow I guess I'm late to the party. I have a few Dahon's two 20 incher's and two 26'ers. My 20 inch Dahon's are a Speed D7 (Dahon's entry model bike) and the Jetstream P8 (a medium grade full suspension bike). The 26 inch Dahons that I own are a Dahon Jack and a Dahon Fuego (a true full suspension portable but not folding bike with a Reba SL fork and a Manitou Swinger shock).

    Here are my impressions of the 20 inch Dahon bikes.

    The Speed D7 is a decent starter bike if you want to pedal it around the city but you'll quickly destroy if you use it to pedal for miles on end. However for 2-4 mile journeys it isn't too bad. If you jump off a sidewalk or meet the occaisional railroad track you'll destroy your Speed D7 in no time.

    The Jetstream P8 is a great bike and is much more durable than the Speed D7. The full suspension on the Jetstream P8 allows you to survive mildly stressful city riding conditions and let's you take potholes and even occaisionally jump off of sidewalks without seriously thrashing the bike. I think the newer ones are $800 however older models can be found for $680+. In terms of portability this is a portable bike so all you have to do is throw it into the trunk and pull it out whenever you feel like like riding. However it's not something that you would simply sling on your back and walk around with.
    In terms of commuting going seven or even ten miles isn't too much of a problem. However I think a 26 incher with a 44 or even 42 t chainring will easily outrun the Jetstream.

    26 inch bikes.

    Fuego. The Fuego has been discontinued but it was Dahon's first attempt at building a proper full suspension mountain bike. I've taken the Fuego down therock garden known as the chutes at Santiago Oaks and the bike was able to handle it with some difficulty,of course I was running 50 psi for the rear shock so that probably has alot to do with it. However the Fuego is doesn't just fold up it actually needs to be disassembled,although it can be broken down into a form that will fit into any trunk.

    The other Dahon I have is the Jack. Dahon's 26 inch folding bike. This thing is a real workhorse and is moderately priced (although it's not as cheap as the Speed D7). You can jump of sidewalks without thrashing the bike too badly,although the front wheel may eventually go out of true. It feels more durable and sturdy than the Speed D7 and even the full suspension Jetstream P8. I've swapped out the rigid fork on mine and added a Fox F80 fork and a code 5 front disc brake. It's a fun bike to ride and it can be easily upgraded with all sorts of crazy hardware.

    Everyone who has ridden the Jack likes it best out of three folders (note that I count the Fuego as a portable bike and not a folder). It's just beefier and a little more stable. However the Jack does have it's downsides,first of all it's bigger than the other folders making it harder to accomodate in some car trunks. For example if I ride the Jetstream I can just throw it into my cousin's Lexus IS 350 trunk after I fold it. If I'm riding the Jack I have to take off front and rear wheels before I can put it into his trunk,making it somewhat less convenient.

    If you have the space I would suggest the Jack it's reasonably priced at an MSRP of $521 and it can take some abuse.

  16. #16
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    For fast, simple folding and convenience in packing along on the bus or the train, the Brompton and the Tikit are pretty close competitors. The Tikit isn't cheap, at around $1300 for the bike with front and rear racks; the Brompton is a bit more, and is a little neater fold... virtually turning itself into a rolling briefcase.

    I have a Tikit, which I keep folded under my desk for business trips and errands around the campus...
    Ride a mountain bike... you will not regret it if you live.
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  17. #17
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    another vote for the swift.

    i bought the stock bike from xootr, then began replacing some parts like saddle, bar, tires, and a rear wheel to go fixed. fairly light, quite stiff, and fast.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiatkiat
    I fully support folding bike as a commuter use.

    When weather is fine, just cycle on the road. If poor weather, just ride to nearest the train station and fold them up.



    I bought a Dahon Fox folding bike in China (2008), it looks a lot like yours. It came with a Fox suspension fork.



    However, it only has a 6-speed in the rear (freewheel, not casette). Budget Shimano rear derailleur, grip shifters. It looks like you upgraded yours:

    - Scott wheels
    - 8 speed cassette?
    - better derailleurs
    - trigger shifters

    Can you comment more on your upgrades?

    What kind of tires are you running?

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