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  1. #1
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    Smile comuting questions

    hi i just wanted to know after riding a long time in the saddle i get very sore i have a gell seat and shorts with padding.

    the bike i have is 27 speed and what i find really helps is if i put the crank in the top gear and put the rear rings to the bottom so the bike is in the strongest gear and stand up pushing my wight from side to side. i go much faster saving me time and for a good 5-10min it's easier on my behind.

    im just wondering is it safe for my frame and chain to ride in this way. or am i putting to much stress on the bike

    thanks
    2009 XC FSR Expert
    2007 Jamis Durango 2.0 HT

  2. #2
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    It's fine for your frame & gears.
    What you want to avoid is cross-gearing that is to say having the chain on the biggest (outside) ring and biggest (inside) cog, or vice-versa, as this will cause excess wear on the chain.

    As far as the soreness goes it could be a couple of things. Firstly it's normal that you get sore the first few rides of the season, should go away after that. If the problem is chaffing though it might be the saddle. Gel saddles might seem more comfortable but in reality they aren't, they tend to be wider and bulkier and this means there's a lot more chance for chaffing. If you are riding a lot a different saddle might be a good idea.

  3. #3
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    One thing to keep in mind is wear. The little cogs wear faster than the big ones as the force is distributed across fewer teeth.
    Get a narrower saddle. WTB is good. Get it up higher too.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Get it up higher too.
    You can't say that without qualifying it.
    A good rule of thumb for saddle height (unless you are wearing high-heeled shoes while riding ) is to put the saddle at a height such that your leg is completely extended when your heel is on the pedal. That way when you pedal properly with the ball of your foot on the pedal you should have approximately the right saddle height.
    Also worth making sure your saddle is level or maybe a couple of degrees nose down.

  5. #5
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    The typical correlation is that the wider the saddle the lower it must be. Judging off his saddle choice and the necessary change to a proper saddle, the height is probably insufficient.

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