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  1. #1
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    Commuting - Seat Post Rack (Carry Suit Pants + Dress Shirt)

    Hey,

    So I will be commuting this summer on my mountain bike and I don't want to/can't install a regular pannier rack.

    So I was thinking of going with a seatpost rack instead.

    I don't plan on carrying a heavy load on the rack and I like the option of being able to easily take it off.

    I have a backpack that will carry most of my stuff, but I was thinking of putting my suit pants and dress shirt in a bag that goes on the seatpost rack. Suit pants and dress shirt are really light so I do not believe it would put any strain on the seatpost rack.

    My question is:
    - Are there any particular seatpost racks that are better than others that you would recommend? p.s. my seatpost is not carbon.
    - Are you aware of any good bags that would do a good job for carrying my suit pants and dress shirt so that they don't get all rinkled, etc.?

    Edit:
    - I think I might just go a simple route. Fold dress shirt and pants like in this video: How to fold a suit, pants and shirt to go in a suitcase without wrinkling - YouTube
    - Put dress shirt and dress pants in briefcase
    - Strap briefcase to seatpost rack

    Thanks
    Last edited by Sean1337; 04-11-2013 at 09:44 AM.

  2. #2
    29er and 26er
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    I think you found your answer. This is what I would do if I HAD to bring my dress clothing with me.

    If I were you, I would make 1 trip by car each week and drop off all of new clean clothing and pick up the dirty.

  3. #3
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    ^ +1 this. I have used a Topeak seat post rack, and it's nice for small stuff, but I can't see using it for clothing that has to stay wrinkle free. If it were for casual stuff (jeans and golf shirt, etc..) it will do fine. I'd suggest using the backpack with a small board or heavy rigid cardboard to keep your clothes smooth and straight. Weight wouldn't be an issue (rack is good for 15-20#'s), but size of the area of the bag.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  4. #4
    Squeaky Wheel
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    I bring dress clothes to the office every day. I use a modification of the method shown in the video. Don't fold, roll.

    First, unless you have a need, I would leave the suit jacket at the office. It's bulky and despite how easy he makes it look in the video, suit jackets are hard to fold/roll properly.

    Take your dress pants and lay them out flat with the cuffs towards you, no wrinkles.

    You see where he had the dress shirt laid out with the sleeves folded in but he had not yet folded the shirt into a square - where it's laying there long and narrow? Take it and carefully lay it on top of your dress pants, up towards the belt. Now neatly fold your undershirt to be about the same width as the pants and carefully lay it on top of the pants/dress shirt starting down by the pant cuff. Fold your underpants and lay them on top down by the cuff. Now, starting at the cuff of your pants, take your socks and start rolling around them. Roll the whole package up into a bundle. Roll carefully and try to minimize wrinkles. Wrap your belt around the bundle and put the whole bundle into a plastic bag which should fit into an average size pannier or trunk bag.

    When you get to the office pull everything out and hang up the pants and dress shirt while you take your shower to let the fabric relax (hanging them near the shower where they are exposed to the shower steam helps). If you did it right you'll have very few wrinkles and creases and those you have will not really be noticeable once you put your clothes on.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    I bring dress clothes to the office every day. I use a modification of the method shown in the video. Don't fold, roll.

    First, unless you have a need, I would leave the suit jacket at the office. It's bulky and despite how easy he makes it look in the video, suit jackets are hard to fold/roll properly.

    Take your dress pants and lay them out flat with the cuffs towards you, no wrinkles.

    You see where he had the dress shirt laid out with the sleeves folded in but he had not yet folded the shirt into a square - where it's laying there long and narrow? Take it and carefully lay it on top of your dress pants, up towards the belt. Now neatly fold your undershirt to be about the same width as the pants and carefully lay it on top of the pants/dress shirt starting down by the pant cuff. Fold your underpants and lay them on top down by the cuff. Now, starting at the cuff of your pants, take your socks and start rolling around them. Roll the whole package up into a bundle. Roll carefully and try to minimize wrinkles. Wrap your belt around the bundle and put the whole bundle into a plastic bag which should fit into an average size pannier or trunk bag.

    When you get to the office pull everything out and hang up the pants and dress shirt while you take your shower to let the fabric relax (hanging them near the shower where they are exposed to the shower steam helps). If you did it right you'll have very few wrinkles and creases and those you have will not really be noticeable once you put your clothes on.
    Thanks for the tip.

    Trying to visualize what you are doing.

    For this part:
    Take your dress pants and lay them out flat with the cuffs towards you, no wrinkles.

    Are you folding the pants (e.g. so that both legs are on top of each other)? Or are both legs of the pants out in front of you flat.

    Thx

  6. #6
    Squeaky Wheel
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    With the legs on top of each other - think of it as laying your pants on their side.

    (Or another way to think about it...like they are on one of those hangers that clip to the cuffs with the pants hanging down...except laying flat)
    Last edited by woodway; 04-11-2013 at 06:20 PM.

  7. #7
    jrm
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    agree on the rolling thang. i can fit a lot more in my pack if i roll everything
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  8. #8
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    Re: Commuting - Seat Post Rack (Carry Suit Pants + Dress Shirt)

    It's there any way you can leave clothes at your office? I keep dress shirts, slacks and shoes at my office so all I need to carry are smaller items.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBrider View Post
    It's there any way you can leave clothes at your office? I keep dress shirts, slacks and shoes at my office so all I need to carry are smaller items.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
    I think the issue with that plan would be that I won't be commuting every day of the week. This is my first time commuting by bike so I don't want to overstress myself. To start I will probably only bike 2-3 times per week and only when the weather is good.

    So for the days when I don't bike I will need to get dressed at home ... so leaving my clothes at the office would not work.

  10. #10
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    Something like this might come in handy:

    Bags To Go | Eagle Creek - Pack-Itâ„¢ Folder 15

  11. #11
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    I don't bring a suit to work, but I definitely use the rolling method versus folding my work clothing when putting them in my backpack. It helps that I buy wrinkle free paints and shirts.

    Good luck and let us know how things work out when you find a plan that works.

  12. #12
    jrm
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    why not bring clothes in for the days you do ride on the days you dont ride. Thats what i do
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    why not bring clothes in for the days you do ride on the days you dont ride. Thats what i do
    Because I take the bus and I'd rather not carry clothes on the bus...

    I think I'll start off with the Eagle Creek Pack-It Folder 15. Reviews seem good and it seems easier than rolling, albeit taking up more space.

    I tried rolling my dress pants last night and I wasn't very successful...(rinkles kept appearing as I was rolling).

    I'll let you know how the Eagle Creek method works out.

  14. #14
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Just FYI - I also tried an eagle creek folder. They are bigger than you think.

    Your pants will not roll perfectly flat on the inside. But what you will find is that if you hang them for a few minutes after unrolling they will look fine. Try rolling a bundle this weekend, leave it rolled for a couple hours and then unroll and hang. See what you think before you spend the money on the eagle creek thing.

  15. #15
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    There's a store right next to where I work that carried the eagle creek so I went ahead and bought it. It's actually pretty small...at least the eagle creek 15 is...

    I won't be carrying too much so I don't foresee weight or space being an issue.

    As for rolling...I'll give it a try this weekend. I can always return the eagle creek if I find rolling works better.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean1337 View Post
    So for the days when I don't bike I will need to get dressed at home ... so leaving my clothes at the office would not work.
    Sensible! Commuting naked and not getting dressed until you get to work tends to cause problems.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Sensible! Commuting naked and not getting dressed until you get to work tends to cause problems.

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