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  1. #1
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    Commuter Clothes?

    Iím going to be starting a new assignment at work that should allow me at least a couple days where I can reasonably commute, with hopefully more days as I get settled in and more autonomous. Currently I have to wear a tie and have no access to shower at work and Iím much farther away so bike commuting wasnít an option. Iím going to have more flexibility in dress code now. I can get away with polos or button up shirts with collars, khakis and cargos. I canít get away with t-shirts, shorts or jeans.

    I was thinking Iíd like to get some clothes that could double as work/riding so I donít have to change too much. Synthetic for sweat evaporation, stretchy for riding in types of thing. Obviously for hotter weather Iíll just bring a change but for spring/fall days I was hoping there were good options for do-it-all clothes. I already have a grocery-getter with rack/trunk bag/pannier that I can commute on and the ride is a quick five miles or less.

    Anyone have suggestions or should I just reserve myself to changing all year round? I was looking at Club Ride Apparel which makes nice stuff but its pricey. Was going to look into Zoic too since I think they make some shirts that fit the bill.

    Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
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    I just change, but I'm also way too cheap to invest in a wardrobe of hybrid clothes. I leave my shoes and pants/shorts at work and bring a fresh shirt and underwear daily. Sometimes I swap the pants/shorts out mid-week, if I'm feeling like an overachiever. Otherwise I just figure the worse I smell, the more people will leave me alone to do my work.

  3. #3
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    Getting to work in the mornings it feels fantastic to swap sweaty riding clothes for something clean and dry. My ride is less than 5 miles, and it still feels great to change.

    I do see a few people who ride in khakis, but if I did that I'd be terrified of puddles. By far the majority of other commuters I see must also be changing when they get to work.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Getting to work in the mornings it feels fantastic to swap sweaty riding clothes for something clean and dry. My ride is less than 5 miles, and it still feels great to change.

    I do see a few people who ride in khakis, but if I did that I'd be terrified of puddles. By far the majority of other commuters I see must also be changing when they get to work.
    +1 - prefer changing into other clothes. I commute ~4 days a week 10-15 mi round trip.

  5. #5
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    Another vote for always changing. You'll be surprised how much you sweat even on cool days.

  6. #6
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    +1 on having a full change of clothes at work. I knock off a 38km round-trip and knowing that even if I get totally soaked on the way to work, I can still be dry at work is a lovely feeling.

  7. #7
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    Commuter Clothes?

    Do the baby wipe bath, keep a spare deodorant at work or in your bag, and change.

    I have done both changing and attempting to wear my riding clothes all day. I always felt better changing, but sometimes opted not to because of time. I always felt gross all day when I didn't change. Especially my shirt. I could get by wearing the same shorts except in the dead of summer but changing shirts is pretty much necessary.

  8. #8
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    Commuter Clothes?

    I call the "wet ones" wipe down a whore bath
    I landscape and have a 12 mile commute but get there early enough to cool down and stop sweating. Then I change into my work clothes. Ill spray on deodorant and do a quick whore bath but just the main areas. Not a big deal since ill be covered in dirt within te hour.

    One thing I did learn is to use spray can deodorant for commuting. I would find that my sticks always melted.

    Leave work shoes at work.


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    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  9. #9
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    One other thing about having riding-specific clothes, is that I basically only need one set. (others may have a different opinion on this)

    I wore poly shirts for a few years, but inevitably they became permanently stinky. So I bought a "cheap" merino tee for $40, and it can go weeks without needing a wash. And I wear the same pants or shorts all week, and have a couple of shorts liners. I'm sure that I've spent more on various layers of winter gloves than I have on the rest of my riding gear.

    Having 1 or 1.5 sets of gross riding clothes seems way easier than 5 sets of work/riding clothes.

  10. #10
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    Like everybody else so far, IMO better to change at work. Extra 2 pounds of clothing vs sweaty clothes, possible stink, and if you fall on the way to work (everybody falls sooner or later, everybody!) you can still look professional.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  11. #11
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    bump, can anyone name a brand that makes normal looking hybrid commuting clothing?
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    To be blunt;

    6) The Earth would begin to collapse into a black hole and it would make people sad.

  12. #12
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    I wear a breatheable, non-cotton t-shirt, comfy non-cottom boxers, and some basketball/running shorts. my commute is regularly over 100 degrees for 7.5 miles during the summer. I just change clothes when I get to work, but my employer dress code is pretty relaxed. a clean t-shirt and comfy sneakers is all I really change into, but you can get away with that at a bicycle shop.

  13. #13
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    So it definitely seems I'm in the minority here. I ride 7km each way and rarely change at work. I don't try to win the race on the bike path in the morning so I don't really sweat at all. I don't ride much faster than 25km/h.

    As for clothing, I would suggest you have a look at rock climbing pants. They have great stretch and look pretty normal. I also have some stretchy jeans I wear to ride at times. Feels fine to me. I don't do much for a bike specific shirt. Just a tee works for me.

    Andy

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