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Thread: cold lungs

  1. #1
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    cold lungs

    how do you guys fight the cold air on your lungs.Ive got everywhere else protected but man its starting to effect my commute in the morning.

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    ride hard

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    Heh. I'd like to be more helpful than Jeff, but my lungs/core are never really the issue - my fingers and toes are cold long before anything else.

    But when it gets down to about 0F I start covering my mouth/nose with a balaclava like this:



    It keep my warm breath in which helps, and doesn't restrict my breathing. Around -13F I add a neckwarmer thing on top of that, but that second layer usually does make breathing tougher.

  4. #4
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    ^^ Yep, thin 'clava here. I breathe in through nose and mouth, so most of the air is warmed through the 'clava. exhale through mouth, and the clava helps warm your face/head.
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    any brands that work better than others? thanks guys. yeh my feet get cold too but i figured thats just normal. My lungs dont bother me so much when riding but when i get home and sit down my throat and stuff starts to hurt a little.

  6. #6
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I got a thick one at first, thinking thick=warm, but it sucked. A thin one is plenty....4 below zero this morning for me. Mine is an REI brand.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigE610 View Post
    any brands that work better than others? thanks guys. yeh my feet get cold too but i figured thats just normal. My lungs dont bother me so much when riding but when i get home and sit down my throat and stuff starts to hurt a little.
    cold weather cough.....I had it bad for several years...

    Best thing is a Neti Pot, or a good daily rinse of the nostrils and sinuses in the shower.

    Also take lots of vitamin D.

    It does not take the body long to increase snot production to protect the airways, but all that snot can get backed up.

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    Mine's from Outdoor Research, but I think a lot of them are just rebranded versions of the same thing.

    I've never had lung issues after a ride, but after I get home I usually have a toasty warm shower which could help.

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    thanks guys. maybe im just fighting a cold or something. ill look into a thin clava and some hat showers/ neti pot fun when i get home

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    SMARTWOOL clava (SmartWool Balaclava at REI.com best for me.. used to use a POLARTEC clava but it kept my head wet from sweat and took forever to dry.. id use it for a ride and leave it in the car to dry only to find it still wet two days after for the next ride.
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  11. #11
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    I've had a couple of different face masks, and never been convinced that anything is warming the air measurably as I suck it in, based on the thickness of a face mask and the speed of the air.

    I get used to it within a few days and avoid generally avoid massive open-mouth-air-gulping efforts below about -10C.

  12. #12
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    I will +1 minimizing a lot of open mouth breathing in the cold. Your nose is built for warming and moistening the air that you inhale.

    At a certain point, though, all that bare skin on your face needs to be covered. I'm a furnace and I find a Buff (thin "summer" weight) to be effective over my face down to the teens. Beware that anything over your face that you breathe into in the cold will get wet and possibly frosty due to condensation. I do need a better 'clava for colder temps, but those conditions are uncommon enough that I've managed to get by with the cheapie I have now.

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    I have a midweight (200) Nordic gear 'clava when it gets ridiculously cold, and I wear a buff, doubled over as a neck/face gaiter or pulled over the head as a balaclava otherwise. It's open enough to not restrict my breathing, and closed enough to retain some warmth breathing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Heh. I'd like to be more helpful than Jeff, but my lungs/core are never really the issue - my fingers and toes are cold long before anything else.

    But when it gets down to about 0F I start covering my mouth/nose with a balaclava like this:



    It keep my warm breath in which helps, and doesn't restrict my breathing. Around -13F I add a neckwarmer thing on top of that, but that second layer usually does make breathing tougher.
    Thats cool. It doesn't get that cold here in Texas but damn if I don't buy one of these face mask. It was 30F this morning an 24F with the wind and I could't feel my face

  15. #15
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
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    When selecting a balaclava, take a waterbottle with you. Pour water over the mouthpiece and see if you can still breathe. Some of the balaclavas are no good once they've been wet over the mouth area; they'll prevent air getting through and make it near impossible to breathe.

    I had one from REI that was like that; took it back and ended up with a Seirus face mask. Works great.

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