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  1. #1
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    Celebrating Spring

    Such as it is! Snow is in tomorrow morning's forecast.

    Waited until temps almost got to 40 to ride, 'cause I could.

    A snow drop. A 3 week old yellow crocus with week old purple ones, Siberian Iris, and some miniature daffodils. They are a bit late this year as are the seasonal temps. Still, they say that spring is here and things will soon be hot enough for the summer heat thread revival.











    Apparently the closed up flowers found it a bit chilly and I was a layer less than I use 25-32 F, but was also just barely warm enough.

  2. #2
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    Beautiful, and I am determined to see them as encouraging, despite the 3' of snow and -8F still here.

  3. #3
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    ^^Ditto, spring still seems like it's a way off even though it's here on the calendar. I rode past some ice fisherman last night and asked how thick the ice was...Over 3 feet. 1F here this morning, spring is in the air.

  4. #4
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    The birds are singing for territory and the first Oriole in over 5 years was sighted.
    Theses birds showed up and made me want to buy a shotgun:




    The flowers continue to cycle. The very early have yielded to the early ones:




    Yesterday thunderstorms and 3" and 64. Today hit 50 feeling like 42 but the yard work had to be done and did me in.

  5. #5
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    No flowers here, but we do have some signs of spring...
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
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    Grass went from a very few green springs to mostly green and needing a cut this week. First year since 2001 that I haven't had to mow most of March.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    No flowers here, but we do have some signs of spring...
    Is the sinking truck an annual event?

    Where my wife grew up there is a "lake" (more a big slew) and every year they drive an old beater out on the ice and wait for spring.

  8. #8
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    ^^ Yes and no. Not that particular truck on that particular lake, but there are always a few. A while back some Einstein lost a car, then tried to pull it out with a truck, and then went after that with an excavator. 0 for 3.

  9. #9
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    ^ that's fantastic. Too bad he didn't have something bigger to send in after them - like a tank, or a passenger jet?

  10. #10
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    The early tulips are going and the mid tulips are just opening:



    The Myrtle and the grape hyacinths are flowering:



    Same scene this morning:


    A very late spring indeed. Been here 14 springs. Never saw snow that accumulated even this much this late before.

  11. #11
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    More and less flowers

    Mid season tulips:



    Some mid season miniatures:


    One of the few flowers on the weeping cherry that was not lost with that last snow/frost:



    On the wild side 1- Dogtooth Violet AKA Trout Lily:


    On the wild side 2- Dutchman's Breeches:


    One flower on the neighbor's magnolia (earlier ones in town were full flower then frozen):


    Another neighbor's Callery Pear:


    Mowed the lawn for the first time this year on 04/17 over a month later than usual. So even nature is complaining. I rode without leg or arm coverings for the first time, too!

  12. #12
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    Red Bleeding Hearts, White Bleeding Hearts, and Blue Periwinkle in time for Cinco de Mayo, a couple of months early for Independence Day:



    We may hit 80 for the first time since early October last year.

  13. #13
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    What spring.....either cold and rainy or hot

  14. #14
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    The plants say it is spring though temps have been summerish with the winds of March:










  15. #15
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    Finally spotted some flowers in the woods today...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Celebrating Spring-flowwer.jpg  


  16. #16
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    A Jack in the Pulpit:



    The Duchess in front of Irises and beside fresh snapdragons


  17. #17
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    callery pears can die.

    I've never heard trout lilies called dogtooth violets before. They've always been trout lilies to me.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    callery pears can die.
    *** Too many, or you just don't like them?

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I've never heard trout lilies called dogtooth violets before. They've always been trout lilies to me.
    I suspect that the name Dog-toothed Violet came from Europe where a related species is violet and the bulb is dog tooth shaped. It may be an Ontario, Canada usage.

    Trout Lilies, Fawn Lilies and Dog's-Tooth Violets - The Elegant Erythroniums

  19. #19
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    Callery pears are considered invasive in Indiana. And, bradford pears smell like dead fish for about a week.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk

  20. #20
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    And female Gingko's crushed fruit smell like asparagus urine. I didn't know that the Callery Pear was rated invasive. It could succumb to mysterious disease, I suppose.

  21. #21
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    Diseases of callery pears are unlikely. A chainsaw and triclopyr are more appropriate.

    Callery Pear - A Bad, Bad Plant With Pretty Flowers - http:www.mc-iris.org
    Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana)

    ginkgo isn't exactly native, either. but at least it's not invasive.

  22. #22
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    I was suggesting to be the vector of a 'dis-ease'. No fruit on it for two seasons and there is another 300 feet away. So it it remains sterile it isn't hurting anything. So I will let it be if it remains so.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I was suggesting to be the vector of a 'dis-ease'. No fruit on it for two seasons and there is another 300 feet away. So it it remains sterile it isn't hurting anything. So I will let it be if it remains so.
    they're probably genetically identical, then. the risk is if someone plants a different cultivar in the area. I've seen some vacant lots here in Indy this spring along my drive commute that are choked with callery pear. I have a special hatred for invasives so my tendency is to kill them first, ask questions later.

    I am battling bush honeysuckle and a few other shrubby invasives at my rental right now. if any are callery pear, they're very young ones. my neighbors at least don't have any, thank goodness. lots of burning bush, though. ugh. I have a very large brush pile I'm working on, and I haven't cleared all my fence lines yet.

  24. #24
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    Last Day of Spring and June is Bustin' Out All Over

    Daylily:







    Hollyhock:





    Sweet Pea:



    Rose:



    Coneflower:



    Clematis:



    Yucca:



    Prickly Pear:



    Snapdragon:



    Geraniums and friends:



    Bumblebees, moths, butterflies and hummingbirds add more color.

  25. #25
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    I am fighting honeysuckle bush, wintercreeper, and cinnamon vine. I think I have got the last one cleared. I have a little wintercreeper to finish off. But the honeysuckle bush gets reseeded and will be a lifetime project. I just hope I get no tick bites. Three last July blossomed into the classic red rash and three weeks of heavy antibiotic. If mercury toxic, Lyme is worse.

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