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  1. #1
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    Carrying groceries on a commuter... Front basket or rear panniers?

    I have an upright flat bar steel frame commuter. I'm want to increase it's carrying capacity to accommodate up to two bags of groceries. A rear rack is already installed.

    What is the most efficient means to carry extra weight without dramatically affecting the bike's performance?

    1. Add collapsible basket-style panniers to the rear rack

    2. Add a Wald basket with roll-top insert to the front

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    It depends on bike geometry. Some bikes handle front loads well, some don't. Most of the time when things are heavy, they mount them low.

    I got a little Swift Paloma handlebar bag and when I put too much stuff in it I can tell.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    I have a back rack on my cross-check (one of the tubus racks; forget which off the top of my head). Given you have the rack already, would highly recommend panniers if you want "2 grocery sacks" worth. I've had some pretty heavy loads mounted in panniers back there with no problems.

    Are you thinking baskets in which you can place 2 grocery paper bags, or just two panniers you can load up in the store, and then attach to the bike afterwards? I think one of the old-time classic solutions is the roll-up canvas panniers... though I do like my carradice individual panniers.
    Last edited by evandy; 06-19-2017 at 05:06 PM.

  5. #5
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    I used waste baskets as el cheapo panniers with a home made porteur rack. I have used a picnic cooler on it for frozen food. Keeping the weight low helps a lot.


  6. #6
    My other ride
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I used waste baskets as el cheapo panniers with a home made porteur rack. I have used a picnic cooler on it for frozen food. Keeping the weight low helps a lot.

    Dude, I would probably never even consider riding that!

    But...you get full marks for a innovated setup!

  7. #7
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    I'd say a proper rack and pannier for the front to help balance the weight, front to back. I use and have used my Monkey as a commuter and grocery getter and I've only had a rear rack and very big panniers, can load it down with 40lbs, but then it feels like the front barely has any contact with the road, have always wanted a front rack to balance things out. Would ultimately get one like the Surly one shown below if I start back doing long hauls on the bike, but just so freakin dangerous on the roads these days I don't normally.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carrying groceries on a commuter... Front basket or rear panniers?-p1040656.jpg  

    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  8. #8
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    My commuter/errand-runner/grocery-getter/urban cruiser has an Old Man Mountain rear rack (model has lobster as part of its name) with Axiom Appalachia panniers and a Nashbar front rack that mounts by means of the V-brake bosses. I'll try to get a pic of my bike when I get the chance.

    I hardly use the front rack but use the rear every time I ride. Still, front rack has proven useful before when I needed the extra space for unexpected cargo. I sort of miss the Wald folding baskets that hitch to the side of the rear rack. Opened, a standard size paper grocery bag fits perfectly in there. But the racks are heavy. I like the Appalachia panniers because it's well made and light, but its cargo capacity and ease of loading/unloading isn't all that great.

    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk

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