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  1. #1
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    Best waterproof jackets for commuting?

    I'm in a market for a new waterproof jacket and there's a great deal of info out there....looking for folks who have used products and their thoughts. Thought others might be in the same boat right now with the changing seasons.

    Info to share:

    The jacket name:

    Is it really waterproof?

    Breathability: It's like wearing a garbage bag...or it does really breathe.


    Temps you have used it in ( I am in a moderate climate Nor California).

    Price.


    Thanks in advance to those who share info.
    Happy new year..Stuff $: Eno 29wheel (non disc), Yakima, 2 steelheads, with towers for Volvo luggage rails.

  2. #2
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    I have the PI P.R.O. Barrier jacket. It breathes very well, and is quite waterproof... if you do what PI says to keep the arms waterproof. They happen to neglect that information with the jacket so you'll have to contact them with their recommendations. The thing with rain wear is you have to get an expensive one to get it to breath well.

  3. #3
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    eVent is the best material for breathability today. REI recently had a running one on sale for about $90.

  4. #4
    namagomi
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    They're all basically garbage bags! You start sweating from working hard - you start getting wet.


  5. #5
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I use an REI Taku. It stayed totally waterproof for a couple years. Still waterproof enough for Oregon. If you don't get wet from outside, you will get wet from the inside.

  6. #6
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    I've gone softshell for Oregon. You get wet, but it's pleasant outside wet rather than my body juices wet.

  7. #7
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    i bought a montagne jacket with eVent fabric, and i have to admit the breathability is considerablly better than the other junk i have worn in the past. there is a 4 block long hill at the end of my office commute, and on a wet day wearing the montagne i can make it past the 3rd block before the sweat starts inside and i get clammy. in the past with the older waterproofs, the body starts to steam up middle of the first block. so the eVent fabric breathes a bit better but not totally great.

    i am thinking maybe trying a rain cape instead.

  8. #8
    jrm
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    REI Sierra Designs Microlight Jacket -

    Its a great all round season jacket for Oakland weather. They repel rain pretty well and have ventilation opening ins in the pits and on the sides. I think it cost about $40.

    http://www.rei.com/product/772609

  9. #9
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    I have a Endura Flyte Jacket, cost me £90



    2 Years of commuting in it, Its seen some of the heaviest rain the uk has to offer, snow, -10 degree conditions. I've only run with a baselayer and t combo underneath in winter and found myself more than warm enough.

    I can honestly say it deals with moisture inside extremely well, and stops the rain coming in. I completely recommend to anyone! However as always Jackets are a personal choice!
    Last edited by crazychimpjimbo; 10-22-2010 at 01:48 AM.
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  10. #10
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    that looks really nice
    need more bikes...

  11. #11
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    Regardless of what anyone says, there's nothing better than Gore-Tex. Unfortunately, you pay a hefty price.
    There's not a fabric out there that has the breathability and waterproofness that Gore-Tex can offer. There's also not a fabric manufacturer out there that has the history that Gore has, especially in the medical field.
    I know, because I work for one of the best outdoor clothing manufacturers in the world.
    eVent is one of the better fabrics out there, but take a look at it under a microscope (I have) and it doesn't compare to Gore-Tex for breathability.

    Wish the stuff wasn't so damn pricey.

  12. #12
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    Maybe roger you should say what you intend on spending so people can advise you better!
    I searched long and hard reading reviews as my budget was £100.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boise Jim
    Regardless of what anyone says, there's nothing better than Gore-Tex. Unfortunately, you pay a hefty price.
    There's not a fabric out there that has the breathability and waterproofness that Gore-Tex can offer. There's also not a fabric manufacturer out there that has the history that Gore has, especially in the medical field.
    I know, because I work for one of the best outdoor clothing manufacturers in the world.
    eVent is one of the better fabrics out there, but take a look at it under a microscope (I have) and it doesn't compare to Gore-Tex for breathability.

    Wish the stuff wasn't so damn pricey.
    I don't know about looking through an electron microscope or anything, but I can tell you from my experience, that eVent seems to vent a lot better and keeps me cooler than my Gore-tex stuff ever did. It was noticeable enough for me to sell off all my Gore-tex and replace it with eVent. The most noticeable was in shoes. I wear Teva's eVent shoes nearly every day and they aren't much warmer than non-waterproof shoes. When I had Gore-tex shoes, they were relegated to cool weather only as my feet sweat pretty heavily.

  14. #14
    canuck
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    Showers Pass.

  15. #15
    What It Be ?
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    I just ordered up an Endura Venturi II I'll post up and let you guys/gals know how it does.

  16. #16
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    Marmot PreCip rain jacket...

    Cheap
    Light
    Made well
    Works in warm and cold weather
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  17. #17
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    I just picked up the Endura Gridlock coat, it has been doing a good job in the mornings its been in the mid 20s, i wear a base with a t over, the vents under the arms and the adjust ability is a really nice feature.

  18. #18
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    I find myself in the exact same boat as you looking for a good jacket.
    One of my wants is a hood to go over the helmet. I saw the Luis Garneau Seattle jacket and might give it a go. No experience with it, just a suggestion...
    $100 - $130
    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...0#ReviewHeader

  19. #19
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    Froggtoggs Toadz Horny Toadz High Vis Green...
    $90

    Water Proof it is; I rode through an epic downpour for about 6 miles, 40 degrees Farienhight totaly dry with the exception of hands n feet.

    I can get away with wearing it over my work clothes without sweating hardcore...

    Plus it is super bright, I mean it hurts my eyes to look at it. Also it has reflective areas on the back and most outline seems. It will draw attention...

  20. #20
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    My softshell choice failed me completely a couple days after I posted in this thread. I saw that Shower's Pass had their original "Club" on sale for a killer price so I got one. Features are low, breathability is low. But as a hardshell rain jacket, it is really close to perfect. I've been absolutely soaked on two rides with it, and find that it's about 95% waterproof. One rainstorm did cause the zipper and flap combo to leak. Another had the pit zips start to capillary in. But the absolutely miserable becomes bearable again.

  21. #21
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    You know, after becoming 100% water-logged, you come to find that you're fully waterproof again. LOL

    OP may have already found their jacket, but here's a few jackets that are interesting to me anyway.Here's a thread with interesting points about GoreTex Pro, Schoeller c_change, and eVent.

    For me, I've been using a P.I. Barrier Convertible Jacket ($150). Good in a mild shower. Breathes well enough, but when I start to exert real hard I believe I start sweating more than it can vent... and that may be the case with a lot of jackets. No pit zips in mine, so I have to zip down the front to let in cool air if I start to get too clammy.

  22. #22
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Don't screw around. Showers Pass.

  23. #23
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway
    Don't screw around. Showers Pass.
    their stuff looks nice...
    what's your 'kit', and how well does it work?
    How should I size it?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  24. #24
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Same w/ Endura...how is that stuff sized?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  25. #25
    Squeaky Wheel
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    I have the Double Century. I ride year-round in the Seattle area which means I ride in wet conditions a lot. This jacket performs very well. Good breathability, plenty of vents. The Double Century is a very lightweight jacket which works well for me, I can layer up underneath it. There is a sizing chart on the website.

  26. #26
    What It Be ?
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    So far so good with the Endura Venturi II. I am wearing a large I am 5'11 175lbs. I have there Knickers to in a Medium should of went with a large.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by burmer_skark
    One of my wants is a hood to go over the helmet.
    http://www.showerspass.com/catalog/a...s/helmet-cover dave

  28. #28
    Which way? Uphill.
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    I have tried several jackets and here's my opinions on each in the order that I've bought them.

    Cheap plastic "shower curtain" jacket
    - Keeps rain off you, only cost $10, even with vents built in this is a sweltering option.
    BlackBottoms Rain Jacket
    - Also picked this up cheap (<$20). Fits better than the plastic jacket, not very waterproof, not breathable, zipper is not durable at all, stows into a built-in pocket nicely.
    GoLite Phantasm Jacket - GoreTex PacLite fabric. Absolutely waterproof, breathes well, especially in below 60 degrees, packs small, not cycling specific so no tail drop and more fabric to flap in the wind.
    Sugoi Hydrolite Jacket - Really cool fabric, really breathable when it's dry, swells when it rains to make itself fully waterproof. Very packable, durablility is questionable, I wouldn't want to wear this a lot with a backpack. Packs into it's own pocket and has a waistbelt to attach it to you.
    Adidas Adistar CP Rain Jacket - Fully waterproof, cycling specific cut (runs a little small), very lightweight and packable (comparable to the GoLite). Doesn't breathe as well as the GoreTex PacLite, but it has a rear flap that makes it just as usable/comfortable. Long arm cuts with wrist gaskets and fabric to cover the back of your hand. My favorite cycling rain jacket, the only downside is that it doesn't have a collar that goes very high making it less versatile for winter use.

    For cycling I prefer the Adidas, but for versatility I like the GoLite with it's hood.
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  29. #29
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    I have a couple.

    Descente something-or-other - It was the cheapest cycling jacket at my shop in 2006 or so. Not really sure what it's called. It's all polyester, hard-faced. Not very water proof, but helps in a drizzle and cuts wind when it's not too wet. However, it breathes pretty well. If I don't expect to get rained on much, it's my go-to jacket for riding in transitional weather. I wear it over a jersey for sportier rides; in the 40s and lower, I'll probably layer on something insulated.

    Da Kine something - A cotton-poly hoodie, with a wind resistant liner. It breathes alright, cuts wind very well, and takes some time to get wet, so it's great for transitional weather if I want a little insulation. Good down to weather in the 40s or so. Gets waterlogged and stays waterlogged in serious rain, and it can get kind of gross inside if I climb a hill out of the saddle with it zipped up. I practically live in this thing - it wears like a hoodie, except if I get the inside sweaty, looks like a hoodie, but does perform a lot better than a plain cotton or cotton-poly sweat shirt.

    Gore Bikewear Countdown Jacket - This was meant to be a "spend real money, get a real jacket" purchase. It's their Paclite Shell, which is a two-layer (I think) laminate, probably with an additional coating on the outside. It's very light, but a little too bulky for me to get into a jersey pocket. It's very, very waterproof, but it really doesn't breathe that well. I only wear it if I'm riding in a downpour. I always layer this over something with long sleeves. The membrane is exposed on the inside, and feels odd against my skin.
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  30. #30
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    apply at seaworld
    work there for 2 weeks to get a pay check
    quit and keep the amazing waterproof removable fleece lined northface jacket that has a seaworld emblem on it.

  31. #31
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    My jacket is technically a snow jacket, but works great as winter cycling armour:
    Burton AK
    Today was -22 F and I was toasty with a wool layer underneath
    Very breathable, pit zips if you get real warm
    Cost: about $300
    Water Proof: Yes, very

    http://www.alternativecommutepueblo.com/

  32. #32
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    Endura Helium Waterproof Jacket for me. Had a super wet fall, so I ordered one and it has hardly rained since it arrived a month ago. Can't beat that for effectiveness.

  33. #33
    gimme friction
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    lols

    Quote Originally Posted by EBrider
    Endura Helium Waterproof Jacket for me. Had a super wet fall, so I ordered one and it has hardly rained since it arrived a month ago. Can't beat that for effectiveness.
    Similar story here...decided to wait until spring to order my new Arkel rack/pannier system for commuting...now apparently spring is here, so I just ordered them. It will probably be raining again by the time they arrive.
    Johnny Ryall rode MTB

  34. #34
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    I'm looking for a good and affordable warm weather rain jacket. I am leaning towards the Fox dawn patrol since it looks light and has a hood.

    How important is having a hood either over or under your helmet for riding in the rain?

    Should I not consider whether or not a jacket has a hood, and just use one of those shower cap style helmet covers?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dgtlbliss
    I'm looking for a good and affordable warm weather rain jacket. I am leaning towards the Fox dawn patrol since it looks light and has a hood.

    How important is having a hood either over or under your helmet for riding in the rain?

    Should I not consider whether or not a jacket has a hood, and just use one of those shower cap style helmet covers?
    I would avoid wearing a hood since it reduces peripheral vision and hearing, go with a shower cap or skullcap under the helmet.

  36. #36
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    I like a hood if it's really pouring, especially if it's cold. Yesterday I put it over a wool cap, and under the helmet. I've used a helmet cover before but it conflicts with my helmet-mounted light. Also, they can send cold water down your neck. My hood has those cinchy things in back to minimize impact on vision. On the way home (uphill) I undid the pitzips and that was a big help, comfort-wise, though I noticed condensation in the sleeves when I got home. It's some patagonia jacket I got for hiking, not bike-specific. I only choose it in heavy rain.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc
    I would avoid wearing a hood since it reduces peripheral vision and hearing, go with a shower cap or skullcap under the helmet.
    Some rain coats have a cord that can be adjusted to pull back the hood next to your eyes to help with peripheral vision. I think my Marmot Precip might, but I'm not at home, so I can't tell. One way or another, I highly recommend the Precip for a 2.5 layer raincoat. 3 layer is generally better, and even better than that is something with a waterproof membrane (Gore-Tex and eVent being the most popular, and arguably the best). I wear my Precip down to the 40's and layer up under it as necessary, in the winter I tend to go for my North Face hard shell (Gore-Tex).

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boise Jim
    Regardless of what anyone says, there's nothing better than Gore-Tex. Unfortunately, you pay a hefty price.
    There's not a fabric out there that has the breathability and waterproofness that Gore-Tex can offer. There's also not a fabric manufacturer out there that has the history that Gore has, especially in the medical field.
    I know, because I work for one of the best outdoor clothing manufacturers in the world.
    eVent is one of the better fabrics out there, but take a look at it under a microscope (I have) and it doesn't compare to Gore-Tex for breathability.

    Wish the stuff wasn't so damn pricey.
    Gore Tex is being left behind. eVent is made by a company with an extremely long history of technology. I own several versions of both and you sir, are wrong.

  39. #39
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    I recently bought an Endura Windchill Jacket. I think it's a superb jacket.

  40. #40
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    +1 on the eVent stuff being great. I have had a 66 North 2 layer eVent shell for 5 years and it performs as well or better than my Arcteryx Gore-Tex shells.

    I will also take the other side as well and say 1 more vote for the SWRVE Milwaukee ES Hoodie: Black Label Midweight Softshell GoreTex as I just ordered one.

    Both work well and I look more at who is working with the fabrics than the fabric itself. For those that mentioned the Schoeller, they make some great fabrics as well.

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